The National Park Service (NPS)

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The National Park Service (NPS) is committed to making facilities, programs, services, and employment accessible for visitors and employees with disabilities through compliance with the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.  The accessibility of commercial services within national parks is also covered under all applicable federal, state, and local laws.

The NPS works to ensure that people with disabilities can participate in the same programs, activities, and employment opportunities available to those without disabilities in the most integrated setting possible.  Alternative means of accessing facilities, programs, or services are provided only when an accessible direct experience cannot be provided.  Accessibility solutions are developed in consultation with the disability community.  https://www.nps.gov/aboutus/accessibilityforvisitors.htm

The approach to answering questions regarding accessibility that the National Park Service chose to take in its official director’s order #42 was to “develop and coordinate a System-wide, comprehensive approach to achieving the highest level of accessibility that is reasonable, while ensuring consistency with the other legal mandates of conservation and protection of the resources [they] manage.”  “What we try to do is provide access to those with disabilities while still providing the true experience that the park is there for,” said Dave Park, national accessibility coordinator for the NPS.  While keeping a park as natural as possible, NPS must follow other documents’ guidelines in order to satisfy all people universally.

The NPS presents annual awards to parks that make the greatest strides toward universal accessibility called the National Park Accessibility Achievement Awards.  One of the awards is the Director’s Sustained Park Accessibility Achievement Award.  This award is given recognizing a park that has made “sustained” efforts to provide and improve equal accessibility for persons with disabilities over a period of at least three years.  “Funding is a major problem with getting improvements done in the national parks,” said National Center on Accessibility’s Gary Robb.
http://www.ournationalparks.us/park_issues/accessibility_for_all_without_harm_to_parks_is_goal/

Even though there are disability access initiatives across all parks, some are definitely better than others.  The more developed and more popular a park is, the more likely it is that it has received the funding and workforce necessary to make accommodations; this is a particularly intensive process in parks, since it’s very important not to disturb the natural landscape.  So, while not all national parks are made equal, you can bet the effort is there.

The National Parks Service provides a useful access guide, “National Parks:  Accessible to Everyone”;  review that website to learn about what opportunities are available in all units of the National Park System for visitors with disabilities and special needs.

The following blog was found on http://www.executiveclasstravelers.com/1/blog/2010/04/27/from-the-disabled-travelers-mailbag-wheelchair-accessible-national-parks/ :

Several years after my accident, I started wheelchairtraveling.com to help people looking for accessibility information because what was provided by the tourism industry and government entities was often insufficient or nonexistent.  Inspired by my dad’s dream of visiting all of the United States national parks and the 25th Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, I launched the Access to Parks Project (#Access2Parks) to improve available access knowledge about our national parks.  My plan is to visit parks, survey accessibility, and share what I find on my website and with the national parks.  I will choose which parks to visit based on a combination of access potential and need of accessibility information. 
Author of the above blog is Ashley Lyn Olson.
http://www.newmobility.com/2015/10/accessible-national-parks/

The Access Pass is a free, lifetime pass available to United States citizens or permanent residents, regardless of age, that have been medically determined to have a permanent disability.  The Pass can be used at over 2000 Federal recreation sites across the nation, including National Parks, National Wildlife Refuges, and many National Forest lands.
https://store.usgs.gov/pass/access_pass_application.pdf

The Access Pass admits the Pass owner and any passengers traveling with him/her in a noncommercial vehicle at per-vehicle fee areas or the Pass owner and three additional adults where per-person fees are charged.  The Access Pass may also offer a discount on some expanded amenity fees, such as camping.  Discounts offered by the Pass vary widely across the many different types of recreation sites.  Pass owners are encouraged to check with sites they plan to visit before obtaining a pass to verify that their Pass will be accepted.  Anytime a Pass is used, photo identification will be requested to verify Pass ownership

ALABAMA

Alabama was heavily involved in the American Civil War. The Confederacy’s capital was initially at Montgomery. A company of cavalry soldiers from Huntsville, Alabama, joined Nathan Bedford Forrest’s battalion in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. The company wore new uniforms with yellow trim on the sleeves, collar and coat tails. This led to them being greeted with “Yellowhammer”, and the name later was applied to all Alabama troops in the Confederate Army. The state bird is also known as a Yellowhammer. Alabama has been identified as one of the most religious states in the United States, with about 58% of the population attending church regularly. Although known as “The Cotton State,” Alabama ranks between eighth and tenth in national cotton production, according to various reports, with Texas, Georgia, and Mississippi comprising the top three. Alabama currently ranks 4th in the nation for vehicle exports. Bryant-Denny Stadium is the home of the Alabama football team (University of Alabama Crimson Tide), and has a seating capacity of 101,821, and is the fifth largest stadium in America.

A notable natural wonder in Alabama is “Natural Bridge” rock, the longest natural bridge east of the Rockies, located just south of Haleyville. Alabama has 7 National Parks, 1 Natural Heritage Area, 3 National Trails managed by the NPS, 38 National Historic Landmarks, and 7 National Natural Landmarks. A selection of these is set forth below.

 

NAME WEBSITE PHONE FACEBOOK INFORMATION
Alabama Gulf Coast Zoo alabamagulfcoastzoo.com 251.968.5732 Email:[email protected]  
Estuarium at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab disl.org/estuarium 251.861.2141 Email:[email protected] INFORMATION
Freedom Riders National Monument, Anniston, Alabama https://www.nps.gov/frri/index.htm (404) 507-5605 (National Park Service Supt. in Atlanta, Georgia) https://www.facebook.com/FreedomRidersNPS The Freedom Riders National Monument is a United States National Monument in Anniston, Alabama, established by President Barack Obama in January 2017 to preserve and commemorate the Freedom Riders during the Civil Rights Movement. Freedom Riders National Monument is a new national park unit and will be administered by the National Park Service. The park includes the former Greyhound Bus Station located at 1031 Gurnee Avenue in downtown Anniston where segregationists attacked a bus carrying Freedom Riders in May of 1961, and the spot six miles away on the side of the highway where they firebombed the hobbled bus and attempted to trap the Freedom Riders inside it. The Greyhound Bus Station is part of the Anniston Civil Rights and Heritage Trail, which includes nine sites associated with the struggle for civil rights in Anniston. A self-guided driving tour is available online at: annistoncivilrightstrail.org. (Please note that website is only accessible with a mobile device). There are currently no visitor services at the park.
Natchez Trace Parkway (AL, MS, TN) https://www.nps.gov/natr/index.htm (800) 305-7417 https://www.facebook.com/NatchezTraceParkwayNPS

The Natchez Trace Parkway is a 444-mile drive through exceptional scenery and 10,000 years of North American history. Used by American Indians, “Kaintucks,” settlers, and future presidents, the Old Trace played an important role in American history. Today, visitors can enjoy not only a scenic drive but also hiking, biking, horseback riding, and camping. The Natchez Trace Parkway is a designated bicycle route. Whether you are traveling the parkway from Natchez to Nashville, or a section in between, here are a few of some park Rangers’ favorite places: “Sunken Trace at milepost 41.5. This stop gives you one of the iconic pictures from the Natchez Trace. Just a short five minute walk can send you back in time over 200 years. From this spot it is easy to imagine traveling the Old Natchez Trace by foot before the automobile.” ~ Ranger Andy “Jeff Busby Little Mountain at milepost 193.1. Atop the summit, you can see the hills of Mississippi or follow the 1/2 mile loop down into to a shady hollow.” ~ Ranger Kathryn “Buzzard Roost Spring at milepost 320.3. It is one of my favorite little-known stops. The Water from the spring is a vibrant almost opaque blue, and it’s a great spot to relax and listen to the water as is gushes forth from the earth.” ~ Ranger Jake

For more “places to go,” follow the links on the website divided by geographic sections from south to north (through Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee). There are numerous activities along the Natchez Trace Parkway that are accessible to people with varying abilities. From paved overlooks and trails, to visitor centers there are opportunities to get out of your car and experience the Parkway. View this website link for a list of 18 accessible facilities and features may help you plan your trip (https://www.nps.gov/natr/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm). In addition to the listed locations, each pullout along the Parkway has a routed sign that can be read from the vehicle. Interpretive signs at trailheads and parking areas are also wheelchair accessible.

National Historic Trail – Trail of Tears (AL, AR, GA, IL, KY, MO, NC, OK, TN) https://www.nps.gov/trte/index.htm (505) 988-6098 No Facebook connection found on the website. Remember and commemorate the survival of the Cherokee people, forcefully removed from their homelands in Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee to live in Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. They traveled by foot, horse, wagon, or steamboat in 1838-1839. The sites on the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail, stretching 5,043 miles across nine states, together form a journey of compassion and understanding. The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail passes through the present-day states of Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Tennessee. During the administration of President Martin Van Buren, nearly 17,000 Cherokees—along with approximately 2,000 black slaves owned by Cherokees—were uprooted from their homes between 1838 and 1839 and were forced by the U.S. military to march from “emigration depots” in Eastern Tennessee (such as Fort Cass) toward the more distant Indian Territory west of Arkansas (now the state of Oklahoma). During this relocation, an estimated 4,000 Cherokees died along the way west. In the Cherokee language, the event is called Nunna daul Isunyi—”the Trail Where We Cried.” The Cherokees were not the only American Indians forced to emigrate as a result of the Indian removal efforts of the United States, and so the phrase “Trail of Tears” is sometimes used to refer to similar events endured by other American Indian peoples, especially among the “Five Civilized Tribes” (the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek (Muscogee), and Seminole). The phrase originated as a description of the earlier emigration of the Choctaw nation. The trail commemorates the forced removal of Cherokee from their homelands in Alabama, Georgia and Tennessee; the paths that 17 Cherokee detachments followed westward; and the revival of the Cherokee Nation, ending in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. As part of the new settlement in Indian Territory after the Cherokee Native Americans were forced west from the American Southeast on the Trail of Tears, Tahlequah was designated the capital of ancestors of both the Cherokee Nation and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians. The Cherokee Supreme Court Building, located in downtown Tahlequah and constructed in 1844, is the oldest public building in Oklahoma. Several markers of Cherokee and Native American heritage are found in town: street signs and business signs are noted in both the Cherokee language and English. Such signs use the syllabary (symbols that represent English syllables) created by Sequoyah, a Cherokee scholar of the 1820s who created the writing system. We encourage you to retrace the trail on foot, by vehicle, over water, by bicycle or horse—to sacred sites that tell the story of suffering and intolerance, but just as important, one of survival. Trail sites are in private, municipal, tribal, federal, or state ownership. Please ask for permission before visiting any trail sites on private lands and check with public sites for visiting hours and regulations. Due to the trail’s length, you may decide to travel its entirety or just one or two sites. Take time to plan your trip to meet your needs.
Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site, Tuskegee, Alabama https://www.nps.gov/tuai/index.htm (334) 724-0922 No Facebook connection found on website. Before the first African American military pilots became known as the “Red Tails,” they wore striped tails as they began their flight training in the Army’s PT-17 Stearman bi-plane. Their flying adventure started at Moton Field, in Tuskegee, Alabama, where the Army Air Corps began a military “experiment” to see if Negroes could be trained to fly combat aircraft. Come prepared to let your imagination soar back through the years......back to the days of segregation and Jim Crow; back to the time when a few young black men were told they weren’t good enough to be a part of the United States Army Air Forces; back to the time when those who came to be called the Tuskegee Airmen proved to all that they had the right stuff to succeed; back to the time when the Tuskegee Airmen were awarded numerous honors and citations for their bravery in combat; back to the time when America finally recognized that these too were her sons and daughters and finally embraced them as such. The Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site is accessible to wheelchair users; accessible bathrooms are located in both the Hangar #1 and Hangar #2 museums; and the Skyway Club is accessible via wheelchair lift from the ground level of the building.
ALASKA

As the largest state in the country, Alaska is credited for both its breathtaking scenery and rich history. The National Park Service strives to make the parks as universally accessible as possible. However, extra obstacles will be encountered because of the remote, wilderness nature of this special place. The United States purchased Alaska from the Russian Empire in 1867. Alaska was admitted as the 49th state in 1959. Visiting Alaska is not only fun and interesting, but also educational. It is the home of Mount McKinley (the tallest mountain in North America), 100,000 glaciers, 24 National Parks, 1 National Heritage Area, 13 Wild and Scenic Rivers managed by the NPS, 49 National Heritage Landmarks, 16 National Natural Landmarks, and 1 World Heritage Site. Denali is largely wilderness without trails, designated by Congress to remain a “primitive” area in many respects.

Alaska Zoo alaskazoo.org 907.346.2133 Email:[email protected] INFORMATION
Reindeer Farm reindeerfarm.com 907.745.4000 Email:[email protected] INFORMATION
Denali National Park & Preserve, Denali Park, Alaska https://www.nps.gov/dena/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm (907) 683-2294 https://www.facebook.com/denaliNPS

Denali National Park is celebrating its 100th birthday in 2017. Denali is six million acres of wild land, bisected by one ribbon of road. Travelers along it see the relatively low-elevation taiga forest give way to high alpine tundra and snowy mountains, culminating in North America’s tallest peak, 20,310’ Denali. Wild animals large and small roam unfenced lands, living as they have for ages. Solitude, tranquility and wilderness await. Things To Do include: Ranger Programs, Field Seminars and More; Wildlife Viewing; Hiking; Backpacking; Cycling, Photography, Fishing, Winter Activities; Flight Seeing, and Guiding Services.

Accessibility: Theater talks occur in the Visitor Center theater and are accessible;

Trail Hikes: Around the park entrance, these typically occur on the McKinley Station and Horseshoe Lake Trails (see trail descriptions below). Elsewhere in the park, hikes typically occur on the Thorofare Ridge Trail and Tundra Loop (see website for trail descriptions);

Sled dog demonstrations: Buses - at least one of which has a wheelchair lift - take visitors from the Denali Visitor Center to the sled dog kennels, 1.5 miles away. Kennels amphitheater has limited seating - please arrive early to ensure a seat, rather than a standing space.

Campground programs: Each campground’s amphitheater is accessible via level paths, surfaced with well-compacted gravel. Many benches are in each campground amphitheater, but please arrive early to ensure a seat.

Discovery Hikes: These day-long, off-trail hikes are extremely strenuous. Conditions vary considerably from hike to hike.

Campground programs: Each campground’s amphitheater is accessible via level paths, surfaced with well-compacted gravel. Many benches are in each campground amphitheater, but please arrive early to ensure a seat. Programs occur in Riley Creek, Savage River, Tekanika River and Wonder Lake Campgrounds.

Bus services: Ranger-led tours: Many tour and shuttle buses have a wheelchair lift. Please be sure to note the need for such a bus when making advance reservations or when buying tickets in person at the Wilderness Access Center. Drivers also save the front seat of each bus to facilitate easy access for those with mobility issues, but who do not require a wheelchair. A step-stool is available to aid passengers getting into/out of the bus.

Restrooms: Breaks for restroom stops occur roughly every 90 minutes on every type of bus trip in Denali. All rest stops in the park have one or more wheelchair-accessible bathroom.

Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, Skagway, Alaska https://www.nps.gov/klgo/index.htm (907) 983-9200 https://www.facebook.com/KlondikeGoldRushAlaska Headlines screamed “Gold!” The dream of a better life catapulted thousands of people to Alaska and the Yukon Territory. Their journey shaped them, and changed the people they encountered and the north forever. Today, the park remembers the trails, boomtowns, and stories of the Klondike Gold Rush. In Skagway, Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park is made up of over 20 historical buildings, and four of them are museums that are open to the public. Each museum shares a different aspect of gold rush life from saloons to families to tourism. Additionally, the Skagway Museum is run by the City of Skagway and covers town history from gold rush to present day. Several of our park buildings have been renovated to meet accessibility needs. The Visitor Center is located in the historic White Pass & Yukon Route depot. Talk to a ranger, learn about daily programs, watch park film “Gold Fever: Race to the Klondike,” and more. Restrooms, water stations, and benches are available for visitors. Visitor Center Museum: This recently renovated museum includes accessible, interactive exhibits. Smell, see, hear, and feel aspects of the gold rush adventure. The exhibits include artifacts from the park’s collection, video clips, maps, photographs, and dioramas. Moore House Museum: This facility is wheelchair accessible and service animals are welcome. This building does not have restrooms. Jeff. Smith’s Parlor Museum: This facility is wheelchair accessible. This building does not have restrooms. Pantheon Saloon & Jr. Ranger Activity Center: Located in the restored Pantheon Saloon building, the Jr. Ranger Activity Center provides educational, tactile, interactive experiences in a fun, family friendly environment. This facility is wheelchair accessible. Chilkoot Trail Center: This trail does not appear to be wheelchair accessible. For those interested in further information about hiking on the trail, see the website for details. Dyea Campground: This campground appears to be appropriate only for healthy individuals who appreciate primitive outdoor life. Campers are advised to bring drinking water and firewood. Pit toilets, fire rings, picnic tables, and garbage receptacles are provided.
Lake Clark National Park & Preserve, Port Alsworth, Alaska https://www.nps.gov/lacl/planyourvisit/index.htm (907) 781-2117 https://www.facebook.com/LakeClarkNPS Lake Clark National Park and Preserve is a remote, rugged, wilderness park. Lake Clark National Park is a land of stunning beauty where volcanoes steam, salmon run, bears forage, craggy mountains reflect in shimmering turquoise lakes, and local people and culture still depend on the land and water of their home. Solitude is found around every bend in the river and shoulder of a mountain. Venture into the park to become part of the wilderness. Your visit to Lake Clark might include a quiet moment watching coastal Alaskan brown bears graze on the protein rich sedges at Silver Salmon Creek or Chinitna Bay, birdwatching, biking, camping/backpacking; day hiking, fishing, hunting, kayaking/canoeing; power boating and rafting. The park’s Visitor Center is located in Port Alsworth, Alaska, a small community on the shores of Lake Clark. The Visitor Center has an accessibility ramp and an all-terrain wheelchair, suited to the unpaved nature of Port Alsworth, available for loan. Access to the Park is via small airplane. Please call our office in Port Alsworth to discuss your individual needs at (907) 781-2218.
ARIZONA

 

https://www.facebook.com/arizonatravel

Arizona is one of the Four Corners states. It has borders with New Mexico, Utah, Nevada, California, and Mexico, and one point in common with the southwestern corner of Colorado. Arizona is the 48th state and last of the contiguous states to be admitted to the Union, achieving statehood on February 14, 1912. Arizona is home to the largest number of speakers of Native American languages in the 48 contiguous states, as over 85,000 individuals reported speaking Navajo and 10,403 people reported Apache, as a language spoken at home in 2005. Arizona has 22 National Parks, 1 National Heritage Park, 2 National Trails managed by the NPS, 45 National Historical Landmarks, and 10 National Natural Landmarks.

Arizona includes people of all abilities, including those with mobility, visual, and hearing needs. Many of the state’s lodging facilities, attractions, and events are ADA compliant, meaning that they do their best to comply with the guidelines set forth by the Americans with Disabilities Act, which prohibits discrimination and ensures equal access to state and local government services, public accommodations, commercial facilities, and transportation.

Little Rock Zoo littlerockzoo.com 501.666.2406 Email:[email protected]  
Wild Wilderness Drive Through Safari wildwildernessdrivethroughsafari.com 479.736.8383 Email:[email protected]  
Phoenix Zoo phoenixzoo.org 602.286.3800 Email:[email protected]  
Wildlife World Zoo, Aquarium, and Safari Park wildlifeworld.com 623.935.9453 Email:[email protected]  
Chiricahua National Monument, Wilcox, Arizona https://www.nps.gov/chir/index.htm (520) 824-3560  

A visit to Chiricahua National Monument offers a range of activities and attractions. There is something for everyone. The park’s mild climate is suitable for a wide variety of outdoor activities throughout most of the year: day hiking, camping, picnicking, historic district tours, wildlife viewing, birding, nature photography, star gazing, and horseback riding (own stock). Chiricahua is now a fee free national park. Chiricahua National Monument is continually working to improve access so that everyone can experience this unique landscape. The Visitor Center building and restrooms are accessible. There is one accessible campsite at Bonita Canyon Campground (must be reserved ahead of visit). Bonita Creek is an accessible picnic area with a hardened trail to a nearby accessible restroom. An accessible picnic table is available at the Massai Point picnic area near the parking lot. If you have special needs or particular questions, please contact a staff member at (520) 824-3560 or email us using the form included on the website.

Grand Canyon, Grand Canyon, Arizona https://www.nps.gov/grca/planyourvisit/upload/accessibility-grca2012.pdf (928) 638-7888 https://www.facebook.com/GrandCanyonNationalPark

Take a moment to give a round of applause to the incredible natural wonder that is the Grand Canyon. It deserves heaps of praise, and a visit. Awe, and maybe a bit of existentialism, awaits you at the Grand Canyon’s edge. Deep and wide and layered in earthen colors of sand and sunset, the mere sight of it brings meaning to time. Whether you stop at the canyon for an hour or stay for a week, you’ll have plenty of ways to enjoy some adventure, recreation or just great views. (Note: The web URL above will take you to a pdf copy of the Accessibility Guide for the Grand Canyon which will most likely answer any questions regarding a visit.)

Navajo National Monument, Shonto, Arizona https://www.nps.gov/nava/index.htm (928) 672-2700  

The prehistoric Puebloan Ancestors built Tsegi Phase villages within the natural sandstone alcoves of our canyons. The resilient Ancestral Puebloans paved the way for current Native American groups in the Southwest region. These villages, which date from AD 1250 to 1300, thrill all who visit with original architectural elements such as roof beams, masonry walls, rock art, and hand and foot holds. Navajo National Monument is a non-fee park and consists of three non-contiguous monuments all located within the Navajo Nation in Northeastern Arizona. Betatakin and Keet Seel are open for visitation during the summer season which runs from Memorial Day to Labor Day. The Visitor Center and restrooms are wheelchair accessible. There are accessible parking spaces in the Visitor Center parking lot. The Sandal Trail is paved, but there are areas of uneven ground on the trail. The Sandal Trail is a half mile to Betatakin Overlook and a half mile back to the Visitor Center. The trail is one mile round trip. Trails at Navajo National Monument are very steep and therefore not wheelchair accessible.

Tumacácori National Historical Park, Tumacacori, Arizona https://www.nps.gov/tuma/index.htm 520) 377-5060 https://www.facebook.com/TumacacoriNHP Tumacácori sits at a cultural crossroads in the Santa Cruz River valley. Here O’odham, Yaqui, and Apache people met and mingled with European Jesuit and Franciscan missionaries, settlers, and soldiers, sometimes in conflict and sometimes in cooperation. Follow the timeworn paths and discover stories that connect us to enduring relationships, vibrant cultures, and traditions of long ago. Note: “Missions” were basically farms. Although the priests’ primary goal of the mission system was to convert native souls to Catholicism, the success or failure of each mission depended heavily on its ability to sustain its own food supply. Fields of winter wheat, livestock grazing areas, orchards, and gardens were essential to a successful missionization of the New World. After all, of what use was an empire that still existed as a “wilderness?” The Visitor Center, museum, restrooms, and the mission grounds are fully wheelchair accessible.
ARKANSAS

Water. That’s what first attracted people, and they have been coming here ever since to use these soothing thermal waters to heal and relax. Rich and poor alike came for the baths, and a thriving city built up around the hot springs. Together nicknamed “The American Spa,” Hot Springs National Park today surrounds the north end of the city of Hot Springs, Arkansas. Once a state with a cashless society in the uplands and plantation agriculture in the lowlands, Arkansas’s economy has evolved and diversified. As of 2014, Arkansas was found to be the most affordable U.S. state to live in. The state is the U.S.’s largest producer of rice, broilers (chickens), and turkeys, and ranks in the top three for cotton, pullets (chickens), and aquaculture (catfish). Arkansas has 7 National Parks, 1 Wild & Scenic River managed by the NPS, 1 National Trail managed by the NPS, 16 National Historical Landmarks, and 5 National Natural Landmarks.

Fort Smith National Historic Site (AR, OK) https://www.nps.gov/fosm/index.htm (479) 783-3961 https://www.facebook.com/FortSmithNPS

There are many exhibits, features, and other noteworthy items/places available to view and experience at the Fort Smith National Historic Site, but depending on your schedule and interest, you may only have time for a brief visit. Explore life on the edge of Indian Territory through the stories of soldiers, the Trail of Tears, dangerous outlaws, and the brave lawmen who pursued them. If you have less than one hour: Tour the building, which includes Two Jails, Judge Parker’s Court Room, Exhibits on the U.S. Deputy Marshals, the Military Outlaws, and Trail of Tears. Visit the Gallows. Exhibits in the Visitor Center focus on Fort Smith’s military history from 1817 – 1871, western expansion, Judge Isaac C. Parker and the federal court’s impact on Indian Territory, U.S. Deputy Marshals and outlaws, Federal Indian policy, and Indian Removal including the Trail of Tears. If you have one to three hours: Attend a Ranger-led program. Take a walking tour using Audio Wands (available for free at the Front Desk) of both the building and the grounds. Walk the grounds and read our Wayside Information Panels. Walk along the Arkansas River and view the Trail of Tears Overlook. Enjoy a picnic under one of the many shade trees or on one of our picnic tables located next to the main parking lot. Visit the Commissary Storehouse, Fort Smith’s oldest building. Watch the beautiful sunsets on Belle Point overlooking the confluence of the Arkansas and Poteau Rivers. Watch It Took Brave Men, a U.S. Deputy Marshal video. See what is growing in the Historic Officer’s Garden. The Fort Smith National Historic Site takes great pride in its accessibility for disabled visitors. The Visitors’ Center is fully wheelchair accessible, and also houses one wheelchair for visitor use if needed. Audio wands are available to all visitors free of charge, and the audio program provides a description of almost all of our exhibits within the visitor center as well as on the walking tour of the outside wayside exhibits.

Hot Springs National Park, Hot Springs, Arkansas https://www.nps.gov/hosp/ (501) 620-6715 https://www.facebook.com/HotSpringsNPS/

Hot Springs National Park was once known as Hot Springs Reservation. It was set aside in 1832 to protect the Park’s primary resource, the hot springs. This type of Reservation was an early version of the National Park idea. Hot Springs was actually the first area in the United States to be set aside for its natural features. After Yellowstone was formed in 1872, Hot Springs was managed with it. In 1916 the National Park Service was formed and in 1921, Hot Springs Reservation changed its name to Hot Springs National Park, making it the 18th National Park in the Service. The Fordyce Bathhouse was the largest and most luxurious bathhouse on Bathhouse Row with its Italian marble walls and partitions, large stained glass windows and decorative ceilings. All bathhouses are accessible via ramps. The museum has an elevator for wheelchairs. Vehicle access is possible to the Tower, and then an elevator is available for individuals in wheelchairs.

National Historic Trail – Trail of Tears (AL, AR, GA, IL, KY, MO, NC, OK, TN) https://www.nps.gov/trte/index.htm (505) 988-6098 No Facebook connection was found on the website.

Remember and commemorate the survival of the Cherokee people, forcefully removed from their homelands in Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee to live in Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail passes through the present-day states of Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Tennessee. A complete summary is set forth under the state of Alabama, one of the origins of the Trail.

Pea Ridge National Military Park, Garfield, Arkansas https://www.nps.gov/peri/index.htm (479) 451-8122 https://www.facebook.com/Pea-Ridge-National-Military-Park-221857251198706/

On March 7-8, 1862, 26,000 soldiers fought here to decide the fate of Missouri and the West. The 4,300 acre battlefield honors those who fought for their beliefs. Pea Ridge was one of the most pivotal Civil War battles and is the most intact Civil War battlefield in the United States. The story of the Battle of Pea Ridge is not just about generals and tactics. It is about the volunteer soldiers who fought here, from both sides. It is about the civilians who saw a battle rage in their fields and wounded men brought to their homes. View biographies of the battle’s leaders, or read excerpts from letters and diaries of soldiers (these can be found on the website). Take an online tour of the Pea Ridge battlefield (see website). The Park Visitor Center is accessible. The park film, Thunder In the Ozarks, has been captioned for the hearing impaired. The park tour road and most tour stops are accessible. The Elkhorn Tavern and all hiking trails are historic and not fully accessible. Park wayside exhibits meet NPS-ADA standards.

CALIFORNIA

California’s diverse geography ranges from the Pacific Coast in the west to the Sierra Nevada mountain range in the east; and from the redwood-Douglas fir forests in the northwest to the Mojave Desert in the southeast. The Central Valley, a major agricultural area, dominates the state’s center. It is also regarded as a global trendsetter in both popular culture and politics, and is the origin of the film industry, the hippie counterculture, the Internet and the personal computer, among others. California has 28 National Parks, 9 Wild & Scenic Rivers managed by the NPS, 4 National Trails managed by the NPS, 145 National Historical Landmarks, 36 National Natural Landmarks, and 2 World Historic Sites.

San Diego Zoo and San Diego Wild Animal Park zoo.sandiegozoo.org sdzsafaripark.org 619.231.1575 760.747.8702 Email:[email protected]  
SeaWorld San Diego seaworldparks.com/en/seaworld-sandiego 800.257.4268 Email:[email protected]  
Steinhart Aquarium (California Academy of Sciences) calacademy.org/accessibility 415.379.8000 Email:[email protected]  
Los Angeles Zoo & Botanical Gardens www.lazoo.org (323) 644-4200 www.facebook.com/LosAngelesZoo
Los Angeles Aquarium aquariumofpacific.org/visit/discounts/aquariumzoocombo www.facebook.com/AquariumofthePacific/ 562) 590-3100 [email protected]
California National Historic Trail (CA, CO, ID, KS, MO, NE, NV, OR, UT, WY) https://www.nps.gov/cali/index.htm (801) 741-1012 https://www.facebook.com/oregoncalifornianps

Go West! Between 1841 and 1869, more than a quarter million people answered this call and crossed the plains and mountains to the West. These emigrants started their journeys in Kansas and Missouri, walking more than 2,000 miles for months in pursuit of a better life. The California and Oregon Trails follow the same route until Idaho, where they diverge, the California Trail heading to California and the Oregon Trail turning north to Oregon. More than 1,000 miles of trail ruts and traces can still be seen across 10 states on the California National Historic Trail. Today, the California Trail still beckons the adventurous and modern highways overlay much of the route. These corridors near the original trail route are called Auto Tour Routes. Follow these Routes to travel in the footsteps of these rugged pioneers. Some sites may provide accessible trails or pathways for touring an area. A variety of visitor centers along the trail provide video and audio programs, and occasionally tactile or interactive exhibits. “Places to Go” on the website offers site listings by state that include site name, address, phone number, access, historical significance, onsite interpretation, and website (https://www.nps.gov/cali/planyourvisit/placestogo.htm).

Channel Islands National Park, Ventura, California https://www.nps.gov/CHIS/planyourvisit/index.htm (805) 658-5730 https://www.facebook.com/channelislandsnps

Channel Islands National Park encompasses five remarkable islands and their ocean environment, preserving and protecting a wealth of natural and cultural resources. Isolation over thousands of years has created unique animals, plants, and archeological resources found nowhere else on earth and helped preserve a place where visitors can experience coastal southern California as it once was. California is now known for its surfing culture, especially among youngsters. For those who can appreciate (and prefer) wild beaches, this is the place to spend an entire weekend.

The mainland Visitor Center is accessible for visitors with special needs; visitors may view a park film (viewing options available depending on disability), numerous exhibits are tactile throughout the Visitor Center, and hearing devices are available by loan. However, due to their isolation and transportation requirements, the islands are not readily accessible for individuals in wheelchairs or those with limited mobility. Limited wheelchair access is available on the park concessioner boats and planes. See https://www.nps.gov/chis/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm for general information.

Death Valley National Park, Death Valley, California https://www.nps.gov/deva/index.htm (760) 786-3200 https://www.facebook.com/DeathValleyNP

Despite its ominous and seemingly foreboding name, Death Valley is by far one of the most sought after destinations in California. Death Valley National Park straddles eastern California and Nevada. It’s known for Titus Canyon, with a ghost town and colorful rocks, and Badwater Basin’s salt flats, North America’s lowest point. Many facilities in Death Valley National Park were built prior to current accessibility standards. Many facilities described in this guide are negotiable, but may not fully meet federal standards. The InterAgency Access Passport, available at the Furnace Creek Visitor Center, Stovepipe Wells Ranger Station, and Scotty’s Castle, waives entrance fees for permanently disabled individuals who are residents of the United States. The heat is trying in Death Valley as it is one of the driest places on Earth, but it is worth every drop of sweat. See https://www.nps.gov/deva/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm for more information.

Lassen Volcanic National Park, Mineral, California https://www.nps.gov/lavo/index.htm (530) 595-4480 https://www.facebook.com/LassenNPS

While Yellow Stone in Wyoming is more popular, Lassen Volcanic Park is no less than incredible. It is a geology buff’s greatest dream to be within a few meters of geysers and massive rocks that have been ejected from the volcano. The view is quite stunning and you can spend hours just admiring the vast expanse of the park. Lassen Volcanic National Park is a scenic and wondrous place to visit, with bubbling mudpots, wildflower-carpeted meadows, and jagged volcanic peaks. Lassen strives for full and equal participation for all visitors. See the Lassen Volcanic Accessibility Guide available on the website (https://www.nps.gov/lavo/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm).

Pony Express National Historic Trail (CA, CO, KS, MO, NE, NV, UT, WY) https://www.nps.gov/poex/index.htm (801) 741-1012 (NM; office of National Trails Intermountain Region) https://www.facebook.com/PonyExpressNPS It is hard to believe that young men once rode horses to carry mail from Missouri to California in the unprecedented time of only 10 days. This relay system along the Pony Express National Historic Trail in eight states was the most direct and practical means of east-west communications before the telegraph. Trip planning along the trail can be challenging given the vast number of land jurisdictions the trail passes through. We recommend contacting the nearest visitors and convention bureau to where you plan to visit for each day you are traveling along the trail or contact the individual sites or parks directly. Our Auto Tour Route guides provide detailed information to help you plan your visit. The Trip Itineraries page offers state or regional trips - come back to this page often as we amass more trip itineraries for you. Use these resources to plan your visit to the Pony Express National Historic Trail https://www.nps.gov/poex/planyourvisit/index.htm.
Redwood National Park, Del Norte and Humboldt Counties, California https://www.nps.gov/redw/index.htm (707) 465-7335 https://www.facebook.com/RedwoodNPS

Redwood National & State Parks in the north county, or along the Avenue of the Giants and Humboldt Redwoods State Park in the south county -- these two jewels adorn a crown studded with many other parks, forests, preserves and beaches, making Humboldt County a paradise for nature lovers and outdoor recreation. Fishing, kayaking, biking, rafting, backpacking, birding and more are all pursued avidly on the Redwood Coast. Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park, Del Norte Coast Redwoods State Park, and Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park were created by the State of California in the 1920s to protect some of the finest remaining examples of coast redwoods. In 1968, The Redwood National Park was joined with the other three parks to be managed by the National Park Service and to protect the remaining redwoods. Together, these parks are recognized as both a World Heritage Site and an International Biosphere Reserve. All Visitor Centers are physically accessible to wheelchair users. Wheelchairs for loan are available from the Crescent City Information Center. Beach wheelchairs are available for loan at Gold Bluffs Beach and the Crescent City Information Center. There are two accessible campgrounds, two trails, and nine accessible picnic areas. Follow this link for information about accessibility at national parks in California: https://www.nps.gov/aboutus/accessibility.htm.

Yosemite National Park, the Sierra Nevada, California https://www.nps.gov/yose/index.htm (209) 372-0200 https://www.facebook.com/YosemiteNPS

Whether you are looking for great looking valleys, mammoth granite, or just the most majestic view, you can never go wrong with the Golden State’s best feature, Yosemite national park. The park also offers a free fully accessible shuttle bus service in Yosemite Valley to all park visitors. For more information, download the park’s accessibility guide, which describes access to areas, facilities, and services for people with disabilities: https://www.nps.gov/yose/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm.

COLORADO

Colorado is nicknamed the “Centennial State” because it became a state in the same year as the centennial of the United States Declaration of Independence (1776). The state was named for the Colorado River, which Spanish travelers named the Río Colorado for the ruddy (reddish) colored (Spanish: Colorado) silt the river carried from the mountains. Colorado’s four National Parks — Rocky Mountain, Mesa Verde, Great Sand Dunes and Black Canyon of the Gunnison — are home to some of the world’s most wondrous and diverse scenery. And since the National Park Service celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2016, there’s no better time to experience all there is to see and do at National Parks in Colorado. Colorado has 13 National Parks, 3 Natural Heritage Areas, 1 Wild & Scenic River managed by the NPS, 4 National Trails managed by the NPS, 25 National Historic Landmarks, and 14 National Natural Landmarks.

Cheyenne Mountain Zoo cmzoo.org 719.424.7821 Email:[email protected]  
Denver Zoological Gardens denverzoo.org 720.337.1400 Email:[email protected]  
Downtown Aquarium aquariumrestaurants.com/downtownaquariumdenver/visitorInfo.asp 303.561.4450 [email protected]  
Black Canyon of the Gunnison, Montrose, Colorado https://www.nps.gov/blca/index.htm (970) 641-2337 x205 https://www.facebook.com/blackcanyonnps

Big enough to be overwhelming, still intimate enough to feel the pulse of time, Black Canyon of the Gunnison exposes you to some of the steepest cliffs, oldest rock, and craggiest spires in North America. With two million years to work, the Gunnison River, along with the forces of weathering, has sculpted this vertical wilderness of rock, water, and sky. Hiking, fishing, camping, kayaking, and wild life watching are just a few of the activities available at the park. The following facilities are accessible to those with mobility impairments:

SOUTH RIM South Rim Visitor Center Restrooms along South Rim South Rim Campground - 2 accessible camping sites, restrooms Tomichi Point Overlook Chasm View Overlook Sunset View Overlook

NORTH RIM Restroom at North Rim Ranger Station; and Balanced Rock Overlook

California National Historic Trail (CA, CO, ID, KS, MO, NE, NV, OR, UT, WY) https://www.nps.gov/cali/index.htm (801) 741-1012 https://www.facebook.com/oregoncalifornianps Go West! Between 1841 and 1869, more than a quarter million people answered this call and crossed the plains and mountains to the West. These emigrants started their journeys in Kansas and Missouri, walking more than 2,000 miles for months in pursuit of a better life. The California and Oregon Trails follow the same route until Idaho, where they diverge, the Oregon Trail turning north to Oregon and the California Trail heading to California. A variety of Visitor Centers along the trail provide video and audio programs, and occasionally tactile or interactive exhibits. “Places to Go” on the website offers site listings by state with more specifics. A complete summary is set forth under the state of California, the final destination of the trail.
Great Sand Dunes National Park, Mosca, Colorado https://www.nps.gov/grsa/index.htm (719) 378-6395 https://www.facebook.com/greatsanddunesnpp

The tallest dunes in North America are the centerpiece in a diverse landscape of grasslands, wetlands, conifer and aspen forests, alpine lakes, and tundra. Experience this diversity through hiking, sand sledding, splashing in Medano Creek, wildlife watching, and more! Your visit can be more enjoyable when you better understand the environment around you. Ranger programs are offered most days from late May through October, and occasionally during other times of the year. See the following website link https://www.nps.gov/grsa/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm for additional details concerning accessibility options in the dunes park.

Mesa Verde National Park, Cortez and Mancos, Colorado https://www.nps.gov/meve/index.htm (970) 529-4465 https://www.facebook.com/mesaverdenps

Mesa Verde, Spanish for green table, offers a spectacular look into the lives of the Ancestral Pueblo people who made it their home for over 700 years, from AD 600 to 1300. Mesa Verde is famous for the Ancestral Puebloan cliff dwellings constructed within its cliff alcoves. Today the park protects nearly 5,000 known archeological sites, including 600 cliff dwellings. These sites are some of the most notable and best preserved in the United States. Check out the cliff dwellings page to find out what sites are open, and whether they are available on a self-guided or guided-tour-only basis. You can also watch videos on the website to help you decide which cliff dwelling you’d like to visit. Mesa Verde National Park has some accessibility limitations for people with vision, hearing, or mobility impairments (see details on the website).

Pony Express National Historic Trail (CA, CO, KS, MO, NE, NV, UT, WY) https://www.nps.gov/poex/index.htm (801) 741-1012 (NM; office of National Trails Intermountain Region) https://www.facebook.com/PonyExpressNPS

It is hard to believe that young men once rode horses to carry mail from Missouri to California in the unprecedented time of only 10 days. This relay system along the Pony Express National Historic Trail in eight states was the most direct and practical means of east-west communications before the telegraph. A complete summary of this trail is included under the state of Missouri, the origin of the trail.

Rocky Mountain National Park, Estes Park and Grand Lake, Colorado https://www.nps.gov/romo/index.htm (970) 586-1206 https://www.facebook.com/RockyNPS

Welcome to Rocky Mountain National Park. This beautiful park has many accessible facilities for visitors, including Visitor Centers, scenic overlooks, self-guided trails, campgrounds, some picnic areas and a backcountry campsite. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, wheelchairs are permitted on all trails. The America the Beautiful Access Pass is a free lifetime pass for US citizens who have a permanent disability. Bear Lake Trail, Coyote Valley Trail, Lily Lake Trail and the Sprague Lake Trail are all wheelchair accessible. Both “front country” and “back country” camping are available. A good place to look for information on accessibility is the Disabled Traveler’s Companion website (http://tdtcompanion.com/). Working in cooperation with Rocky Mountain National Park and other National Parks to provide valuable trip planning assistance to disabled travelers, this website contains information and photographs which may help you plan your visit to Rocky Mountain National Park.

CONNECTICUT

Connecticut is also often grouped along with New York and New Jersey as the Tri-State Area. The state is named for the Connecticut, a major U.S. river that approximately bisects the state. The word “Connecticut” is derived from various anglicized spellings of an Algonquian word for “long tidal river.” Connecticut ratified the U.S. Constitution on January 9, 1788, becoming the fifth state. When World War I broke out in 1914, Connecticut became a major supplier of weaponry to the U.S. military; by 1918, 80% of the state’s industries were producing goods for the war effort. Remington Arms in Bridgeport produced half the small-arms cartridges used by the U.S. Army, with other major suppliers including Winchester in New Haven and Colt in Hartford. Connecticut was also an important U.S. Navy supplier, with Electric Boat receiving orders for 85 submarines, Lake Torpedo Boat building more than 20 subs, and the Groton Iron Works building freighters. On June 21, 1916, the U.S. Navy made Groton the site for its East Coast submarine base and school. Manufacturing is the third biggest industry at 11.9% of GDP and dominated by Hartford-based United Technologies Corporation (UTC), which employs more than 22,000 people in Connecticut. Lockheed Martin subsidiary Sikorsky Aircraft operates Connecticut’s single largest manufacturing plant in Stratford, where it makes helicopters. Other UTC divisions include UTC Propulsion and Aerospace Systems, including jet engine manufacturer Pratt & Whitney and UTC Building and Industrial Systems. Other major manufacturers include the Electric Boat division of General Dynamics, which makes submarines in Groton, and Boehringer Ingelheim, a pharmaceuticals manufacturer with its U.S. headquarters in Ridgefield. Connecticut historically was a center of gun manufacturing, and four gun-manufacturing firms continued to operate in the state as of December 2012: Colt, Stag, Ruger, and Mossberg. Marlin, owned by Remington, closed in April 2011.

Prescott Bush represented Connecticut in the U.S. Senate from 1952 to 1963; his son George H. W. Bush and grandson George W. Bush both became Presidents of the United States. As of the 2010 Census, Connecticut featured the highest per-capita income, Human Development Index, and median household income in the United States. However, Connecticut had the second largest gap nationwide between the average incomes of the top 1 percent and the average incomes of the bottom 99 percent. Connecticut has 2 National Parks, 2 National Heritage Areas, 2 Wild & Scenic Rivers managed by the NPS, and 3 National Trails managed by the NPS.

Beardsley Zoo beardsleyzoo.com 203.394.6565 Email:[email protected]  
Mystic Aquarium mysticaquarium.org 860.572.5955 Email:[email protected]  
Appalachian National Scenic Trail (CT, GA, MA, MD, ME, NC, NH, NJ, NY, PA, TN VA, VT, WV) https://www.nps.gov/appa/index.htm (304) 535-6278 (Harpers Ferry, WV) No Facebook connection found on home page.

Conceived in 1921, built by private citizens, and completed in 1937, today the Appalachian Trail is managed by the National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, numerous state agencies and thousands of volunteers. The Appalachian Trail is a 2,180+ mile long public footpath that traverses the scenic, wooded, pastoral, wild, and culturally resonant lands of the Appalachian Mountains from Georgia to Maine. The Appalachian National Scenic Trail does not currently have a visitor center. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy, a national not-for-profit corporation, has a Visitor Center in Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. The Appalachian Trail has been enjoyed by visitors with a variety of disabilities - including the blind, hearing-impaired, and hikers with a range of mobility limitations. The trail is not highly developed though, and there are only a few sections that are considered fully accessible.

The Last Green Valley National Heritage Corridor (CT and MA) http://thelastgreenvalley.org/index.php ,http://thelastgreenvalley.org/tlgv/a-national-heritage-corridor/ (860) 774-3300 https://www.facebook.com/pg/LastGreenValley/photos/?ref=page_internal

The Last Green Valley is not a traditional park. The Last Green Valley is the 35town National Heritage Corridor in eastern Connecticut and south-central Massachusetts and has a total population of about 300,000. Congress designated The Last Green Valley as a National Heritage Corridor in 1994. Citizens, businesses, nonprofit cultural and environmental organizations, local and state governments, and the National Park Service work together to preserve and celebrate the region’s cultural, historical and natural heritage. The Last Green Valley is a large area with things to do for all family members (http://thelastgreenvalley.org/explore-the-last-green-valley/100-fun-thin...).

Washington-Rochambeau National Historic Trail (CT, DC, DE, MA, MD, NJ, NY, PA, RI, VA) https://www.nps.gov/waro/index.htm (215) 597-1581 https://www.facebook.com/Washington-Rochambeau-Revolutionary-Route-Natio...

In 1781, General Rochambeau’s French Army joined forces with General Washington’s Continental Army to fight the British Army in Yorktown, Virginia. With the French Navy in support, the allied armies moved hundreds of miles to become the largest troop movement of the American Revolution. The effort and cooperation between the two sides led to a victory at Yorktown and secured American independence. Rochambeau’s march north from July 1782 provided Americans an opportunity to give thanks to their country’s ally, for when the French infantry sailed out of Boston Harbor on Christmas Day 1782, King George III and Parliament had acknowledged the United States “to be free Sovereign and independent States.”

The Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historical Trail is over 680 miles of land and water trails that pass through nine states along the eastern coast of the United States. The trail’s large geographic presence serves to connect major metropolitan areas, national and state parks, historic and scenic trails, and countless other historic sites. Visitors can follow the route by exploring these different sites along the trail. Use the links on the website that list each state to find sites that interpret the trail according to state. More information can also be found through our partner organization, the National Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Association, Inc. at W3R-US.org.

Weir Farm National Historic Site, Ridgefield and Wilton, Connecticut https://www.nps.gov/wefa/index.htm (203) 834-1896, ext. 0 https://www.facebook.com/WeirFarmNHS

There is no fee to visit Weir Farm. There are lots of things for kids to do and discover at Weir Farm National Historic Site. Junior Ranger activities will help them get started. Find inspiration here for your next sketch or painting. Artists of all abilities are encouraged work on site. Designed and preserved by artists, Weir Farm National Historic Site welcomes everyone to experience the power of creativity, art, and nature. Escape to the only national park dedicated to American painting and rediscover the beauty of light and color in everyday life. For people with mobility impairments: (1) The Burlingham House Visitor Center is accessible with temporary ramps for wheelchair users. Please call ahead so the Park Ranger will know to set up the ramps. (2) All public restrooms are accessible. (3) A wheelchair is available at the Burlingham House Visitor Center. (4) The Weir Studio and the Young Studio are not wheelchair accessible. (5) The Weir House is wheelchair accessible and can be entered on guided tour. In an effort to address barriers to accessibility and to better ensure that all people have an equal opportunity to enjoy Weir Farm National Historic Site, please call ahead if you have any special needs.

DELAWARE

Delaware was one of the 13 colonies participating in the American Revolution. On December 7, 1787, Delaware became the first state to ratify the Constitution of the United States, and has since promoted itself as “The First State”. Dover Air Force Base, located next to the state capital of Dover, is one of the largest Air Force bases in the country and is a major employer in Delaware.

Dover Air Force Base is home to the 436th Airlift Wing of the Air Mobility Command (AMC), known as the “Eagle Wing,” and the AMC-gained 512th Airlift Wing of the Air Force Reserve Command, referred to as the “Liberty Wing.”

In addition to its other responsibilities in the United States Air Force Mobility Command, this air base serves as the entry point and mortuary for American military personnel and some U.S. government civilians who die overseas. More than 50% of all U.S. publicly traded companies and 63% of the Fortune 500 are incorporated in Delaware, largely because of its business-friendly corporation law. The Delaware Transit Corporation (branded as “DART First State,” the state government public transportation organization), was named “Most Outstanding Public Transportation System” in 2003 by the American Public Transportation Association. Delaware has 1 National Park, 1 Wild & Scenic River managed by the NPS, 13 National Historic Landmarks, and 1 National Trail managed by the NPS.

Beaver Valley, Wilmington, Delaware https://www.nps.gov/frst/planyourvisit/beaver-valley.htm and http://www.destateparks.com/park/brandywine-creek/nature-center.asp (302) 544-6363 or (302) 655-5740  

Beaver Valley consists of 1,100 acres of rolling hills and wooded areas located along the Brandywine River, and has just over 200 acres that cross the arched border into southern Pennsylvania. This land was first deeded to William Penn and reflects early Quaker settlement patterns and Native American migration. In 1906, William Bancroft purchased this bucolic property to preserve the beauty of the Brandywine Valley for future generations. Since then, it served as a privately-owned park until donated to the National Park Service in 2013. The Beaver Valley area is now contained in and operated under Brandywine Creek State Park. The Beaver Valley area is located at 4501 Thompson Bridge Road, Wilmington, DE, (302) 577-7756. Visit the Nature Center at Adjacent Brandywine Creek State Park. All recreational areas and trails are open daily, sunrise to sunset, and some are wheelchair accessible. Call the park for specifics on accessibility. For the Beaver Valley cancellation stamp and additional information about the area, visit the Brandywine Creek State Park Nature Center on Adams Dam road.

First State National Historical Park, New Castle, Delaware https://www.nps.gov/frst/index.htm (302) 544-6363. This phone number is not staffed. You can leave a message on the park’s main phone number and we will return your call as soon as possible. If you are visiting one of the seven sites, and need specific information, please refer to the “Places to Go” page for phone numbers and addresses of each site. https://www.facebook.com/firststatenhp

Famous as the First State to ratify the Constitution, Delaware was born out of a conflict among three world powers for dominance of the Delaware Valley. From this beginning, the region developed a distinct character that tolerated diversity in religion and national origin and valued independence. First State National Historical Park (NHP) is a newer national park unit and is made up of seven sites spread throughout the entire state of Delaware. The park focuses on the story of first settlement through the ratification of the United State Constitution. First State NHP does not currently have one central visitor center, but each of the seven locations do have some type of welcome center where you can receive general information about the site, discover the unique history that each has to offer, and learn about available tours.

Fort Christina National Historical Landmark, Wilmington, Delaware https://www.nps.gov/frst/planyourvisit/fort-christina.htm (302) 544-6363  

It was here, along the banks of the Christina River over 375 years ago, that the first Swedish and Finnish American settlers aboard the Kalmar Nyckel and the Fogel Grip landed and settled the first American Swedish colony, New Sweden. Fort Christina was quickly built and named for the Queen of Sweden at the time. The wharf of rocks that was the site of the first landing remains, however, some believe archeological digs at the site could uncover much more. To learn more about accessibility, contact the individual sites below:

John Dickinson Plantation, Dover, Delaware https://www.nps.gov/frst/planyourvisit/john-dickinson-plantation.htm (302) 739-3277  

Home to John Dickinson, known as the “penman of the Revolution” because his writings helped inspire colonial opposition to Great Britain, this site was built in 1739 and located about 6 miles southeast of The Green in Dover. John Dickinson was also a member of the Continental Congress that wrote the Declaration of the Independence, and a delegate to the Constitutional Convention. After John Dickinson’s death, President Thomas Jefferson wrote that Dickinson was “Among the first of the advocates for the rights of his country when assailed by Great Britain, he continued to the last the orthodox advocate of the true principles of our new government: and his name will be consecrated in history as one of the great worthies of the revolution.” The Visitor Center and the first floor of the mansion are accessible to people with disabilities.

New Castle Court House Museum, New Castle, Delaware http://history.delaware.gov/museums/ncch/ncch_main.shtml (302) 323-4453 https://www.facebook.com/NewCastleHistory/

The New Castle Court House Museum is located at 211 Delaware Street, New Castle, DE. Built in 1732, this building served as Delaware’s first court and state capitol. Here in 1776, New Castle, Kent, and Sussex counties declared their independence from Pennsylvania and England creating the Delaware State. The museum is open to the public and admission is free. Donations are appreciated. The first floor of the court house is accessible to people with disabilities.

Old Swedes Church, Wilmington, Delaware http://www.oldswedes.org/sites/ ; http://www.oldswedes.org/visitor-information/ (302) 652-5629   Welcome to Old Swedes Historic Site! Located near the landing site of the first Swedish settlers in the Delaware Valley, Old Swedes Foundation offers tours of Old Swedes Church, the Burial Grounds, and the historic Hendrickson House museum. Come visit us and see what life was like in the New Sweden Colony under the Swedish, Dutch, English, and American flags. Learn more about life in the Delaware colony in the years leading up to the American Revolution, and how it came to be known as The First State. We invite you to meander the labyrinth, and churchyard paths, where visitors can discover gravestones that relate four hundred years of American history. Visit us today and take a tour of the 1698-1699 church and the 18th century farmhouse where the story of the New Sweden Colony and its descendants comes alive! Note: Did not find accessibility information on the website.
Ryves Holt House, Lewes, Delaware https://www.nps.gov/frst/planyourvisit/ryves-holt-house.htm (302) 645-7670 (Lewes Historical Society)  

This house, built in 1665 in Lewes, Delaware by early Dutch settlers, is thought to be built thirty years after the destruction of the nearby ill-fated Zwaanendael colony, one of the first Dutch settlements in America, and first European settlement in Delaware. It survived the Lord Baltimore raids, which eventually led to the English taking control of the area. The house was purchased in 1723 by its namesake, Ryves Holt, who served as the first Chief Justice of Delaware from 1745 until his death in 1763. The Lewes Historical Society partners with the National Park Service at this site. Note: Did not find accessibility information on the website.

The Green, Dover, Delaware https://www.nps.gov/frst/planyourvisit/the-green-dover.htm (302) 739-9194  

William Penn established the town of Dover in 1683. As surveyed in 1717, the town featured three public squares including The Green, located at 121 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd., Dover, Delaware. Surrounded by government buildings, shops, homes, and taverns, The Green became the heart of Dover. During the American Revolution, it was the setting for troop reviews, markets, and public gatherings. On December 7, 1787 thirty delegates, ten from each county, met at the Golden Fleece Tavern facing The Green and ratified the United States Constitution, giving Delaware a place of honor as “The First State.” To learn more about accessibility, click on the following web URL: (http://www.destateparks.com/park/first-state-heritage/index.asp).

Washington-Rochambeau National Historic Trail (CT, DC, DE, MA, MD, NJ, NY, PA, RI, VA) https://www.nps.gov/waro/index.htm (215) 597-1581 https://www.facebook.com/Washington-Rochambeau-Revolutionary-Route-Natio...

In 1781, General Rochambeau’s French Army joined forces with General Washington’s Continental Army to fight the British Army in Yorktown, Virginia. With the French Navy in support, the allied armies moved hundreds of miles to become the largest troop movement of the American Revolution. The effort and cooperation between the two sides led to a victory at Yorktown and secured American independence. Rochambeau’s march north from July 1782 provided Americans an opportunity to give thanks to their country’s ally, for when the French infantry sailed out of Boston Harbor on Christmas Day 1782, King George III and Parliament had acknowledged the United States “to be free Sovereign and independent States.”

The Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historical Trail is over 680 miles of land and water trails that pass through nine states along the eastern coast of the United States. The trail’s large geographic presence serves to connect major metropolitan areas, national and state parks, historic and scenic trails, and countless other historic sites. Visitors can follow the route by exploring these different sites along the trail. Use the links on the website that listing each state to find sites that interpret the trail according to state. More information can also be found through our partner organization, the National Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Association, Inc. at W3R-US.org.

Brandywine Zoo brandywinezoo.org 302.571.7747 Email:[email protected]  
3 Palms Zoo palmszoo.org 302.715.1326 Email:[email protected]  
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, WASHINGTON D.C.

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as “Washington,” “the District,” or simply “D.C.,” is the capital of the United States. The U.S. Constitution provided for a federal district under the exclusive jurisdiction of the Congress and the District is therefore not a part of any state. Named in honor of President George Washington, the City of Washington was founded in 1791 to serve as the new national capital. The centers of all three branches of the federal government of the United States are in the District, including the Congress, President, and Supreme Court. Washington is home to many national monuments and museums, which are primarily situated on or around the National Mall. The National Archives houses thousands of documents important to American history including the Declaration of Independence, the United States Constitution, and the Bill of Rights. Located in three buildings on Capitol Hill, the Library of Congress is the largest library complex in the world with a collection of over 147 million books, manuscripts, and other materials. The Smithsonian Institution is an educational foundation chartered by Congress in 1846 that maintains most of the nation’s official museums and galleries in Washington, D.C. The U.S. government partially funds the Smithsonian and its collections are open to the public free of charge. Washington is one of 12 cities in the United States with teams from all four major professional men’s sports and is home to one major professional women’s team. In Washington, D.C., there are 25 National Parks, 4 National Trails managed by the NPS, and 74 National Historic Landmarks.

National Zoological Park nationalzoo.si.edu 202.633.4888 Email:[email protected]  
Ford’s Theater National Historic Site, Washington, D.C. https://www.nps.gov/foth/index.htm (202) 426-6924 https://www.facebook.com/fordstheatrenps

Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, was assassinated in Ford’s Theatre on April 14, 1865. The mortally wounded, but still breathing president was carried across the street to Petersen’s boarding house, where he remained unconscious through the night. On April 15, 1865, President Lincoln died in the Petersen House. First opened to the public in 1968, Ford’s Theatre National Historic Site protects the Theatre and Petersen House, houses a museum about the assassination, and is a working theater. Explore Ford’s Theatre; discover Abraham Lincoln’s life in Washington, D.C., the struggle for a united country, and the motivation behind Lincoln’s assassination. The National Park Service and the Ford’s Theatre Society present a variety of programs year round. Ford’s Theatre offers an elevator from the lower-level museum to the lobby and balcony levels. The Center for Education and Leadership also has an elevator to exhibit levels and to the back porch of the Petersen House. Accessible seating is offered in both the rear orchestra and the balcony sections of the theatre.

Lincoln Memorial, Washington, D.C. https://www.nps.gov/linc/index.htm (202) 426-6841 https://www.facebook.com/NationalMallNPS (Not specific to Lincoln Memorial)

The 19th foot tall statue of Lincoln gazes out from a solemn chamber in a building surrounded by 36 columns, each representing a state in the union at the time of the Lincoln’s death. Dedicated in 1922, the Lincoln Memorial is the most visited site on the National Mall. All of the major monuments and memorials are wheelchair accessible. Please review the website for specific accessibility issues and/or call the park prior to your visit. See the website for parking information; public transportation is recommended.

Martin Luther King, Jr., Memorial, Washington, D.C. https://www.nps.gov/mlkm/index.htm (202) 426-6841 https://www.facebook.com/NationalMallNPS (Not specific to MLK Memorial)

The memorial honors Martin Luther King, Jr.’s legacy and the struggle for freedom, equality, and justice. You may want to visit the Lincoln Memorial and find the spot on the steps where Martin Luther King, Jr. gave the “I Have a Dream” speech. National Mall and Memorial Parks are open 24 hours a day. The early evening and morning hours are beautiful and tranquil times to visit. All of the major monuments and memorials are wheelchair accessible. Please review the website for specific accessibility issues and/or call the park prior to your visit. See the website for parking information; public transportation is recommended.

National Mall and Memorial Parks, Washington, D.C. https://www.nps.gov/nama/index.htm (202) 426-6841 https://www.facebook.com/NationalMallNPS

National Mall and Memorial Parks protects the national mall and its iconic monuments and memorials and over 1,000 acres of greenspace in Washington, D.C. Come to visit the National Mall and stay to explore all that National Mall and Memorial Parks has to offer. Some of the Memorials on the National Mall include: Washington Memorial, Lincoln Memorial, World War II Memorial, Thomas Jefferson Memorial, Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial, Korean War Veterans Memorial, Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial, and the DC War (World War I) Memorial. There are other numerous memorials and historic sites located near the National Mall. (Note: The Washington Monument is currently closed to visitors to allow for modernization of the elevator. However, no date is given on the website, so visitors should contact the park for such information.) Please review the website for specific accessibility issues and/or call the park prior to your visit. Also see the website for parking information; public transportation is recommended.

President’s Park (White House), Washington, D.C. https://www.nps.gov/whho/index.htm (202) 208-1631 https://www.facebook.com/npspresidentspark/

White House (1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW) public tour requests must be submitted through one’s Member of Congress. These self-guided tours are generally available Tuesday through Saturday (excluding federal holidays or unless otherwise noted). Tours are scheduled on a first come, first served basis. Requests can be submitted up to three months in advance and no less than 21 days in advance. You are encouraged to submit your request as early as possible as a limited number of spaces are available. The White House tour is free of charge. Please note that White House tours may be subject to last minute cancellation. Visitors in wheelchairs, or with other mobility disabilities, use the same Visitors Entrance and are escorted by ramp from the entrance level to the Ground floor, and by elevator from the Ground floor to the State floor. Restrooms and public telephones are not available in the White House.

The White House Visitor Center, located at 1450 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, offers visitors a window into the president’s iconic home. The Visitor Center is open from 7:30 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. daily (except January 1, Thanksgiving, and December 25). Admission is free. Visitors can explore an interactive touchscreen tour of the White House, view over 90 artifacts from the White House collection, shop at the White House Historical Association retail store, and view the 14 minute film, “White House: Reflections From Within.” All new interactive and tactile exhibits offer visitors a greater chance to find their connection to the President’s House. For example, visitors will be able to touch tactile maps, pieces of stone used to construct the White House, and replicas of significant objects like the North Portico door knob. Visit the information desk to inquire about special ranger programs and events at President’s Park.

Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Washington, D.C. https://www.nps.gov/vive/index.htm (202) 426-6841 No Facebook connection was found on the website.

Honoring the men and women who served in the controversial Vietnam War, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial chronologically lists the names of more than 58,000 Americans (servicemen and women) who gave their lives in service to their country. The memorial also includes “The Three Servicemen” statue and the Vietnam Women’s Memorial. Accessibility is a top priority for National Mall and Memorial Parks. Many of our facilities are historic and accessibility is not always ideal. However, we are always working to improve accessibility. Please contact the park for specifics concerning wheelchair accessibility.

Washington-Rochambeau National Historic Trail (CT, DC, DE, MA, MD, NJ, NY, PA, RI, VA) https://www.nps.gov/waro/index.htm (215) 597-1581 https://www.facebook.com/Washington-Rochambeau-Revolutionary-Route-Natio...

In 1781, General Rochambeau’s French Army joined forces with General Washington’s Continental Army to fight the British Army in Yorktown, Virginia. With the French Navy in support, the allied armies moved hundreds of miles to become the largest troop movement of the American Revolution. The effort and cooperation between the two sides led to a victory at Yorktown and secured American independence. Rochambeau’s march north from July 1782 provided Americans an opportunity to give thanks to their country’s ally, for when the French infantry sailed out of Boston Harbor on Christmas Day 1782, King George III and Parliament had acknowledged the United States “to be free Sovereign and independent States.”

The Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historical Trail is over 680 miles of land and water trails that pass through nine states along the eastern coast of the United States. The trail’s large geographic presence serves to connect major metropolitan areas, national and state parks, historic and scenic trails, and countless other historic sites. Visitors can follow the route by exploring these different sites along the trail. Use the links on the website that listing each state to find sites that interpret the trail according to state. More information can also be found through our partner organization, the National Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Association, Inc. at W3R-US.org.

FLORIDA

With a population of more than 18 million according to the 2010 census, Florida is the most populous state in the Southeastern United States, and the fourth most populous in the United States. Jacksonville is estimated to be the 12th most populous city in the United States and is the largest city by area in the contiguous United States. Florida is distinctive for its large Cuban expatriate community and high population growth, as well as for its increasing environmental issues. Americans of English descent and Americans of Scots-Irish descent began moving into northern Florida from the backwoods of Georgia and South Carolina. Though technically not allowed by the Spanish authorities, the Spanish were never able to effectively police the border region and the backwoods settlers from the United States would continue to migrate into Florida unchecked. These migrants, mixing with the already present British settlers who had remained in Florida since the British period, would be the progenitors of the population known as Florida Crackers.

The state’s economy relies mainly on tourism, agriculture, and transportation, which developed in the late 19th century. Florida is also renowned for amusement parks, orange crops, the Kennedy Space Center, and as a popular destination for retirees. From the mangroves of the Everglades to the isolated and abandoned Fort Jefferson of the Dry Tortugas to the underwater spectacle of Biscayne, Florida’s national parks are unlike any others. Florida is home to 11 National Parks, 1 National Heritage Area, 2 Wild & Scenic Rivers managed by the NPS, 45 National Historic Landmarks, 18 National Natural Landmarks, and 1 World Heritage Site.

Busch Gardens Tampa Bay seaworldparks.com/en/buschgardens-tampa 888.800.5447 Email:[email protected]  
Monkey Jungle Island monkeyjungle.com 305.235.1611 Email:[email protected]  
SeaWorld Orlando seaworldparks.com/en/seaworld-orlando 888.800.5447 Email:[email protected]  
Biscayne National Park, Miami, Key Biscayne and Homestead, Florida https://www.nps.gov/bisc/index.htm (305) 230-1144 https://www.facebook.com/BiscayneNPS/

Within sight of downtown Miami, yet worlds away, Biscayne protects a rare combination of aquamarine waters, emerald islands, and fish-bejeweled coral reefs. Here too is evidence of 10,000 years of human history, from pirates and shipwrecks to pineapple farmers and presidents. Outdoors enthusiasts can boat, snorkel, camp, watch wildlife…or simply relax in a rocking chair gazing out over the bay. Biscayne National Park encompasses coral reefs, islands and shoreline mangrove forests in the northern Florida Keys. Its reefs and islands are accessible only by boat. Dolphins, turtles and pelicans live in Biscayne Bay Lagoon. The underwater Maritime Heritage Trail links dive sites, most of them shipwrecks. On Boca Chita Key, Boca Chita Lighthouse has coastal views. A museum at Convoy Point explains local ecosystems. On the mainland, the Dante Fascell Visitor Center and park headquarters are located at Convoy Point, and ramps, elevators and boardwalks make these areas fully accessible to those with mobility challenges. On the islands – on Boca Chita Key, Elliott Key and Adams Key, restrooms are accessible, but some of the buildings are not. There are no sidewalks on Elliott Key or Adams Key, but Boca Chita Key does have sidewalks around the harbor and to the restrooms, but the remainder of the island is lawn and rocky ground.

Dry Tortugas National Park and Fort Jefferson, Key West, Florida https://www.nps.gov/drto/index.htm (305) 242-7700 https://www.facebook.com/drytortugasNPS/

Almost 70 miles west of Key West lies the remote Dry Tortugas National Park. The 100-square mile park is mostly open water with seven small islands. Accessible only by your personal boat, a charter boat, ferries, or seaplanes, the park is known the world over as the home of magnificent Fort Jefferson, picturesque blue waters, superlative coral reefs and marine life, and the vast assortment of bird life that frequent the area. The Dry Tortugas National Park has charters like the Yankee Freedom which has lifts at the dock to help people onto the boat in Key West. Visitors need to give advance notice to get it setup for passengers in need of accessibility. There is a ramp at the Fort Jefferson dock in which a power chair/wheelchair can disembark from the boat. The 19th century brick fort has three floors and wheelchairs are not able to get to the second and third tier. The fort is accessible only on the first tier on the grass surface or the brick walkway as well as the trail on the outside of the fort.

Everglades National Park, Miami, Naples and Homestead, Florida https://www.nps.gov/ever/index.htm (305) 242-7700 https://www.facebook.com/EvergladesNationalPark/

Everglades National Park covers 1.5 million acres of South Florida and spans 3 counties - Monroe, Miami-Dade, and Collier. Everglades National Park strives to make the park accessible to everyone. The park offers a variety of accessible facilities, services and programs including back country camping, front country camping, boat tours, and assistive learning devices. All of the visitor centers have accessibility information about the Everglades. The Ernest F. Coe Visitor Center, located at the park entrance near Homestead, is easily accessible to wheelchairs. The Royal Palm Visitor Center is accessible to wheelchairs. This area allows for ideal wildlife viewing along the Anhinga Trail, which is also wheelchair friendly. The Flamingo Visitor Center is accessible by a steep ramp. The Shark Valley Visitor Center is accessible to wheelchairs. The Gulf Coast Visitor Center is accessible by elevator from the parking area.

Gulf Islands National Seashore, Gulf Breeze, Florida, and Mississippi https://www.nps.gov/guis/index.htm (850) 934-2600 https://www.facebook.com/GulfIslandsNPS

Poet John Masefield wrote, “I must go down to the seas again, for the call of the running tide is a wild call and a clear call that may not be denied.” Millions of visitors are drawn to the islands in the northern Gulf of Mexico for the white sandy beaches, the aquamarine waters, a boat ride, a camping spot, a tour of an old fort, or a place to fish. Park Headquarters at Naval Live Oaks offers exhibits with a wide range of accessibility features, including telephone handsets for audio description, a tactile model of an oak tree, a railing system that connects all the exhibits together, and tactile models of natural history objects including acorns, oak leaves, and a large gopher tortoise. The first loop of the Brackenridge Trail is now an accessible boardwalk with tactile waysides. The Fort Barrancas Visitor Center has accessible museum exhibits including a small scale replica of Fort Barrancas and the Water Battery. Exhibits and the film of Fort Barrancas are audio described. The Fort Pickens Museum has interactive and universally-designed exhibits featuring the natural and cultural stories of Gulf Islands National Seashore. Access is limited to historic structures including: Fort Pickens, Fort Barrancas, and the Advanced Redoubt. The Fort Pickens fishing pier is accessible. The Perdido Key Discovery Trail and six beach cross-over boardwalks (two to sound; four to Gulf) are wheelchair accessible. Beach wheelchairs are available at Johnson Beach at the Perdido key, Santa Rosa Day Use (Opal Beach), and Fort Pickens Areas.

GEORGIA

The city of Savannah is famed for its 18th- and 19th-century architecture and leafy public squares. Augusta hosts the Masters golf tournament. Widespread farms produce peanuts, corn, and soybeans across middle and south Georgia. The state is the number one producer of pecans in the world. Gainesville in northeast Georgia touts itself as the Poultry Capital of the World. Georgia is in the top five blueberry producers in the United States. For the past four years, Georgia has been ranked the top state in the nation to do business (from a 2016 poll). For years, Georgia as a state has had the highest credit rating by Standard and Poor’s (AAA) and is one of only 15 states with a AAA rating. If Georgia were a stand-alone country, it would be the 28th largest economy in the world. Hartsfield Jackson Atlanta International Airport, the world’s busiest airport as measured by both passenger traffic and aircraft traffic, is located in Georgia. Atlanta is a global city, also called world city or sometimes alpha city or world center, as a city generally considered to be an important node in the global economic system. The Georgia Aquarium, in Atlanta, was the largest aquarium in the world in 2010 according to Guinness World Records.

Georgia has 11 National Parks, 3 National Heritage Areas, 2 National Trails managed by the NPS, 49 National Historic Landmarks and 11 National Natural Landmarks, namely national historic sites (Jimmy Carter and Martin Luther King, Jr.), historic trails (Appalachian and Trail of Tears), and a national military park.

Georgia Aquarium georgiaaquarium.org 404.581.4000 Email:[email protected]  
Zoo Atlanta zooatlanta.org 404.624.9453 Email:[email protected]  
Appalachian National Scenic Trail (CT, GA, MA, MD, ME, NC, NH, NJ, NY, PA, TN VA, VT, WV) https://www.nps.gov/appa/index.htm (304) 535-6278 (Harpers Ferry, WV) No Facebook connection found on home page.

Conceived in 1921, built by private citizens, and completed in 1937, today the Appalachian Trail is managed by the National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, numerous state agencies and thousands of volunteers. The Appalachian Trail is a 2,180+ mile long public footpath that traverses the scenic, wooded, pastoral, wild, and culturally resonant lands of the Appalachian Mountains from Georgia to Maine. The Appalachian National Scenic Trail does not currently have a visitor center. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy, a national not-for-profit corporation has a visitor center in Harpers Ferry, WV. The Appalachian Trail has been enjoyed by visitors with a variety of disabilities - including the blind, hearing-impaired, and hikers with a range of mobility limitations. The trail is not highly developed though, and there are only a few sections that are considered fully accessible.

Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park, Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia https://www.nps.gov/chch/index.htm (706) 866-9241 https://www.facebook.com/chchnps

In 1863, Union and Confederate forces fought for control of Chattanooga, known as the “Gateway to the Deep South.” The Confederates were victorious at nearby Chickamauga in September. However, renewed fighting in Chattanooga that November provided Union troops victory and control of the city. After the fighting, a Confederate soldier ominously wrote, “This...is the death-knell of the Confederacy.” The Visitor Center is accessible by wheelchair and has lots to do and see. They can also provide specifics about certain areas of the park that could be accessed by wheelchair. Basically, this is a very large park, and it is suggested that viewing is best from a vehicle if a wheelchair is required for mobility.

Fort Sumter National Historical Site, Andersonville, Georgia https://www.nps.gov/ande/index.htm (229) 924-0343 https://www.facebook.com/AndersonvilleNPS

The Camp Sumter military prison at Andersonville was one of the largest Confederate military prisons during the Civil War. During the 14 months the prison existed, more than 45,000 Union soldiers were confined here. Of these, almost 13,000 died here. Today, Andersonville National Historic Site is a memorial to all American prisoners of war throughout the nation’s history. The park has three main features, the National Prisoner of War Museum, the historic prison site, and the Andersonville National Cemetery. The National Prisoner of War Museum is fully handicap accessible. However, due to the uneven terrain the prison site and National Cemetery are more difficult to maneuver. The prison site can be toured on foot or by car. A one hour audio driving tour of both the prison site and the National Cemetery is available as a free service to visitors. The tour is available as a CD or audio cassette, and may be checked out at the museum information desk from 9:00 a.m. - 3:15 p.m. daily.

National Historic Trail – Trail of Tears (AL, AR, GA, IL, KY, MO, NC, OK, TN) https://www.nps.gov/trte/index.htm (505) 988-6098 No Facebook listing was found.

Remember and commemorate the survival of the Cherokee people, forcefully removed from their homelands in Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee to live in Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail passes through the present-day states of Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Tennessee. A complete summary is set forth under the state of Alabama, one of the origins of the Trail.

Ocmulgee National Monument, Macon, Georgia https://www.nps.gov/ocmu/index.htm (478) 752-8257, ext. 222 Our phones will only be answered during business hours 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 7 days a week. https://www.facebook.com/ocmulgeenps/

Welcome to Ocmulgee National Monument. This park is a prehistoric American Indian site. American Indians first came here during the Paleo-Indian period hunting Ice Age mammals. Many different American Indian cultures occupied this land for thousands of years. Around 900CE, the Mississippian Period began. They constructed mounds for their elite, which remain today. The Earth Lodge floor is original and was carbon dated to the year 1015. The park Visitor Center is wheelchair accessible. The park’s earth lodge has a long low clearance and narrow entrance and is not accessible to most wheelchairs. The most visited mounds in the park you can access by automobile; however, to get to the top you must climb 80 steps to reach to the top.

HAWAII

Based on archaeological evidence, the earliest habitation of the Hawaiian Islands dates to around 300 CE, probably by Polynesian settlers from the Marquesas Islands. Hawaii, the 50th state, is an isolated volcanic archipelago in the Central Pacific. Its islands are renowned for their rugged landscapes of cliffs, waterfalls, tropical foliage and beaches with gold, red, black and even green sands. The 1778 arrival of British explorer James Cook was the first documented contact by a European explorer with Hawaii. Cook named the archipelago as the Sandwich Islands in honor of his sponsor John Montaga, 4th Earl of Sandwich. Cook published the islands’ location and rendered the native name as Owyhee. This spelling lives on in Owyhee County, Idaho. It was named after three native Hawaiian members of a trapping party who went missing in that area. The Owyhee Mountains were also named for them. There are eight main Hawaiian Islands, seven of which are permanently inhabited. Of the main islands, Oahu has Hawaii’s biggest city and capital, Honolulu, home to crescent Waikiki Beach and Pearl Harbor’s WWII memorials. In addition to the eight main islands, the state has many smaller islands and islets. It is the only state with an Asian plurality. The state’s coastline is about 750 miles long, the fourth longest in the U.S. after the coastlines of Alaska, Florida, and California. It is the only U.S. state that is not geographically located in North America, the only state completely surrounded by water and that is entirely an archipelago, and the only state in which coffee is cultivable.

Hawaii is home to 8 National Parks that celebrate and preserve Hawaii’s unique beauty and native culture, 1 National Trail managed by the NPS, 33 National Historic Landmarks, 7 National Natural Landmarks, and 2 World Heritage Sites. (Note: Tickets to all parks are limited and sometimes booked months in advance.)

Honolulu Zoo honoluluzoo.org 808.971.7171 Email:[email protected]  
Waikiki Aquarium waikikiaquarium.org 808.923.9741 Email:[email protected]  
Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hilo, Hawaii https://www.nps.gov/havo/index.htm (808) 985-6000 https://www.facebook.com/hawaiivolcanoesnps

Located 30 miles southwest of Hilo, on Hawaii’s big island, this is the home of Kilauea Volcano, one of the most active volcanoes on earth. This is the most popular visitor attraction in Hawaii and a sacred place for Native Hawaiians. The Kīlauea Visitor Center, Jaggar Museum, Volcano House, and Volcano Art Center are wheelchair accessible. Pullouts along Crater Rim Drive and Chain of Craters Road afford panoramic views of the park. Accessible pathways include Waldron Ledge (Earthquake Trail), Devastation Trail, Pauahi Crater, Muliwai a Pele, and Kealakomo Overlook. Nāmakanipaio campground has restrooms with water and moderately accessible campsites. Kulanaokuaiki campground has 2 accessible campsites, an accessible toilet, but no water. Kīlauea Visitor Center, Volcano House, Kīlauea Overlook, Jaggar Museum, Thurston Lava Tube, Nāmakanipaio campground, Kīpukapuaulu picnic area, Mauna Ulu, Kulanaokuaiki campground and the turnaround at the end of Chain of Craters Road all have restrooms or wheelchair accessible toilets.

Pearl Harbor National Historic Monument, Oahu, Hawaii http://www.pearlharborhistoricsites.org/pearl-harbor/ (808) 453-0686 (Pearl Harbor Historic Sites Ticket Counter) Address connection not found on website.

Pearl Harbor National Historical Landmark on Oahu is the only naval base in the United States to be designated a National Historical Landmark. Parking and admission to the Pearl Harbor Visitor Center is free. Pearl Harbor honors its history with four museums: the U.S.S. Arizona Memorial, the Battleship Missouri Memorial, The U.S.S. Bowfin Submarine Museum, and the Pacific Aviation Museum. Tickets for USS Missouri and Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor may be purchased in advance online. Admission to Arizona Memorial is free. Battleship Missouri Memorial and Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor are both located on Ford Island and are only accessible to the general public via the shuttle buses which depart from the Visitor Center every 15 minutes. The last shuttle back to the Visitor Center leaves at 5:00 p.m. from Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor. The four Museums are wheelchair accessible. One of two submarine tours is wheelchair accessible.

Puukohula Heiau (Temple) National Historical Site, Kawaihae, Hawaii www.nps.gov/puhe/index.htm (808) 882-7218, ext. 0 www.nps.gov/puhe/index.htm

Our Visitor Center is ADA compliant and offers wall exhibits with both English and Hawaiian language interpretive information. We also offer self-selecting videos with a 500-person capacity. Free Audio tour available for Smart Phones (Data/Service Provider fees may apply). Restrooms and drinking fountains are located outside of Visitor Center. Museum exhibits and Park Store are located inside the Visitor Center. The park Visitor Center and restrooms are accessible.

IDAHO

Idaho is a northwestern U.S. state known for its mountainous landscapes and vast swaths of protected wilderness and outdoor recreation areas. The region was explored by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark in 1805–1806. It was then a part of the Oregon country, held jointly by the United States and Great Britain. Boundary disputes with Great Britain were settled by the Oregon Treaty in 1846, and the first permanent U.S. settlement in Idaho was established by the Mormons at Franklin in 1860. The capital, Boise, is set in the Rocky Mountain foothills and bisected by the Boise River, which is popular for rafting and fishing. The city’s riverfront Julia Davis Park is a downtown green space containing a rose garden, museums and a zoo. Idaho has 7 National Parks, 3 National Trails managed by the NPS, 10 National Historic Landmarks, 11 National Natural Landmarks, and 1 World Heritage Site.

Zoo Boise zooboise.org 208.608.7760 Email:[email protected]  
Yellowstone Bear World yellowstonebearworld.com 208.359.9688 Email:[email protected]  
Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument, Hagerman, Idaho https://www.nps.gov/hafo/index.htm (208) 933-4105 https://www.facebook.com/HagermanFossilBedsNPS

Did you know horses evolved in North America? The Hagerman Horse, Equus simplicidens, was the first true horse (but its bones resemble Grevy’s zebra bones). It’s the park’s most famous fossil, but we have over two hundred different species. From saber-toothed cat, mastodon, bear, camel, and ground sloth to much smaller animals, the scientific study of Pliocene fossils is the key to Hagerman. Hagerman horse fossil skeletons were excavated in the early 1930s by the Smithsonian Institution. These skeletons were traded worldwide. Reserved parking spaces are available with accessible walkways to the visitor center. The facility has accessible restrooms.

Yellowstone National Park (ID, MT, WY), Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming https://www.nps.gov/yell/index.htm (307) 344-7381 https://www.facebook.com/YellowstoneNPS

Visit Yellowstone and experience the world’s first national park. Marvel at a volcano’s hidden power rising up in colorful hot springs, mudpots, and geysers. Explore mountains, forests, and lakes to watch wildlife and witness the drama of the natural world unfold. Discover the history that led to the conservation of our national treasures “for the benefit and enjoyment of the people.” Many of the facilities at Yellowstone National Park are more than a century old and built before the adoption of current accessibility standards; accessibility is not always ideal. The National Park Service strives to make the park as universally accessible as possible. Extra obstacles will be encountered because of the remote, wilderness nature of this special place. Facilities described as accessible do not necessarily comply fully with federal standards, and some accessible facilities are not marked with the international symbol. The NPS Yellowstone National Park app includes audio-described sites and alternative text for images, combined with your device’s built-in accessibility features. This app includes up-to-date accessibility information for facilities and some trails in the park. Download it before you arrive.

Nez Perce National Historical Park (ID, MT, OR, WA), Lapwai, Idaho https://www.nps.gov/nepe/index.htm (208) 843-7009 https://www.facebook.com/DiscoverNezPerceNationalHistoricalPark

This park was established in 1965 to tell the story of the Nez Perce (Nimiipuu) people. Spread out over four states (Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington), following the route of the 1877 conflict, this park offers something for everyone. The history and culture of the Nez Perce surrounds the park. Discover how the Nimiipuu adapted and today thrive continuing to preserve their culture. Nez Perce National Historical Park has thirty-eight sites. F or 11,000 years the NiimiiPuu have been here. Their story is the story of the American Indian in all its glory and sadness. Park Rangers staff Visitor Centers in Spalding, Idaho and Wisdom, Montana. Other sites have staff, wayside exhibits or trail guides. There are dozens of interesting sites throughout this park and accessibility varies, so we suggest that you review the Visitors Guide found under the “Plan Your Visit” section on the website to determine which sites would be most appropriate for your family to visit. The Visitor Centers at Spalding and Big Hole battlefield have accessible restroom facilities and exhibits. Trails at Canoe Camp outside of Orofino, Idaho, and the Heart of Monster in Kamiah, Idaho, have accessible trails.

Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail (ID,IL,IA,KS,MO,MT,NE,ND,OR,SD,WA) https://www.nps.gov/lecl/index.htm (402) 661-1804 (Omaha, Nebraska) https://www.facebook.com/lewisandclarknht

Between May 1804 and September 1806, 31 men, one woman, and a baby traveled from the plains of the Midwest to the shores of the Pacific Ocean and back. They called themselves the Corps of Discovery. In their search for a water route to the Pacific Ocean, they opened a window into the west for the young United States. Over two hundred years later, visitors can retrace the Expedition’s path by following the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Among the more than 100 sites along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail, only five are National Park Service sites. To learn more about sites along the Trail, visit the Basic Information page under the Plan Your Visit section on the website. The Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail Headquarters Visitor Center is a handicapped accessible site. Bathrooms and most displays are accessible to those who are mobility impaired. The interpretive film is also accessible, has open caption and full audio.

Blank Park Zoo blankparkzoo.com 515.285.4722 Email:[email protected]  
National Mississippi River Museum and Aquarium rivermuseum.com 800.226.3369 Email:[email protected]  
ILLINOIS

Three U.S. presidents have been elected while living in Illinois: Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, and Barack Obama. Ronald Reagan, whose political career was based in California, was the only U.S. president born and raised in Illinois. Today, Illinois honors Lincoln with its official state slogan, Land of Lincoln, which has been displayed on its license plates since 1954. The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum is located in the state capital of Springfield, and the Barack Obama Presidential Center will be completed in Chicago by 2020. In 1960, Ray Kroc opened the first McDonald’s franchise in Des Plaines (which still exists as a museum, with a working McDonald’s across the street). With eleven plants currently operating, Illinois leads all states in the amount of electricity generated from nuclear power. The historic trails pertain to the Lewis & Clark expedition that traveled through eleven states (ID,IL,IA,KS,MO,MT,NE,ND, OR, SD,WA); the Mormon Pioneer Trail across five states (IL, IA, NE, UT, WY); and Trail of Tears in which the Cherokee crossed nine states (AL, AR, GH, IL, KY, MO, NC, OK, TN). Illinois has 2 National Parks, 2 National Heritage Areas, 1 Wild & Scenic River managed by the NPS, 1 National Trail managed by the NPS, 88 National Historic Landmarks, 18 National Natural Landmarks, and 1 World Heritage Site.

Lincoln Home National Historic Site, Springfield, Illinois https://www.nps.gov/liho/index.htm (217) 492-4241 https://www.facebook.com/LincolnHomeNHS

Abraham Lincoln believed in the ideal that everyone in America should have the opportunity to improve his/her economic and social condition. Lincoln’s life was the embodiment of that idea. We know him as the sixteenth president, but he was also a spouse, parent, and neighbor who experienced the same hopes, dreams, and challenges of life that are still experienced by many people. Lincoln Home National Historic Site is dedicated to providing opportunities for visitors with disabilities by offering a wide range of media and programs that are accessible. Accessible features of Lincoln Home include: lift access to the first floor of the Lincoln Home, Arnold and Dean Houses; availability of wheelchairs for use on-site; open captioned and audio described park films; assisted listening devices; foreign language subtitled house tour videos; tactile exhibits; and a process to request a sign language interpreter. Unfortunately, the Lincoln Home is not accessible to motorized wheelchairs. The Lincoln Home is FIRST FLOOR accessible only. When acquiring a ticket for a tour, please inform the ranger issuing the tickets of the need for an accessible tour. A ranger will be available to assist visitors requiring the accessible entrance to the Lincoln Home. The Accessibility Guide available on the website under the Plan Your Visit icon contains specific information for the property.

Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail (IA, IL, NE, UT, WY) https://www.nps.gov/mopi/index.htm (801) 741-1012 (Utah) Not available

Explore the Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail across five states to see the route 70,000 Mormons traveled from 1846 to 1869 to escape religious persecution. The Pioneer Company of 1846-1847 established the first route from Nauvoo, Illinois, to Salt Lake City, Utah, covering about 1,300 miles. We recommend contacting the nearest visitors and convention bureau to where you plan to visit for each day you are traveling along the trail or contact the individual sites or parks directly. Some sites may provide accessible trails or pathways for touring an area. National Park Service Auto Tour Route guides provide detailed information to help you plan your visit. The Trip Itineraries page on the website offers state or regional trips - come back to this page often as we amass more trip itineraries for you. Use these resources to plan your visit to the Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail. Go to Places to Go for an interactive map with trail sites and a list of sites by state (https://www.nps.gov/mopi/planyourvisit/index.htm).

National Historic Trail – Trail of Tears (AL, AR, GA, IL, KY, MO, NC, OK, TN) https://www.nps.gov/trte/index.htm (505) 988-6098 No Facebook listing was found.

Remember and commemorate the survival of the Cherokee people, forcefully removed from their homelands in Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee to live in Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail passes through the present-day states of Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Tennessee. A complete summary is set forth under the state of Alabama, one of the origins of the Trail.

INDIANA

Indiana’s 41-mile Lake Michigan waterfront—one of the world’s great industrial centers—turns out iron, steel, and oil products. Indiana is also a leader in agriculture, and much of the building limestone used in the U.S. is quarried in Indiana, which is also a large producer of coal. Wyandotte Cave, one of the largest in the U.S., is located in Crawford County in southern Indiana, and West Baden and French Lick are well known for their mineral springs. Other attractions include Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial, and the George Rogers Clark National Historical Park. Indiana has 2 National Parks, 2 National Heritage Areas, 1 Wild & Scenic River managed by the NPS, 1 National Trail managed by the NPS, 88 National Historic Landmarks, 18 National Natural Landmarks, and 1 World Heritage Site.

Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo kidszoo.org 260.427.6800 [email protected]  
Indianapolis Zoo/ Aquarium Windianapoliszoo.com 317.630.2001 Email:[email protected]  
Washington Park Zoo washingtonparkzoo.com 219.873.1510 Email:[email protected]  
Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, Porter, Indiana https://www.nps.gov/indu/index.htm (219) 395-1882 https://www.facebook.com/IndianaDunesNL

Beyond the sandy beaches, explore rugged dunes, quiet forests and tranquil wetlands along 50 miles of hiking trails. World-class birding and over 1,100 native plant species makes this 15,000 acre park among the most biologically rich in the nation. There are several major sites within the park that are accessible to wheelchairs, one of which is the Portage Lakefront and Riverwalk Trail System (paved hiking trail, pavilion, fishing pier). Accessible parking and restroom services are available throughout the park. Access to the waters of Lake Michigan poses challenging accessibility problems. The following beach areas have limited accessibility: West Beach (a beach wheel chair can be checked out from the lifeguards), and Lake View (the picnic shelters and overlook are accessible). https://www.nps.gov/indu/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm

George Rogers Clark National Historical Park, Vincennes, Indiana https://www.nps.gov/gero/index.htm (812) 882-1776, ext. 1210 https://www.facebook.com/GeorgeRogersClarkNationalHistoricalPark

The British flag would not be raised above Fort Sackville February 25, 1779. At 10 a.m., the garrison surrendered to American Colonel George Rogers Clark. His American army, aided by French residents of the Illinois country, had marched through freezing floodwaters to gain this victory. The fort’s capture assured United States claims to the frontier, an area nearly as large as the original 13 states. A memorial such as this serves as a reminder that courage, fortitude, and valor do not go out of style. “The truly great heroes of history age well and provide guidance for the future.” The George Rogers Clark Memorial (spoiler alert) is not accessible by wheelchair; there are 33 steps up to the entrance according to a park staff person. However, the Visitor Center does have wheelchair access, as do the grounds around the Memorial. (Note: This editor suggested that it would behoove the National Park Service to build a ramp for wheelchair access to the Memorial itself.)

Lincoln Boyhood Memorial, Lincoln City, Indiana https://www.nps.gov/libo/index.htm (812) 937-4541 https://www.facebook.com/LincolnBoyhoodNPS

Abraham Lincoln grew from youth to manhood on this southern Indiana soil. Many character and moral traits of one of the world’s most respected leaders were formed and nurtured here. The Memorial Visitor Center and Living Historical Farm is wheelchair accessible. The hiking trails consist of rock, and have moderate inclines in places. There are hard-surfaced sidewalk paths from the Visitor Center parking lot and the Memorial Building. Get ready for a re-created 1820s homestead and memorials, hiking trails, and historic walks. Lincoln Boyhood offers countless opportunities for discovery and we hope you will have fun, make lifelong memories, and develop a deep connection to this special place. See the following link for further information (https://www.nps.gov/libo/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm).

IOWA

Iowa is bordered by the Mississippi River on the east; the Missouri River and the Big Sioux River on the west. Iowa is the only state whose east and west borders are formed entirely by rivers. The Clint Eastwood movie The Bridges of Madison County, based on the popular novel of the same name, took place and was filmed in Madison County. Also in Madison County is the John Wayne Birthplace Museum in Winterset. Because of the extraordinary history in the teaching and sponsoring of creative writing that emanated from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and related programs, Iowa City was the first American city designated by the United Nations as a “City of Literature” in the UNESCO Creative Cities Network. The Amana Colonies are a group of settlements of German Pietists comprising seven villages listed as National Historic Landmarks. CNBC’s list of “Top States for Business in 2010” has recognized Iowa as the sixth best state in the nation. Scored in 10 individual categories, Iowa was ranked 1st when it came to the “Cost of Doing Business”; this includes all taxes, utility costs, and other costs associated with doing business. Most of Iowa is used for agriculture; crops cover 60% of the state, grasslands (mostly pasture and hay with some prairie and wetland) cover 30%, and forests cover 7%; urban areas and water cover another 1% each. Iowa is the nation’s largest producer of ethanol and corn and some years is the largest grower of soybeans as well. Iowa has 2 National Parks, 1 National Heritage Area, 2 National Trails managed by the NPS, 25 National Historic Landmarks, and 7 National Natural Landmarks.

Effigy Mounds, Harpers Ferry, Iowa https://www.nps.gov/efmo/index.htm (563) 873-3491, ext. 123 https://www.facebook.com/Effigy-Mounds-National-Monument-148276811865993/

The mounds preserved here are considered sacred by many Americans, especially the Monument’s 20 culturally associated American Indian tribes. A visit offers opportunities to contemplate the meanings of the mounds and the people who built them. The 200 plus American Indian mounds are located in one of the most picturesque sections of the Upper Mississippi River Valley. The Visitor Center, museum, book sales outlet and auditorium are accessible to wheelchairs. In addition, a one-mile round trip boardwalk trail is wheelchair accessible. Although most Indian mound groups involve hiking along relatively long and steep trails, three burial mounds are accessible directly behind the Visitor Center.

Herbert Hoover National Historic Site, West Branch, Iowa https://www.nps.gov/heho/index.htm (319) 643-2541 https://www.facebook.com/HerbertHooverNHS/

Born in a two-room cottage, Herbert Hoover could have been any small town boy. Orphaned at age nine, he left West Branch, never to live here again. The landscape and buildings of the early years remain, however, to tell how family, faith, education, and hard work opened a world of opportunity— even the presidency of the United States— to a child of simple beginnings. The historic nature of the site may make visiting difficult for people with disabilities. Most of the ground around the historic buildings is level. The wooden boardwalks may be slippery when wet, so please watch your step. If you plan to tour the historic buildings, it is advised to bring someone to assist you (https://www.nps.gov/heho/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm).

KANSAS

Kansas is named after the Kansa Native American tribe, which inhabited the area. The tribe’s name (natively kką:ze) is often said to mean “people of the wind” or “people of the south wind”, although this was probably not the term’s original meaning. On January 29, 1861, Kansas entered the Union as a free state (anti-slavery). Following the Civil War, the Chisholm Trail was opened and the Wild West-era commenced in Kansas. Wild Bill Hickok was a deputy marshal at Fort Riley and a marshal at Hays and Abilene. Dodge City was another wild cowboy town, and both Bat Masterson and Wyatt Earp worked as lawmen in the town. In one year alone, eight million head of cattle from Texas boarded trains in Dodge City bound for the East, earning Dodge the nickname “Queen of the Cowtowns.” Kansas’s capital Topeka is sometimes cited as the home of Pentecostalism as it was the site of Charles Fox Parham’s Bethel Bible College, where glossolalia was first claimed as the evidence of a spiritual experience referred to as the baptism of the Holy Spirit in 1901. It is also the home of Reverend Charles Sheldon, author of In His Steps, and was the site where the question “What Would Jesus Do?” originated in a sermon of Sheldon’s at Central Congregational Church. The city of Manhattan is home to Kansas State University, the second largest public university in the state and the nation’s oldest land-grant university, dating back to 1863. South of the campus, Aggieville dates back to 1889 and is the state’s oldest shopping district of its kind. Kansas also has the third largest state highway system in the country after Texas and California. This is because of the high number of counties and county seats (105) and the intertwining of them all. By 2015, Kansas was one of the most productive agricultural states, producing high yields of wheat, corn, sorghum, and soybeans. There are 5 National Parks, 1 National Heritage Area, 4 National Trails managed by the NPS, 25 National Historic Landmarks and 5 National Natural Landmarks.

Tanganyika Wildlife Park twpark.com 316.794.8954 [email protected]  
Kansas City Zoo kansascityzoo.org 816.595.1234 [email protected]  
Rolling Hills Wildlife Adventure rollinghillswildlife.com 785-827-9488 Email:[email protected]  
Brown v Board of Education National Historic Site, Topeka, Kansas https://www.nps.gov/brvb/learn/historyculture/kansas.htm (785) 354-4273 https://www.facebook.com/brownvboardnps/

The story of Brown v. Board of Education, which ended legal segregation in public schools, is one of hope and courage. When the people agreed to be plaintiffs in the case, they never knew they would change history. The people who make up this story were ordinary people. They were teachers, secretaries, welders, ministers and students who simply wanted to be treated equally. The U.S. Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education (1954) is one of the most pivotal opinions ever rendered by that body. Reserved accessible parking is available in the rear parking lot; there are four designated spaces. There are curb cut-outs and ADA-compliant ramps to the main entrance of the site. Restrooms are accessible, and there is an elevator available to the second floor. Four accessible picnic tables are available. The nearby section of the Landon Trail is paved and wheelchair-accessible.

California National Historic Trail (CA, CO, ID, KS, MO, NE, NV, OR, UT, WY) https://www.nps.gov/cali/index.htm (801) 741-1012 https://www.facebook.com/oregoncalifornianps

Between 1841 and 1869, more than a quarter million people answered this call and crossed the plains and mountains to the West. These emigrants started their journeys in Kansas and Missouri, walking more than 2,000 miles for months in pursuit of a better life. The California and Oregon Trails follow the same route until Idaho, where they diverge, the Oregon Trail turning north to Oregon and the California Trail heading to California. A complete summary is set forth under the state of California, the final destination of the trail.

Pony Express National Historic Trail (CA, CO, KS, MO, NE, NV, UT, WY) https://www.nps.gov/poex/index.htm (801) 741-1012 (NM; office of National Trails Intermountain Region) https://www.facebook.com/PonyExpressNPS

It is hard to believe that young men once rode horses to carry mail from Missouri to California in the unprecedented time of only 10 days. This relay system along the Pony Express National Historic Trail in eight states was the most direct and practical means of east-west communications before the telegraph. A complete summary of this trail is included under the state of Missouri, the origin of the trail.

Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail (ID,IL,IA,KS,MO,MT,NE,ND,OR,SD,WA) https://www.nps.gov/lecl/index.htm (402) 661-1804 (Omaha, Nebraska) https://www.facebook.com/lewisandclarknht

Between May 1804 and September 1806, 31 men, one woman, and a baby traveled from the plains of the Midwest to the shores of the Pacific Ocean and back. They called themselves the Corps of Discovery. In their search for a water route to the Pacific Ocean, they opened a window into the west for the young United States. Over two hundred years later, visitors can retrace the Expedition’s path by following the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Among the more than 100 sites along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail, only five are National Park Service sites. To learn more about sites along the Trail, visit the Basic Information page under the Plan Your Visit section on the website. The Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail Headquarters Visitor Center is a handicapped accessible site. Bathrooms and most displays are accessible to those who are mobility impaired. The interpretive film is also accessible, has open caption and full audio

KENTUCKY

Kentucky is one of four U.S. states constituted as a commonwealth (the others being Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts). The term has no particular significance in its meaning and was chosen to emphasize the distinction from the status of royal colonies as a place governed for the general welfare of the populace. Both Confederate President Jefferson Davis and U.S. President Abraham Lincoln were born in Kentucky. Kentucky is known as the “Bluegrass State,” a nickname based on the bluegrass found in many of its pastures due to the fertile soil. Kentucky was the site of the first commercial winery in the United States (started in present-day Jessamine County in 1799) and, due to the high calcium content of the soil in the Bluegrass region, quickly became a major horse breeding (and later racing) area. Kentucky produces 95% of the world’s supply of bourbon whiskey. Fort Knox, a United States Army post best known as the site of the U.S. Bullion Depository, which is used to house a large portion of the United States official gold reserves, is located in Kentucky. Old Louisville, the largest historic preservation district in the United States featuring Victorian architecture and the third largest overall, hosts the St. James Court Art Show, the largest outdoor art show in the United States. The Renfro Valley Gatherin’ is today America’s second oldest continually broadcast radio program of any kind. It is broadcast on local radio station WRVK and a syndicated network of nearly 200 other stations across the United States and Canada every week. Kentucky is a land with diverse environments and abundant resources, including the world’s longest cave system, Mammoth Cave National Park, the greatest length of navigable waterways and streams in the contiguous United States, and the two largest man-made lakes east of the Mississippi River. Kentucky is also known for horse racing, bourbon distilleries, coal, the historic site My Old Kentucky Home, automobile manufacturing, tobacco, bluegrass music, college basketball, and Kentucky Fried Chicken. Kentucky has 3 National Parks (Abraham Lincoln Birthplace, Cumberland Gap, and Mammoth Cave), 1 National Historical Trail (Trail of Tears) managed by the NPS, 1 National Battlefield (Fort Donelson), and 1 National River and Recreation Area (Big South Fork).

Kentucky Down Under Adventure Zoo kentuckydownunder.com 270.786.1010 Email:[email protected]  
Louisville Zoo louisvillezoo.org 502.459.2181 Email:[email protected]  
KY/OHNewport - Cincinnati newportaquarium.com 800.406.3474 Email:[email protected]  
Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historical Park, Hodgenville, Kentucky https://www.nps.gov/abli/index.htm (270) 358-3137 https://www.facebook.com/LincolnBirthplaceNPS/

For over a century, people from around the world have come to rural Central Kentucky to honor the humble beginnings of our 16th president, Abraham Lincoln. His early life on Kentucky’s frontier shaped his character and prepared him to lead the nation through Civil War. The country’s first memorial to Lincoln, built with donations from young and old, enshrines the symbolic birthplace cabin. The symbolic birth cabin is enshrined within a Neo-Classical Memorial Building on the traditional site of the birthplace of Abraham Lincoln. The Visitor Center and the Memorial Building are accessible by wheelchair. Access to the Memorial Building is via a wooden boardwalk suitable for wheelchairs. Boardwalk and walkway lead to back door of Memorial Building that operates on a push button door opener. The Sinking Spring is accessible via cement sidewalk approximately 200 feet in length and 5% grade, sidewalk starts at southwest corner of parking lot. Short, level sidewalk runs parallel to Sinking Spring allowing visitors to look over into spring without descending and ascending steps into spring sinkhole. The Boundary Oak Tree Site is accessible via cement sidewalk approximately 200 feet in length and 5% grade, sidewalk starts at southwest corner of parking lot. Restrooms are accessible. Four accessible parking spaces. Front door of Visitor Center operates on a push button door opener. Two accessible cement picnic pads furnished with table and grill. Picnic pavilion has two accessible tables. Two accessible parking spaces. Restrooms are accessible via cement sidewalk.

Cumberland Gap National Historical Park, Middlesboro, Kentucky https://www.nps.gov/cuga/index.htm &(606) 248-2817 https://www.facebook.com/CumberlandGapNHP/

The story of early pioneers; settlers and soldiers; pristine mountain streams; sights and sounds of wildlife; pastoral landscapes- all can be found while exploring Cumberland Gap National Historical Park. The park consists of approximately 24,000 acres, 85 miles of trails, camping, and lots to do and see! Start your park adventure at the Visitor Center. The park’s Visitor Center complex includes a museum, auditorium, sales areas and restrooms. All are accessible, allowing for wheelchair use. Designated parking allows easy access to the building. Chat with a ranger, visit the hands-on museum, pick up a park map, or purchase a book. Leaving the Visitor Center, park visitors can drive a winding four-mile-long road up to the Pinnacle Overlook (elevation 2,440 feet) for a spectacular view into Kentucky, Virginia, and Tennessee. A level 1/4-mile paved trail provides access to this overlook, from which visitors have a spectacular view into Kentucky, Tennessee, and Virginia. Accessible restrooms are located near the overlook. When park staff is available, shuttles to the Pinnacle Overlook can be arranged; cost is $5.00 per person. Accessible drive-in campsites are available at the park’s Wilderness Road Campground. Surfaces within these sites have been hardened, the height of fire grates has been increased, and picnic tables have been modified. Restrooms and showers are accessible and are family friendly for visitors with small children. A short, paved trail leads to the campground’s amphitheater, where park rangers present programs on the cultural and natural history of the park. Almost 85 miles of hiking trails meander through eastern deciduous forest in this 24,000 acre national park. Distances range from a 1/4mile loop trail to the 21-mile-long Ridge Trail.

National Historic Trail – Trail of Tears (AL, AR, GA, IL, KY, MO, NC, OK, TN) https://www.nps.gov/trte/index.htm (505) 988-6098 No Facebook listing was found.

Remember and commemorate the survival of the Cherokee people, forcefully removed from their homelands in Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee to live in Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail passes through the present-day states of Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Tennessee. A complete summary is set forth under the state of Alabama, one of the origins of the Trail.

Mammoth Cave National Park, Mammoth Cave, Kentucky https://www.nps.gov/maca/planyourvisit/gocavetours.htm (NOTE: We were unable to find a web URL that took us directly to the home page for Mammoth Cave. However, after the above URL has been accessed, the reader can click on “home page.”) (270) 758-2180 https://www.facebook.com/MammothCaveNPS

Mammoth Cave National Park preserves the cave system and a part of the Green River valley and hilly country of south central Kentucky. Mammoth Cave National Park is a place for all people, with activities for every level of ability. The Park is committed to providing accessibility and inclusion for persons with special needs while preserving and protecting the resources. This is the world’s longest known cave system, with more than 400 miles explored. Early guide Stephen Bishop called the cave a “grand, gloomy and peculiar place,” but its vast chambers and complex labyrinths have earned its name - Mammoth. African Americans played a vital role in the development of cave tour routes and the visitor experience throughout the 19th and early 20th century. The first black guides were slaves and through their efforts opened up the golden age of cave exploration for Mammoth Cave. Their discoveries and story continues to live on within the avenues and guided tours of the cave today. While each slave guide eventually saw their freedom, their life was fraught with hardship in a time where the country was divided on their place in society. During their lifetimes, they may have never realized the importance of their existence. However, today they are not viewed as slaves or lower class citizens. They are legends. The park offers camping in three developed campgrounds and in more than a dozen primitive sites in the backcountry and along the Green and Nolin Rivers. The visitor center has handicap restrooms. The Mammoth Cave Accessible Tour is available to individuals in wheelchairs. There are several surface trails that are accessible by wheelchairs. Using the elevator entrance, this ½-mile round trip provides visitors with special needs an opportunity to visit the Snowball Room and includes portions of the Cleaveland Avenue Tour and Grand Avenue Tour. Accessible restrooms are available in the Snowball Room. The Frozen Niagara Tour is not accessible to individuals in wheelchairs. In the evening, join a park ranger for a special program at the wheelchair accessible Park Amphitheater.

LOUISIANA

Louisiana is the only state in the U.S. with political subdivisions termed parishes, which are the local government’s equivalent to counties. Louisiana has more Native American tribes than any other southern state, including four that are federally recognized, ten that are state recognized, and four that have not yet received recognition. There has never been an official language in Louisiana, and the state constitution enumerates “the right of the people to preserve, foster, and promote their respective historic, linguistic, and cultural origins,” whether English, French, Spanish, or otherwise. The Port of South Louisiana, located on the Mississippi River between New Orleans and Baton Rouge, is the largest volume shipping port in the Western Hemisphere and 4th largest in the world, as well as the largest bulk cargo port in the world. State financial incentives since 2002 and aggressive promotion have given Louisiana the nickname “Hollywood South”. Because of its distinctive culture within the United States, only Alaska is Louisiana’s rival in popularity as a setting for reality television programs. Louisiana has 5 National Parks, 2 National Heritage Areas, 1 National Historical Trail managed by the NPS, 55 National Historic Monuments, and 1 World Heritage Site.

Audubon Zoo audubonnatureinstitute.org 800.774.7394 Email:[email protected]  
Alexandria Zoo thealexandriazoo.com 318.441.6810 Email:[email protected]  
Cane River Creole National Historical Park, Natchez, Louisiana https://www.nps.gov/cari/index.htm (Note: when entering URL, ensure that the search is for “cari” and not “care.”) (318) 352-0383, ext. 101 or ext. 316 https://www.facebook.com/canerivercreoleNPS

The Cane River region is home to a unique culture; the Creoles. The nearly three hundred year relationship between the Cane River Creoles and their homeland was shaped by the river. This relationship was tested by flood, drought, war, and numerous other obstacles. Their resilience and resourcefulness has allowed the Creole culture to endure and thrive. Both Oakland and Magnolia have plantation stores that contain exhibits and helpful information. The Oakland store is open seven days a week and is a great place to start your visit. The Oakland store is where you’ll find the NPS Passport stamps, Junior Ranger books, historic exhibits, gift shop, and a friendly park ranger to answer any questions that you might have. Magnolia store has limited services and is only open on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. The trails and most of the buildings at Oakland are wheelchair accessible. The main house and Overseer’s house are equipped with wheel chair lifts. The trails at Magnolia are still under development. The Overseer’s house at Magnolia is equipped with a wheelchair lift. Both Oakland and Magnolia Plantations have accessible restrooms.

Jean Lafitte National Historical Park, New Orleans, Louisiana https://www.nps.gov/jela/index.htm (504) 589-3882 https://www.facebook.com/JeanLafitteNPS

Although Jean Lafitte was a pirate/privateer who illegally traded in slaves and generally defied the law, his assistance to the Americans during the British invasion that ended in the Battle of New Orleans in 1815 was invaluable. Jean Lafitte’s six sites are scattered across south Louisiana. Each is unique in its focus, and they all reflect a place where traditions can be generations old but the ground under your feet can change with the weather.

For outdoor activities in a 23,000-acre Louisiana wetland and a Visitor Center with dioramas, exhibits, and hands-on displays, visit the Barataria Preserve in Marrero. The Visitor Center and environmental education center are wheelchair accessible and the following trails are wheelchair accessible: Visitor Center Trail, Palmetto Trail, Bayou Coquille Trail, and the first third of Marsh Overlook Trail.

For talks and tours at the site of the War of 1812’s Battle of New Orleans, visit Chalmette Battlefield in Chalmette. Every year in early January, the anniversary of the Battle of New Orleans is commemorated with reenactors, cannon firings, and more. Stop at the visitor center for exhibits about the battle and how it shaped American history. Chalmette National Cemetery, established in May 1864, is next to the battlefield. The Visitor Center is wheelchair accessible and most of the wayside exhibits are wheelchair accessible. Paved sidewalks run between the visitor center parking area and the Malus-Beauregard House.

For a look at the influences that shaped one of America’s great cities, visit the French Quarter Visitor Center in New Orleans. The Visitor Center is wheelchair accessible. Ranger-guided riverfront history strolls on the Mississippi River levee are in wheelchair accessible areas, though crossing the railroad and streetcar tracks between the visitor center and the levee may be difficult. For the history of the Acadian (Cajun) people who settled southeast Louisiana, ranger talks, and other programs, visit the Acadian Cultural Center in Lafayette. The Center is wheelchair accessible. For the prairie Acadian story, music, dancing, craft demonstrations, and Saturday night at the “Cajun Grand Ole Opry,” visit the Prairie Acadian Cultural Center in Eunice. The Center is wheelchair accessible. For bayou boat tours, free jam sessions with local musicians, history walks, and the story of Louisiana’s bayou country, visit the Wetlands Acadian Cultural Center in Thibodaux. The Center is wheelchair accessible.

Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve not only offers accessible facilities, but also special programs to let more people enjoy more of the treasures of south Louisiana. Call (337) 457-8499 for reservations and more information about accessibility or special needs programs.

New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park, New Orleans, Louisiana https://www.nps.gov/jazz/index.htm (504) 589-4841 https://www.facebook.com/NolaJazzNHP. Only in New Orleans could there be a National Park for jazz! Drop by our Visitor Center at the Old U.S. Mint to inquire about musical events around town. In the mood for a world class musical experience? Attend a jazz concert or ranger performance at the new state of the art performance venue on the 3rd floor of the Old U.S. Mint. National Parks are for everyone so the National Park Service is committed to making every park accessible. New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park not only offers accessible facilities, but also special programs to let more people enjoy Jazz. Service animals are welcome at all sites. Both the Visitors Center at 916 N. Peters Street and the Old U.S. Mint located at 400 Esplanade Avenue are wheelchair accessible. The U.S. Mint has elevator access.
MAINE

Maine is the easternmost state in the United States in both its extreme points and its geographic center. Maine is known for its jagged, rocky coastline; low, rolling mountains; heavily forested interior, and picturesque waterways; and also its seafood cuisine, especially clams and lobster. People have been drawn to the rugged coast of Maine throughout history. The first European settlement in Maine was in 1604 on Saint Croix Island, led by French explorer Pierre Dugua, Sieur de Mons; his party included Samuel de Champlain, noted as an explorer. The French named the entire area Acadia, including the portion that later became the state of Maine. (Note: The name “Acadia” appears in other states, mostly denoting the French settlers of a particular area.) The first English settlement in Maine was established by the Plymouth Company at Popham in 1607. Maine has several unique geographical features. Machias Seal Island and North Rock, off its easternmost point, are claimed by both the U.S. and Canada and are within one of four areas between the two countries whose sovereignty is still in dispute, but it is the only one of the disputed areas containing land. Also in this easternmost area in the Bay of Fundy is the Old Sow, the largest tidal whirlpool in the Western Hemisphere. Maine is the number one U.S. producer of low-bush blueberries. The state is a popular destination for sport hunting (particularly deer, moose and bear), sport fishing, snowmobiling, skiing, boating, camping and hiking, among other activities. Bowdoin College, a liberal arts college, founded in 1794, Colby College in Waterville founded in 1813, and Bates College in Lewiston founded in 1855, collectively form the Colby Bates Bowdoin Consortium and are ranked among the best colleges in the United States, often placing in the top 10% of all liberal arts colleges. Maine has 4 National Parks, 1 Wild & Scenic River managed by the NPS, 1 National Trail managed by the NPS, 44 National Historic Landmarks, and 14 National Natural Landmarks.

Maine Wildlife Park maine.gov/ifw/education/wildlifepark/accessibility.htm 207.657.4977 Email:[email protected]
York’s Wild Kingdom yorkswildkingdom.com 207.363.4911 Email:[email protected]
Acadia National Park, Bar Harbor, Maine https://www.nps.gov/acad/index.htm (207) 288-3338 https://www.facebook.com/AcadiaNPS

Awed by its beauty and diversity, early 20th-century visionaries donated the land that became Acadia National Park. The park is home to many plants and animals, and the tallest mountain on the U.S. Atlantic coast. Today visitors come to Acadia to hike granite peaks, bike historic carriage roads, or relax and enjoy the scenery. The park offers camping sites, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, and snowmobiling. Pets are welcome in several areas, but are restricted from many more. See the website for specifics. The park is surrounded by many nearby attractions. The following web URL contains specific accessibility information for each (https://www.nps.gov/acad/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm). See also the following URL for a complete listing of parks in Maine: http://www.stateparks.com/maine_parks_and_recreation_destinations.html.

Appalachian National Scenic Trail (CT, GA, MA, MD, ME, NC, NH, NJ, NY, PA, TN VA, VT, WV) https://www.nps.gov/appa/index.htm (304) 535-6278 (Harpers Ferry, WV) No Facebook connection found on home page.

Conceived in 1921, built by private citizens, and completed in 1937, today the Appalachian Trail is managed by the National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, numerous state agencies and thousands of volunteers. The Appalachian Trail is a 2,180+ mile long public footpath that traverses the scenic, wooded, pastoral, wild, and culturally resonant lands of the Appalachian Mountains. There are endless hiking opportunities from Georgia to Maine. The Appalachian National Scenic Trail does not currently have a visitor center. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy, a national not-for-profit corporation has a visitor center in Harpers Ferry, WV. The Appalachian Trail has been enjoyed by visitors with a variety of disabilities - including the blind, hearing-impaired, and hikers with a range of mobility limitations. The trail is not highly developed though, and there are only a few sections that are considered fully accessible.

Maine Acadia Culture https://www.nps.gov/maac/index.htm    

The National Park Service does not operate any sites as part of Maine Acadian Culture. Many of the attractions in the St. John Valley are privately operated by non-profit organizations that are part of the Maine Acadian Heritage Council. Please verify site accessibility directly with the managing organizations and check with local chambers of commerce for more information about these or other sites. Maine Acadian Culture is an effort by the National Park Service to assist in conserving the Acadian culture in Maine’s St. John Valley. The National Park Service supports the Maine Acadian Heritage Council, which is an association of historical societies, cultural clubs, towns, and museums working together to preserve Acadian culture (see also the information about Acadian culture under the state of Louisiana). These organizations operate a number of different attractions throughout St. John Valley. Maine Acadians share beliefs and experiences tying them to a common religion, languages, and history. The St. John River, land, and family are essential to their culture. The Acadians are the descendants of French settlers who came to North America from 1604 onward. Most of them originated from the western part of central France. They settled in the territory formerly known as “Acadie.” Acadia (French: Acadie) was a colony of New France in northeastern North America that included parts of eastern Quebec, the Maritime provinces, and modern-day Maine to the Kennebec River. Centered in what are now New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island, Acadia was probably intended to include parts of Maine (U.S.) and Quebec. Most of today’s Acadians live in New Brunswick, P.E.I. and Nova Scotia, with some in parts of Maine and Quebec. While there are continuing struggles against assimilation and attempts to keep the French language alive, Acadians have increasing control over their education.

Saint Croix Island International Historic Site, Calais, Maine https://www.nps.gov/sacr/index.htm (207) 454-3871 No Facebook address found on home page.

The winter of 1604-1605 on Saint Croix Island was a cruel one for Pierre Dugua’s French expedition. Iced in by freezing temperatures and cut off from fresh water and game, 35 of 79 men died. As spring arrived and native people traded game for bread, the health of those remaining improved. Although the expedition moved on by summer, the beginning of French presence in North America had begun. Walk the interpretive trail, enjoy a picnic, join a Ranger-led program, bird watch, or just sit back and enjoy the scenery. There is no public access to Saint Croix Island. At the mainland facility, the ranger station, interpretive trail and shelter, parking lot, pathways, and restrooms are accessible. Parking near the shore is not recommended due to the steep grade. From midMay through Columbus Day, a bilingual (French-English) park ranger is available most days. Visit Operating House and Seasons for Visitor Center hours and the Schedule of Events for program descriptions and times.

MARYLAND

One of the original Thirteen Colonies, Maryland is considered to be the birthplace of religious freedom in America, when it was formed by George Calvert in the early 17th century as an intended refuge for persecuted Catholics from England. Maryland is a Mid-Atlantic state that’s defined by its abundant waterways and coastlines on the Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Ocean. Its largest city, Baltimore, has a long history as a major seaport. Fort McHenry, birthplace of the U.S. national anthem, sits at the mouth of Baltimore’s Inner Harbor, home to the National Aquarium and Maryland Science Center. Maryland has the highest median household income of any state. There is a population of rare wild (feral) horses found on Assateague Island. Every year during the last week of July, feral horses are captured and waded across a shallow bay for sale at Chincoteague, Virginia. This conservation technique ensures the tiny island is not overrun by the horses. The ponies and their sale were popularized by the children’s book, Misty of Chincoteague. They are believed to be descended from horses who escaped from shipwrecks. The purebred Chesapeake Bay Retriever dog was bred specifically for water sports, hunting and search and rescue in the Chesapeake area. In 1878 the Chesapeake Bay Retriever was the first individual retriever breed recognized by the American Kennel Club. After England’s “Glorious Revolution,” the overthrow of King James II of England (James VII of Scotland) by a union of English Parliamentarians with the Dutch stadtholder William III, Prince of Orange, of 1688, Maryland outlawed Catholicism. This lasted until after the American Revolutionary War. Wealthy Catholic planters built chapels on their land to practice their religion in relative secrecy. During the War of 1812, the British military attempted to capture Baltimore, which was protected by Fort McHenry. During this bombardment, the song “Star Spangled Banner” was written by Francis Scott Key and it was later adopted as the national anthem. The largest and most significant battle in the state was the Battle of Antietam on September 17, 1862, near Sharpsburg. Although a tactical draw, the battle was considered a strategic Union victory and a turning point of the war. The Progressive Era also brought reforms in working conditions for Maryland’s labor force. In 1902 the state regulated conditions in mines; outlawed child laborers under the age of 12; mandated compulsory school attendance; and enacted the nation’s first workers’ compensation law. The workers’ compensation law was overturned in the courts, but was redrafted and finally enacted in 1910. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Maryland households are currently the wealthiest in the country, with a 2013 median household income of $72,483 that puts it ahead of New Jersey and Connecticut, which are second and third respectively. Maryland ranked No. 1 with the most millionaires per capita in 2013, with a ratio of 7.7 percent. Also, the state’s poverty rate of 7.8 percent is the lowest in the country. Maryland has 18 National Parks, 2 National Heritage Areas, 5 National Trails managed by the NPS, 73 National Historical Landmarks, and 6 National Natural Landmarks.

Antietam National Battlefield, Sharpsburg, Maryland www.nps.gov/anti/index.htm (301) 432-5124 https://www.facebook.com/antietamnps

During the Civil War, Confederate General Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia made their first invasion of the North in what was called the Maryland Campaign of 1862. Lee and his force of around 45,000 men engaged in battle with Union Major General George B. McClellan and his 87,000-strong Army of the Potomac on September 17, 1862. After twelve hours of combat, nearly 23,000 men were dead, wounded, or missing, making Antietam the bloodiest one-day battle in American history. Though the battle was technically a draw, Lee retreated from Maryland the next evening and this Union “victory” gave President Abraham Lincoln the opportunity to issue a preliminary version of the Emancipation Proclamation, which declared that slaves held in rebel states would be free effective January 1, 1863. There is no admission fee for individuals who qualify or possess the National Access Passport; there is a fee for all other visitors. Accessibility features at this site include accessible parking, an accessible Visitor Center, Museum, Theater, Observation Room, and restrooms. Tour Roads are accessible (use your own vehicle, 8½ miles in length with 11 stops, Burnside Bridge, stop 9 requires short sidewalk and a few half-size steps. For wheelchair access, use designated parking. Other nearby key places of interest include: Dunker Church - not accessible but viewable from doorway; Pry House Field Hospital Museum - accessible, use Authorized Vehicle Parking area up a hill (open seasonally, call (301) 695-1864 for more information); Newcomer House, Heart of the Civil War Heritage Area visitor center –accessible (open seasonally, call 301-432-6402 for more information). Visitor feedback on their tour of Antietam is the best way we can improve our accessibility services. Your comments and suggestions are welcome.

Appalachian National Scenic Trail (CT, GA, MA, MD, ME, NC, NH, NJ, NY, PA, TN VA, VT, WV) https://www.nps.gov/appa/index.htm (304) 535-6278 (Harpers Ferry, WV) No Facebook address found on website. Conceived in 1921, built by private citizens, and completed in 1937, today the Appalachian Trail is managed by the National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, numerous state agencies and thousands of volunteers. The Appalachian Trail is a 2,180+ mile long public footpath that traverses the scenic, wooded, pastoral, wild, and culturally resonant lands of the Appalachian Mountains. There are endless hiking opportunities from Georgia to Maine. The Appalachian National Scenic Trail does not currently have a visitor center. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy, a national not-for-profit corporation has a visitor center in Harpers Ferry, WV. The Appalachian Trail has been enjoyed by visitors with a variety of disabilities - including the blind, hearing-impaired, and hikers with a range of mobility limitations. The trail is not highly developed though, and there are only a few sections that are considered fully accessible
Fort McHenry National Monument & Historic Shrine, Baltimore, Maryland www.nps.gov/fomc/index.htm (410) 962-4290 No Facebook address found on website.

After burning the White House, the Capitol, and other government building in Washington, DC, the British force on August 24, 1814, advanced towards Baltimore. To the British, Baltimore was a “nest of pirates,” due to the number of privateers (ships authorized by the government to attack enemy vessels during war) that launched from its waters. In 1813, the British imposed a blockade on the City, and on September 12, 1814, defeated the Maryland Militia at the Battle of North Point. The next day, Vice-Admiral Sir Alexander Cochrane and the British fleet of 19 ships began a 27hour bombardment of Fort McHenry and its 1,000 defenders commanded by Major George Armistead. On September 14, the American flag was raised over the Fort. Upon seeing it, Francis Scott Key wrote a poem later known as “The Star-Spangled Banner,” our National Anthem. The Visitor Center is accessible to people using wheelchairs and features a closed-captioned orientation film. The fort is mostly accessible.

Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, Harpers Ferry, Virginia (MD, VA, WV) https://www.nps.gov/hafe/index.htm (304) 535-6029 https://www.facebook.com/harpersferrynps/ A visit to this quaint, historic community, at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah rivers, is like stepping into the past. Stroll the picturesque streets, visit exhibits and museums, or hike our trails and battlefields. Spend a day or a weekend. We have something for everyone, so come and discover Harpers Ferry! Harpers Ferry National Historical Park offers a wide variety of activities for individuals and families. Explore museums and exhibits, hike to overlooks or along Civil War skirmish lines, join a ranger-guided tour or sign-up for a living history workshop. Shop at the Harpers Ferry Park Association’s Bookshop for books, artwork, postcards, and items for kids of all ages. Talk to rangers and volunteers at the Visitor Center and Information Center who will assist you and answer any questions you may have. Harpers Ferry National Historical Park is open year round with the exception of Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year’s Day. The Cavalier Heights Visitor Center is located at the main entrance of Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. The Visitor Center is open year-round from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and is staffed by park rangers and volunteers. From this location, visitors may park their vehicles and take a shuttle bus to the Lower Town district of the park. Visitor Center Accessibility: Parking: There are accessible parking spaces at the Visitor Center complex. Restrooms: The restroom building’s exterior doors open manually. Wheelchairs: The park has two wheelchairs available that may be borrowed by visitors upon request. Shuttle Bus: The park’s shuttle buses are equipped for those with physical limitations. The buses kneel and have lifts to accommodate those who are unable to utilize the stairs. Lower Town Accessibility: Restrooms: An accessible restroom is located in the Bookshop building on Shenandoah Street. Restrooms are also located on the second floor of the John Brown Museum. Exhibits and Museums: Most exhibits and museums in Lower Town have accessible entrances. These entrances are not always visible from the sidewalk. A map on the website highlights the accessible building entrances. Sidewalks and Trails: The sidewalks in Lower Town are made of various materials including brick, slate, and cobblestone. Trails in Lower Town are mostly compacted dirt. The walkway between the John Brown Fort and The Point is gravel. Shuttle Bus: The park’s shuttle buses are equipped for those with physical limitations. The buses kneel and have lifts to accommodate those who are unable to utilize the stairs. Programs and Tours: Ranger-guided programs vary in topic and tour stops. Please feel free to contact the park ahead of time to ask about program routes and accessibility.
Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historic Park, Church Creek, Maryland https://www.nps.gov/hatu/index.htm (410) 2212290 https://www.facebook.com/TubmanUGRRNPS

“I never ran my train off the track and I never lost a passenger.” Harriet Tubman was a deeply spiritual woman who lived her ideals and dedicated her life to freedom. She is the Underground Railroad’s best known conductor and before the Civil War repeatedly risked her life to guide nearly 70 enslaved people north to new lives of freedom. This new national historical park preserves the same landscapes that Tubman used to carry herself and others away from slavery. The Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center houses permanent exhibits, an A/V program, restrooms, a museum store, an information desk, and a research library, and it serves as the park’s primary visitor destination, opening to the public on March 11, 2017. The Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center, administrative building, picnic pavilion, and legacy garden are fully accessible with handicapped parking available. Service animals are welcome in park facilities and grounds. If you have any questions about accessibility or a request for special accommodations, please contact the park.

Washington-Rochambeau National Historic Trail (CT, DC, DE, MA, MD, NJ, NY, PA, RI, VA) https://www.nps.gov/waro/index.htm (215) 597-1581 https://www.facebook.com/Washington-Rochambeau-Revolutionary-Route-Natio...

In 1781, General Rochambeau’s French Army joined forces with General Washington’s Continental Army to fight the British Army in Yorktown, Virginia. With the French Navy in support, the allied armies moved hundreds of miles to become the largest troop movement of the American Revolution. The effort and cooperation between the two sides led to a victory at Yorktown and secured American independence. Rochambeau’s march north from July 1782 provided Americans an opportunity to give thanks to their country’s ally, for when the French infantry sailed out of Boston Harbor on Christmas Day 1782, King George III and Parliament had acknowledged the United States “to be free Sovereign and independent States.”

The Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historical Trail is over 680 miles of land and water trails that pass through nine states along the eastern coast of the United States. The trail’s large geographic presence serves to connect major metropolitan areas, national and state parks, historic and scenic trails, and countless other historic sites. Visitors can follow the route by exploring these different sites along the trail. Use the links on the website that listing each state to find sites that interpret the trail according to state. More information can also be found through our partner organization, the National Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Association, Inc. at W3R-US.org.

MASSACHUSETTS

The state is named for the Massachusett tribe, which once inhabited the area. Massachusetts has played a significant role in American history since the Pilgrims, seeking religious freedom, founded Plymouth Colony in 1620. Plymouth was the site of the first colony in New England, founded in 1620 by the Pilgrims, passengers of the Mayflower. This was the second successful permanent English colony in the part of North America that later became the United States, after the Jamestown Colony. In 1692, the town of Salem and surrounding areas experienced one of America’s most infamous cases of mass hysteria, the Salem witch trials. As one of the most important of the 13 colonies, Massachusetts became a leader in resisting British oppression. In 1773, the Boston Tea Party protested unjust taxation. The Minute Men started the American Revolution by battling British troops at Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775. Opposition to slavery gradually increased throughout the next few decades. Abolitionists John Brown and Sojourner Truth lived in Springfield and Northampton, respectively, while Frederick Douglass lived in Boston. The works of such abolitionists contributed to Massachusetts’ actions during the Civil War. Massachusetts was the first state to recruit, train, and arm a Black regiment with White officers, the 54th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment. Alexander Graham Bell is commonly credited as the inventor of the first practical telephone. On March 10, 1876 at Boston University, he was able to communicate with his assistant Thomas A. Watson in the next room. In 1852, Massachusetts became the first state to pass compulsory education laws. Harvard University in Cambridge is the oldest institution of higher learning in the United States, with the largest financial endowment of any university, and Harvard Law School has educated a contemporaneous majority of Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States. Massachusetts’ public school students place among the top nations in the world in academic performance. In 1966, Massachusetts became the first state to popularly elect an African American to the U.S. senate with Edward Brooke. Tourism has become an important factor in the economy of the state because of its numerous recreational areas and historical landmarks. Massachusetts has 18 National Parks, 2 National Heritage Areas, 5 National Trails managed by the NPS, 73 National Natural Landmarks, and 14 National Historical Landmarks.

Franklin Park Zoo a/k/a Zoo New England zoonewengland.org/franklin-park-zoo 617.541.5466 Email:[email protected]
New England Aquarium neaq.org 617.973.5200 Email:[email protected]/
Southwick’s Zoo southwickszoo.com 800.258.9182 Email:[email protected]
Adams National Historical Park, Quincy, Massachusetts https://www.nps.gov/adam/index.htm and https://www.nps.gov/adam/planyourvisit/index.htm (617) 770-1175 https://www.facebook.com/AdamsNPS/

From the sweet little farm at the foot of Penn’s Hill to the gentleman’s country estate at Peace field, Adams National Historical Park is the story of “heroes, statesman, philosophers … and learned women” whose ideas and actions helped to transform thirteen disparate colonies into one united nation. The park includes the birthplaces of two presidents, the “summer White House,” Stone Library, the Adams Carriage House, and 13 acres of a historic landscape that reflects the lifestyles and values of four generations of the Adams family. Visitors who are using a motorized wheelchair or assistance vehicle are advised to proceed directly to the historic homes where street parking is available. Motorized chairs and assistance vehicles are not permitted in the historic houses. The park provides non-motorized wheelchairs for loan at the Birthplaces and the Old House at Peace field. The John Adams and John Quincy Adams Birthplaces are wheelchair accessible. The first floor of the Old House at Peace field has limited wheelchair access. The park has a photograph album and guidebook available for viewing at the Old House. For handicapped or disabled access, please call the park ahead on the day of your visit.

Appalachian National Scenic Trail (CT, GA, MA, MD, ME, NC, NH, NJ, NY, PA, TN VA, VT, WV) https://www.nps.gov/appa/index.htm (304) 535-6278 (Harpers Ferry, WV) No Facebook connection found on home page.

Conceived in 1921, built by private citizens, and completed in 1937, today the Appalachian Trail is managed by the National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, numerous state agencies and thousands of volunteers. The Appalachian Trail is a 2,180+ mile long public footpath that traverses the scenic, wooded, pastoral, wild, and culturally resonant lands of the Appalachian Mountains from Georgia to Maine. The Appalachian National Scenic Trail does not currently have a visitor center. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy, a national not-for-profit corporation has a visitor center in Harpers Ferry, WV. The Appalachian Trail has been enjoyed by visitors with a variety of disabilities - including the blind, hearing-impaired, and hikers with a range of mobility limitations. The trail is not highly developed though, and there are only a few sections that are considered fully accessible.

Boston National Historical Park, Boston, Massachusetts https://www.nps.gov/bost/index.htm and https://www.nps.gov/bost/planyourvisit/index.htm (617) 242-5601 – Charlestown Navy Yard Visitor Center https://www.facebook.com/BostonNHP Discover how one city could be the Cradle of Liberty, site of the first major battle of American Revolution, and home to many who espoused that freedom can be extended to all. The 43 acres of Boston National Historical Park encompasses over 350 years of history. The special places that make up the Freedom Trail, the Charlestown Navy Yard, and Dorchester Heights tell many stories that have shaped the United States. Many sites along the Freedom Trail are historic buildings and ships with varying levels of accessibility. See the accessibility notes for each park and park partner site on our Plan Your Visit page. Boston’s Freedom Trail navigates some of the oldest streets and neighborhoods in the city. Sidewalks can often be narrow and uneven. All crosswalks have curb-cuts and crosswalks at stoplights have signals. There are two places where the trail takes stairs: There are marked on-street handicap parking spaces near most historic sites available to any vehicle with a handicap placard. Reserved handicap parking is also available at the Charlestown Navy Yard.
New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park, New Bedford, Massachusetts https://www.nps.gov/nebe/index.htm and https://www.nps.gov/nebe/planyourvisit/basicinfo.htm (508) 996-4095 https://www.facebook.com/NewBedfordNPS

New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park is located in downtown New Bedford, a lively urban setting of historic, stately buildings juxtaposed with contemporary art galleries and funky restaurants. The park is located within a 13-block historic district of cobblestone streets. At the heart of this district is the national park visitor center. The Visitor Center is designed to provide access for wheelchairs throughout the building with accessible ramps, elevators, restrooms, and theater seating. New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park is committed to making all practicable efforts to make the Visitor Center, programs, services, employment, and meaningful work opportunities accessible and usable by all individuals. The national park is located within a historic district that strives to preserve and protect the history of the area and several buildings were built before current accessibility standards were set. Please note the park has cobblestone streets, historic homes, and a working waterfront. The national park’s goal is to provide the highest level of accessibility to our visitors as possible.

The Last Green Valley National Heritage Corridor (CT and MA) http://thelastgreenvalley.org/index.php; http://thelastgreenvalley.org/tlgv/a-national-heritage-corridor/ (860) 774-3300 https://www.facebook.com/pg/LastGreenValley/photos/?ref=page_internal

The Last Green Valley is not a traditional park. The Last Green Valley is the 35town National Heritage Corridor in eastern Connecticut and south-central Massachusetts and has a total population of about 300,000. Congress designated The Last Green Valley as a National Heritage Corridor in 1994. Citizens, businesses, nonprofit cultural and environmental organizations, local and state governments, and the National Park Service work together to preserve and celebrate the region’s cultural, historical and natural heritage. The Last Green Valley is a large area with things to do for all family members. http://thelastgreenvalley.org/explore-the-last-green-valley/100-fun-thin...

Washington-Rochambeau National Historic Trail (CT, DC, DE, MA, MD, NJ, NY, PA, RI, VA) https://www.nps.gov/waro/index.htm (215) 597-1581 https://www.facebook.com/Washington-Rochambeau-Revolutionary-Route-Natio...

In 1781, General Rochambeau’s French Army joined forces with General Washington’s Continental Army to fight the British Army in Yorktown, Virginia. With the French Navy in support, the allied armies moved hundreds of miles to become the largest troop movement of the American Revolution. The effort and cooperation between the two sides led to a victory at Yorktown and secured American independence. Rochambeau’s march north from July 1782 provided Americans an opportunity to give thanks to their country’s ally, for when the French infantry sailed out of Boston Harbor on Christmas Day 1782, King George III and Parliament had acknowledged the United States “to be free Sovereign and independent States.”

The Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historical Trail is over 680 miles of land and water trails that pass through nine states along the eastern coast of the United States. The trail’s large geographic presence serves to connect major metropolitan areas, national and state parks, historic and scenic trails, and countless other historic sites. Visitors can follow the route by exploring these different sites along the trail. Use the links on the website that listing each state to find sites that interpret the trail according to state. More information can also be found through our partner organization, the National Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Association, Inc. at W3R-US.org.

Maryland Zoo marylandzoo.org 410.396.7102 Email:[email protected]
National Aquarium aqua.org 410.576.3800 Email:[email protected]
MICHIGAN

Michigan is the only state to consist of two peninsulas. In 1835, Ohio fought with Michigan in the Toledo War, a mostly bloodless boundary war over the Toledo Strip. Congress intervened, making Michigan’s admittance as a state conditional on ending the conflict. In exchange for giving up its claim to the Toledo Strip, Michigan was given the western two-thirds of the Upper Peninsula, in addition to the eastern third that was already considered part of the state. In addition The Lower Peninsula, to which the name Michigan was originally applied, is often noted to be shaped like a mitten. The Upper Peninsula (often referred to as “the U.P.”) is separated from the Lower Peninsula by the Straits of Mackinac, a five-mile channel that joins Lake Huron to Lake Michigan. The two peninsulas are connected by the Mackinac Bridge. Michigan is a Midwestern U.S. state with the longest freshwater coastline of any political subdivision in the world, being bounded by four of the five Great Lakes, plus Lake Saint Clair. It contains more than 11,000 inland lakes, spread across its lower and upper peninsulas. Its largest city, Detroit, is famed as the seat of the U.S. auto industry, which inspired Diego Rivera’s murals at the Detroit Institute of Arts. Also in Detroit is Hitsville U.S.A., original headquarters of the Motown record company.

During the War of 1812, Michigan Territory (effectively consisting of Detroit and the surrounding area) was surrendered after a nearly bloodless siege in 1812. An attempt to retake Detroit resulted in a severe American defeat in the River Raisin Massacre. This battle is still the bloodiest ever fought in the state and had the highest number of American casualties of any battle in the war. Michigan was the first state to abolish the death penalty. With its rapid growth in industry, Michigan was an important center of union industry-wide organizing, such as the rise of the United Auto Workers. Grand Rapids is the second largest city in Michigan, and the largest city in West Michigan. Although local employment in the industry is lower than at its historic peak, Grand Rapids remains a leading city in office furniture production. It incorporated trends to use steel and other manufactured materials in furniture, with ergonomic designs for chairs, computer stations, and other furnishings. Grand Rapids, Michigan, was named the “Best Beer Scene” in the 2017 U.S.A. Today’s 10 Best Poll. In 1920, WWJ (AM) in Detroit became the first radio station in the United States to regularly broadcast commercial programs. Michigan typically ranks third or fourth in overall Research & Development (R&D) expenditures in the U.S. Agriculture also serves a significant role, making the state a leading grower of fruit in the U.S., including blueberries, cherries, apples, grapes and peaches. There are 5 National Parks, 1 National Heritage Area, 1 National Trail managed by the NPS, 41 National Historic Landmarks, and 14 National Natural Landmarks.

Binder Park Zoo binderparkzoo.org 269.979.1351 Email:[email protected]
Detroit Zoological Society detroitzoo.org 248.541.5717 Email:[email protected] [email protected]
John Ball Zoo jbzoo.org 616.336.4301 Email:[email protected]
Potter Park potterparkzoo.org 517.342.2710 Email:[email protected]
Isle Royale National Park, Houghton, Michigan https://www.nps.gov/isro/index.htm (906) 482-0984 https://www.facebook.com/Isle-Royale-National-Park-127161610664143/

Isle Royale National Park is a remote island wilderness in the middle of Lake Superior. It is only accessible by ferry, seaplane, or private watercraft. Weather influences traveling to and from the island, as well as your trip once you arrive. Surrounded by Lake Superior, Isle Royale offers unparalleled solitude and adventures for backpackers, hikers, boaters, kayakers, canoeists and scuba divers. The Houghton, Rock Harbor and Windigo Visitor Centers are accessible and have accessible restrooms. Staff members of the Rock Harbor and Windigo Visitor Centers operate a golf cart that assists visitors to and from the visitor center, Rock Harbor Lodge, and restrooms. The golf cart does have high clearance and can be difficult to load and disembark. Please contact the park and your transportation provider prior to arrival. The National Park Service vessels are accessible. Please inform staff when making reservations to facilitate assistance. Ranger III crew will gladly assist with loading and unloading up and down the gangplanks. On the lower deck, the Ranger III Grill and restrooms are accessible. Boat Tours: The Sandy can accommodate a wheelchair. Loading and unloading may be tricky depending on water levels. The boat tour is accessible, but hikes during the tours are not accessible (Passage Island, Lookout Louise, Edison Fishery). At the Daisy Farm and Rock Harbor Campgrounds, there is one accessible shelter. However, trails to those shelters are not accessible. (What’s the point of an accessible shelter if there is no accessible trail to that shelter? Editor) The fees you pay while visiting Isle Royale National Park stay within the park and improve and upgrade services and facilities. NO pets are allowed. Without a Service Dog Permit (see details on website), even service dogs will not be allowed on Isle Royale.

Keweenaw National Historical Park, Calumet, Michigan https://www.nps.gov/kewe/index.htm (906) 337-3168 https://www.facebook.com/KeweenawNHP

Visiting Keweenaw National Historical Park is different from visiting many other national park sites across the country. The park was established to preserve and interpret the history of copper mining on the Keweenaw Peninsula through partnerships. The National Park Service works with a variety of organizations, including public and private entities, to achieve this goal. The Calumet Visitor Center has three floors of fully accessible exhibits of interactive exhibits, films, and ranger talks. Please call ahead to confirm hours of operation. Most visitor services for Keweenaw National Historical Park, such as guided tours or museums, are provided by the park’s partners known as Keweenaw Heritage Sites. The 21 Keweenaw Heritage Sites contain significant cultural and/or natural resources and make a unique contribution to the copper mining story. Embodying stories of hardship, ingenuity, struggle and success, each site allows you to explore the role mining played in people’s lives here and afar. Heritage sites operate independently of the National Park Service. Admissions and hours may vary. Sites stretch along the length of the Keweenaw Peninsula, from Copper Harbor to south of Ontonagon. Many of our Heritage Sites also have facilities or services that are wheelchair accessible. Contact each site for specific information (see website for listings).

Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, Empire Michigan https://www.nps.gov/slbe/index.htm (231) 326-4700 https://www.facebook.com/sbdnl

Miles of sand beach, bluffs that tower 450’ above Lake Michigan, lush forests, clear inland lakes, unique flora and fauna make up the natural world of Sleeping Bear Dunes. High dunes afford spectacular views across the lake. An island lighthouse, US Life-Saving Service stations, coastal villages, and picturesque farmsteads reflect the park’s rich maritime, agricultural, and recreational history.

A good place to look for the latest information on accessibility is the Disabled Traveler’s Companion website. While not officially affiliated with the National Park Service, they have been working with Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore and other National Parks to provide valuable information to the disabled traveler. Their website contains information on photographs, campgrounds, and park attractions that may help in planning your visit to Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore. Most public facilities within the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore are wheelchair accessible as are the overlooks found along the Pierce Stocking Scenic Drive. Each campground has handicapped accessible campsites. The Philip A. Hart Visitor Center in Empire is a great place to start your visit and to find out more about the park’s features and facilities. It has accessible parking, exhibits, auditorium, bookstore and a short, multimedia presentation introducing visitors to the Sleeping Bear Dunes. Restrooms, water fountain, and telephone are all accessible. Pierce Stocking Scenic Drive offers a 7.4 mile loop with beautiful views of Lake Michigan, the Glen lakes and the dunes, much of which can be appreciated through the vehicle windows. The twelve stops along the way have accessible parking and toilets at four locations. (See the website for more details about Pierce Stocking Scenic Drive.) The Dune Climb facilities include accessible restrooms with running water, picnic tables located under the trees, and drinking fountains. The Dune Center Bookstore is also accessible. Sand Wheelchairs are available at the Maritime Museum boathouse and at the Cannery to enable handicapped individuals to enjoy the dunes and beaches. The wheelchairs must stay in the area where they were loaned. Other nearby points of interest, including The Blacksmith Shop in Glen Haven Historic Village, D.H. Day General Store, The Cannery Boat Museum, Coast Guard Station Life-Saving Museum, D.H. Day Campground, Platte River Campground, Platte River Picnic Area, and Platte River Point, are all accessible (with some limitations). (See the website for specific accessibility issues on each of these areas.)

MINNESOTA

Minnesota is a midwestern U.S. state bordering Canada and Lake Superior, the largest of the Great Lakes. It is home to more than 10,000 lakes, including Lake Itasca, headwaters of the Mississippi River. Minnesota’s standard of living index is among the highest in the United States, and the state is also among the best-educated and wealthiest in the nation. Minnesota has some of the Earth’s oldest rocks, gneisses that are about 3.6 billion years old (80 percent as old as the planet). Much of the remainder of the state outside the northeast has 50 feet or more of glacial till left behind as the last glaciers retreated. Approximately 10.6 million acres of wetlands are contained within Minnesota’s borders, the most of any state except Alaska. The state has the nation’s largest population of timber wolves outside Alaska. Saint Paul, located in east-central Minnesota along the banks of the Mississippi River, has been Minnesota’s capital city since 1849, first as capital of the Territory of Minnesota, and then as state capital since 1858. Saint Paul is adjacent to Minnesota’s most populous city, Minneapolis; they and their suburbs are known collectively as the Twin Cities metropolitan area, the 13th-largest metropolitan area in the United States and home to about 60 percent of the state’s population. The “Twin Cities” of Minneapolis and state capital Saint Paul are dense with cultural landmarks like the Science Museum of Minnesota and the Walker Art Center, a modern art museum. Minnesotans have also made significant contributions to comedy, theater, media, and film. The comic strip Peanuts was created by St. Paul native Charles M. Schulz. Garrison Keillor resurrected old-style radio comedy with A Prairie Home Companion, which has aired since 1974. A cult sci-fi cable TV triumph, Mystery Science Theater 3000, was created by Joel Hodgson in Hopkins, and Minneapolis. Another popular comedy staple developed in the 1990s, The Daily Show, was originated through Lizz Winstead and Madeleine Smithberg. Minnesota has 5 National Parks, 1 Wild and Scenic River managed by the NPS, 1 National Trail managed by the NPS, 25 National Historic Landmarks, and 8 National Natural Landmarks.

Como Park Zoo and Conservatory comozooconservatory.org 651.487.8201 Email:[email protected]
Sea Life Minnesota Aquarium visitsealife.com/minnesota 952.853.0612 Email:[email protected]
Grand Portage National Monument, Grand Portage, Minnesota https://www.nps.gov/grpo/index.htm (218) 475-0123 https://www.facebook.com/GrandPortageNationalMonument

Explore the partnership of the Grand Portage Ojibwe and the North West Company during the North American fur trade and the NPS today. Experience the sights and smells of a bustling depot reconstructed in its exact location. Hear the beat of the drum echo over Gichigami - Lake Superior. A sidewalk connects the parking area, which has two accessible parking areas, to the Heritage Center. Two floors of exhibits in the Heritage Center are completely accessible. The sidewalk outside the Heritage Center continues to the crosswalk at Mile Creek Road (County Road 17). Please use caution while crossings as Mile Creek Road is the most used road by Grand Portage. After the crosswalk, the path becomes a hardened gravel accessible trail throughout the historic site. The path goes through the Ojibwe Village. A path that does not meet accessibility standards leads down to the Voyageurs Encampment. A ramp connects the canoe warehouse to the hardened pathway. Interpretive exhibits include the largest birchbark canoes you will ever see plus displays and programs presented inside, all of which are accessible. A ramp located on the west side of the kitchen, allows entry to the back door of the kitchen. Another ramp from the kitchen’s east side, allows access to the main gate under the gatehouse and a view of the Grand Portage footpath and the Mount Rose Trail which are not accessible pathways. An accessible breezeway connects the kitchen to the great hall which also accessibly connects to all porches of the reconstructed kitchen and great hall. Interpretive exhibits, hands-on displays, video programs and ranger conducted interpretive activities that are offered in these buildings are accessible. Restrooms in the historic site are connected to the accessible trail. Each restroom includes an accessible stall. The Three Sisters garden bed located outside the palisade by the Ojibwe Village shows a traditional Native American style of planting. The Three Sisters – corn, beans, and squash – are grown together in a field. The Three Sisters balance and nourish each other. Corn is planted in hills and feeds heavily on the soil. Beans send their runners up the corn stalks and add nitrogen to the soil. Squash is planted at the ends of corn fields and also between corn plots in a field. Squash sends its long, prickly runners through the small rows discouraging both small animals and weeds as well as helping to hold moisture in the ground. The historic seeds used in today’s garden are called Heirlooms. Heirlooms are open-pollinated seeds that were grown before the 1940s. Learn how seeds were among many objects traded by the Indians and early settlers. From 1854, when Grand Portage Indian Reservation was formed, to the present, Ojibwe people, historians and archaeologists have protected the artifacts, history and cultural and natural heritage of Grand Portage.

Mississippi National River and Recreation Area, Saint Paul, Minnesota https://www.nps.gov/miss/index.htm (651) 293-0200 This is the general phone line at the Visitor Center, which is staffed every day except Mondays. https://www.facebook.com/MississippiRiverNPS/

In the middle of a bustling urban setting, this 72 mile river park offers quiet stretches for fishing, boating and canoeing. Other spots are excellent for birdwatching, bicycling and hiking. And there are plenty of visitor centers that highlight the history and science of the Mississippi River. If you are interested in the Mississippi River, this is a great place to start your exploration.

Because the Mississippi National River and Recreation Area is made up of many local, regional, state, and national entities, it is difficult to describe the accessibility of all facilities and trails, especially those managed by other units of government and private organizations. Museums, such as the Science Museum of Minnesota and the Mill City Museum, are up to modern accessibility standards. Trails that run through parks are sometimes of mixed surfaces, although many are paved. National Park Service facilities, including rented facilities, within this large park are accessible. This includes a short trail at Coldwater Spring, which is packed hard-surfaced gravel with gentle grades acceptable for wheelchair use. Other trails at this location are informal dirt paths, sometimes with steep slopes, which are rough and muddy after rains. The Mississippi River Visitor Center (open year round) is accessible from the Science Museum of Minnesota’s parking ramp via elevators. The Upper St. Anthony Falls Visitor Center (closed seasonally) is accessible via an elevator. The lock and dam tour, however, is not accessible as there are flights of stairs that cannot be avoided. Use our Mississippi River Companion (on the website) to find your way around the park by foot, bike, canoe, boat, or car. Among the things to do at the park are fishing (fishing licenses and/or trout tags may be needed in some areas), bicycling, camping, and walking and hiking. Selected walks are generally on hard-surfaced trails, relatively level and generally shorter than hikes. They also usually have amenities, such as restrooms and drinking water and easy access/parking. Geocaching is an outdoor game where participants use GPS receivers to find cleverly hidden caches. A typical cache is a small container with a logbook and possible trinket. Within the Mississippi National River and Recreation Area, there are many geocaches to hunt down and many places of interest to explore.

Voyageurs National Park, International Falls, Minnesota https://www.nps.gov/voya/index.htm (218) 283-6600 https://www.facebook.com/VoyageursNPS

In Voyageurs National Park, you can see and touch rocks half as old as the world, experience the life of a voyageur, immerse yourself in the sights and sounds of a boreal forest, view the dark skies, or ply the interconnected water routes. When we think of the changes that have occurred in what is now Voyageurs National Park over time, natural features that define it take on a kaleidoscopic quality--as glaciers, lakes and forests advance, retreat, change, disappear, and return again and again over time. Forty percent of the park consists of the waters of Rainy, Kabetogama, Namakan, and Sand Point Lakes. These waters were the transportation corridors for the park’s namesake, the voyageurs, and they are the basis for recreation in the park today. The park headquarters has a handicapped accessible entrance and restrooms. There are handicapped accessible entrances and restrooms at all three Visitor Centers (Rainy Lake Visitor Center, Kabetogama Lake Visitor Center, and Ash River Visitor Center. The Oberholtzer Trail is accessible the first 1/4 mile, located near the Rainy Lake Visitor Center. At the Kabetogama Lake Overlook, the 0.2 miles to the overlook is accessible, located along the Meadwood Road to the Ash River Visitor Center. Boat Tours: National Park Service vessels are accessible, and accessible lifts are located at the Rainy Lake, Kabetogama and Ash River boat launch areas. Accessible Campsites are located on Rainy Lake (R26-Sunrise Point) and Namakan Lake (N41- Voyageur Narrows) as well as the Rainy Lake Group Campsite (R74) and the Kabetogma Lake Group Campsite (K54). Reservations are required (a link is provided on the website). On a cloudless night in northern Minnesota, due to a lack of light sources, millions of stars glow brightly. On occasion, when an adventurous visitor stays up well past the typical bedtime, the greens, yellows, and reds of the Aurora Borealis flare overhead. Discover the park after dark. Whether day or night, understand the science that connects the park to everything and all of us.

MISSISSIPPI

Mississippi is heavily forested outside of the Mississippi Delta area, between the Mississippi and Yazoo rivers. The state’s catfish aquaculture farms produce the majority of farm-raised catfish consumed in the United States. Mississippi has a humid subtropical climate with long summers and short, mild winters. Descendant Native American tribes of the Mississippian culture in the Southeast include the Chickasaw and Choctaw. Other tribes who inhabited the territory of Mississippi (and whose names were honored by colonists in local towns) include the Natchez, the Yazoo, and the Biloxi. Since 2011 Mississippi has been ranked as the most religious state in the country. Blacks and whites in Mississippi generated rich, quintessentially American music traditions: gospel music, country music, jazz, blues, and rock and roll. All were invented, promulgated or heavily developed by Mississippi musicians, many of them African American, and most came from the Mississippi Delta. Many musicians carried their music north to Chicago, where they made it the heart of that city’s jazz and blues. In 1966, the state was the last to repeal officially statewide prohibition of alcohol. Before that, Mississippi had taxed the illegal alcohol brought in by bootleggers. Governor Paul Johnson urged repeal and the sheriff “raided the annual Junior League Mardi Gras ball at the Jackson Country Club, breaking open the liquor cabinet and carting off the Champagne before a startled crowd of nobility and high-ranking state officials.” After the Civil War, most African Americans left white churches to establish their own independent congregations, particularly Baptist churches, establishing state associations and a national association by the end of the century. English, Scottish and Scots-Irish are generally the most underreported ancestry groups in both the South Atlantic States and the East South Central States. The historian David Hackett Fischer estimated that a minimum 20% of Mississippi’s population is of English ancestry, though the figure is probably much higher, and another large percentage is of Scottish ancestry. Many Mississippians of such ancestry identify simply as American on questionnaires, because their families have been in North America for centuries. Mississippi has 8 National Parks and 3 National Heritage Area, 1 National Trail managed by the NPS, 39 National Historic Landmarks, and 5 National Natural Landmarks.

Jackson Zoological Zoo jacksonzoo.org 601.352.2580 Email:[email protected]
Institute for Marine Mammal Studies imms.org 228.896.9182 Email:[email protected] [email protected] (PR Director)
Tupelo Buffalo Park and Zoo tupelobuffalopark.com 662.844.8709 Email:[email protected]
Gulf Islands National Seashore, Gulf Breeze, Florida, and West Ship Island, Mississippi https://www.nps.gov/guis/index.htm (850) 934-2600 https://www.facebook.com/GulfIslandsNPS

Poet John Masefield wrote, “I must go down to the seas again, for the call of the running tide is a wild call and a clear call that may not be denied.” Millions of visitors are drawn to the islands in the northern Gulf of Mexico for the white sandy beaches, the aquamarine waters, a boat ride, a camping spot, a tour of an old fort, or a place to fish. Park Headquarters at Naval Live Oaks offers exhibits with a wide range of accessibility features, including telephone handsets for audio description, a tactile model of an oak tree, a railing system that connects all the exhibits together, and tactile models of natural history objects including acorns, oak leaves, and a large gopher tortoise. The first loop of the Brackenridge Trail is now an accessible boardwalk with tactile waysides. The Fort Barrancas Visitor Center has accessible museum exhibits including a small scale replica of Fort Barrancas and the Water Battery. Exhibits and the film of Fort Barrancas are audio described. The Fort Pickens Museum has interactive and universally-designed exhibits featuring the natural and cultural stories of Gulf Islands National Seashore. Access is limited to historic structures including: Fort Pickens, Fort Barrancas, and the Advanced Redoubt. The Fort Pickens fishing pier is accessible. The Perdido Key Discovery Trail and six beach cross-over boardwalks (two to sound; four to Gulf) are wheelchair accessible. Beach wheelchairs are available at Johnson Beach at the Perdido key, Santa Rosa Day Use (Opal Beach), and Fort Pickens Areas. On West Ship Island, in Mississippi, the lower level of Fort Massachusetts is accessible. A beach wheelchair is available on the island during tour boat season, which runs from March through October. Visit the park’s new accessible exhibits and outdoor waysides at the Davis Bayou Visitor Center. Boardwalk trails, campsites and the fishing pier are accessible.

Mississippi Delta National Heritage Area, Cleveland, Mississippi https://www.nps.gov/mide/index.htm (662) 846-4312  

This is the phone number for the Mississippi Delta National Heritage Area at the Delta Center for Culture and Learning at Delta State University. Facebook: No Facebook contact found on website. The Blues, Welty, Wright, Williams, Civil War and Civil Rights, The Great Flood, Bogues and Bayous, Plantations, The Great Migration, Rock ‘n’ Roll, Soul Food, King Cotton, The River, Precision Agriculture, Catfish, Gospel, Immigrants’ Stories, Highway 61, Segregation, Integration, Share Cropping, Freedom Songs, Freedom Summer, Folk Tales, Swamp Forests, Hunting Clubs, and surprisingly, hot tamales. The Mississippi Delta National Heritage Area (MDNHA) is the land where the Blues began, where Rock and Roll was created and where Gospel remains a vibrant art. It is an agricultural region where cotton was once king, and where ‘precision-ag’ rules today. It is a place that saw the struggles of the Civil War and the cultural revolution of the Civil Rights Movement. It is the home of the Great Migration, and a land of rich culinary, religious, artistic and literary heritage. There are some places in our nation whose influence on our history and the society we live in has been so pervasive – has become so much a part of who we are –that we don’t often think about or recognize their value. The Mississippi Delta is such a place, and its legacy which has given our nation much in terms of music, political action, race relations, literature and foodways. The MDNHA’s mission is to foster preservation, perpetuation and celebration of the Mississippi Delta’s heritage through collaboration and sustainable economic development. The MDNHA was designated by Congress in 2009. The MDNHA is managed by the Delta Center for Culture and Learning at Delta State University and is governed by a 15-member board representing agencies and organizations defined in its Congressional legislation. The MDNHA includes 18 counties that contain land located in the alluvial floodplain of the Mississippi Delta. There are 12 National Heritage Areas (NHA) in the Southeast besides the Mississippi Delta, some of which are the Augusta Canal NHA, Cane River NHA, and Blue Ridge NHA. Each NHA has its own website so the viewer can select one or more of interest.

Natchez National Historical Park, Natchez, Mississippi https://www.nps.gov/natc/index.htm (601) 446-5790 https://www.facebook.com/NATCHEZNPS

Discover the history of all the peoples of Natchez, Mississippi, from European settlement, African enslavement, the American cotton economy, to the Civil Rights struggle on the lower Mississippi River. Begin your visit at Natchez Visitor Center where you will find park maps and information, as well as staff and volunteers who can help you plan your visit to Natchez’s historic sites. Visit the William Johnson House and Melrose, two widely different homes lived in during the antebellum era (pre-Civil War times). Natchez National Historical Park welcomes people with disabilities. Please be aware that due to the uniqueness of the park -- its historic setting -- some areas may be more difficult to access than others. Natchez Visitor Center has accessible parking spaces; the Visitor Center doors are equipped with electronic opening devices; and there are accessible restrooms. Melrose has accessible parking spaces in the main parking lot; the sidewalks at Melrose are made of various materials including brick and concrete; trails at Melrose are compacted dirt; all of the outbuildings at Melrose have accessible entrance. The wheelchair lift at the main house (mansion) is not working. In addition the video of the second floor is temporarily unavailable. A virtual tour of the first floor of the Melrose main house is available online. (Note: This information was valid as of March 15, 2017. It may have been updated.) The Melrose estate has accessible restrooms. The William Johnson House has only two handicap parking spaces on the street (see website for specific locations). There may be other accessible parking spaces nearby. A wheelchair lift provides accessible access to the second floor area. Restrooms are accessible. Please feel free to contact the park ahead of time to ask about ranger-guided program routes and accessibility.

Natchez Trace Parkway (AL, MS, TN) https://www.nps.gov/natr/index.htm (800) 305-7417 https://www.facebook.com/NatchezTraceParkwayNPS

The Natchez Trace Parkway is a 444-mile drive through exceptional scenery and 10,000 years of North American history. Used by American Indians, “Kaintucks,” settlers, and future presidents, the Old Trace played an important role in American history. Today, visitors can enjoy not only a scenic drive but also hiking, biking, horseback riding, and camping. The Natchez Trace Parkway is a designated bicycle route. Whether you are traveling the parkway from Natchez to Nashville, or a section in between, here are a few of our (NPS Rangers) favorite places... “Sunken Trace at milepost 41.5. This stop gives you one of the iconic pictures from the Natchez Trace. Just a short five minute walk can send you back in time over 200 years. From this spot it is easy to imagine traveling the Old Natchez Trace by foot before the automobile.” ~ Ranger Andy “Jeff Busby Little Mountain at milepost 193.1. Atop the summit, you can see the hills of Mississippi or follow the 1/2 mile loop down into to a shady hollow.” ~ Ranger Kathryn “Buzzard Roost Spring at milepost 320.3. It is one of my favorite little-known stops. The Water from the spring is a vibrant almost opaque blue, and it’s a great spot to relax and listen to the water as is gushes forth from the earth.” ~ Ranger Jake For more “places to go,” follow the links on the website divided by geographic sections from south to north (through Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee). There are numerous activities along the Natchez Trace Parkway that are accessible to people with varying abilities. From paved overlooks and trails to Visitor Centers, there are opportunities to get out of your car and experience the Parkway. See this website link for a list of 18 accessible facilities and features may help you plan your trip (https://www.nps.gov/natr/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm). In addition to the listed locations, each pullout along the Parkway has a routed sign that can be read from the vehicle. Interpretive signs at trailheads and parking areas are also wheelchair accessible.

Vicksburg National Military Park, Vicksburg, Mississippi https://www.nps.gov/vick/index.htm (601) 636-0583 https://www.facebook.com/vicksburgnmp.nps/

“Vicksburg is the nail head that holds the South’s two halves together...Vicksburg is the key.” Two statements, two Presidents, both aware of the importance of the city on the Mississippi River. President Davis knew it was vital to hold the city for the Confederacy to survive. President Lincoln wanted the key to gain control of the river and divide the South. Vicksburg National Military Park commemorates this campaign and its significance as a critical turning point of the Civil War. Vicksburg National Military Park has 16 miles of paved roads open for touring by private and commercial tour vehicles. Visitors with special needs may tour the park on their own with the use of a self-guiding park tour folder, purchase an audio CD tour, access the park’s cell phone tour, or hire a licensed battlefield guide. Three of the tours available, all of which have fees except #3 below, include: (1) Self-Guided Driving Tour Using the Official Park Brochure and Map (Every visitor receives an Official Park Brochure and Map upon entrance to the site, which details the driving routes, tour stops, and provides a brief history of the Vicksburg Campaign and Siege); (2) Licensed Park Tour Guides (Tours [approximately two hours] can be arranged for individuals, families, and large groups, and the services can be provided upon request, but reservations are preferred. Availability information and reservations can be made through the Vicksburg Convention and Visitors Bureau by calling (601) 636-0583 or (601) 636-3827); and (3) Cell Phone Driving Tour (Simply dial a specified number at each tour stop and hear a brief 30second description of the site’s significance. This option can be used along with the free park brochure and tour map. ‘How-to’ instructions are available at the main Visitor Center). All visitor facilities at Vicksburg National Military Park are handicapped accessible, and handicapped parking spaces are designated in the lots at the Clay Street Visitor Center and the USS Cairo Exhibit. Visitors must display the appropriate handicapped hang tag and/or license plate. There are 15 designated tours stops along the park road, each with a pull-off for vehicle parking, allowing partial accessibility to various wayside plaques and monuments. The Clay Street Visitor Center and USS Cairo exhibit and museum are fully accessible. Restrooms are located outside each building in the attached breezeways.

MISSOURI

Missouri played a central role in the westward expansion of the United States, as memorialized by the Gateway Arch, because it served as a major departure point for expeditions and settlers heading to the West during the 19th century. St. Charles, just west of St. Louis, was the starting point and the return destination of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. The Pony Express, Oregon Trail, Santa Fe Trail, and California Trail all began in Missouri. The musical styles of ragtime, Kansas City jazz, and St. Louis Blues, developed in Missouri. Missouri has also been called the “Cave State” because there are more than 6000 recorded caves in the state (second to Tennessee). However, Missouri’s most famous nickname is the “Show Me State,” as Missourians are known for being skeptical. Thousands of visitors travel to the state to view the country-music shows of Branson; Bass Pro Shops national headquarters (Springfield); the Gateway Arch at the Jefferson National Expansion (St. Louis); Mark Twain’s boyhood home (Hannibal); the President Harry S. Truman home and library (Independence); the scenic beauty of the Ozark National Scenic Riverways; and the Pony Express and Jesse James museums (St. Joseph). Missouri has 6 National Parks, 3 National Trails managed by the NPS, 1 National Heritage Area, 37 National Historic Landmarks, and 16 National Natural Landmarks.

Kansas City Zoo kansascityzoo.org 816.595.1234 Email:[email protected]
Saint Louis Zoological Park stlzoo.org 314.781.0900 Email:[email protected] INFORMATION
California National Historic Trail (CA, CO, ID, KS, MO, NE, NV, OR, UT, WY) https://www.nps.gov/cali/index.htm (801) 741-1012 https://www.facebook.com/oregoncalifornianps

Between 1841 and 1869, more than a quarter million people answered this call and crossed the plains and mountains to the West. These emigrants started their journeys in Kansas and Missouri, walking more than 2,000 miles for months in pursuit of a better life. The California and Oregon Trails follow the same route until Idaho, where they diverge, the Oregon Trail turning north to Oregon and the California Trail heading to California. A complete summary is set forth under the state of California, the final destination of the trail.

Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, St. Louis, Missouri https://www.nps.gov/jeff/index.htm (314) 655-1600 https://www.facebook.com/GatewayArchNPS

The Gateway Arch reflects St. Louis’ role in the Westward Expansion of the United States during the nineteenth century. The park is a memorial to Thomas Jefferson’s role in opening the West, to the pioneers who helped shape its history, and to Dred Scott who sued for his freedom in the Old Courthouse. “Journey to the Top” tram rides at the Gateway Arch were temporarily suspended to replace the motor generator sets and upgrade the tram’s electrical system, but are expected to resume in late-April 2017. “We encourage everyone to visit the Old Courthouse to view free exhibit galleries focusing on early St. Louis, Lewis and Clark’s Corps of Discovery expedition and the settlement of the Great Plains; restored original courtrooms; and an exhibit focused on Dred and Harriet Scott,” says Rhonda Schier, Chief of Museum Services and Interpretation at Jefferson National Expansion Memorial. “Visitors can also participate in living history events with mock trials in the Old Courthouse’s restored courtrooms.”

The National Park Service and its partners welcome all visitors and make many efforts to accommodate people with disabilities in the Old Courthouse, the Gateway Arch complex, and on the park grounds. The park has accessible exhibits and programs and offers various assistive devices. Regretfully, we do not offer access for wheelchairs, scooters, or strollers to the top levels of the Gateway Arch or the Old Courthouse. Other than the trams to the top, the Gateway Arch complex and surrounding grounds are fully accessible. The lobby, Museum of Westward Expansion, theaters, and museum stores are all accessible by ramps and elevators. Most of the first floor of the Old Courthouse is accessible to wheelchairs, but the upper floors of the Old Courthouse are reachable only by climbing stairs. On the first floor, it is necessary to climb two stairs to enter the theater or the Museum Shop. A wheelchair lift provides access to the Old Courthouse from Broadway, on the west side of the building. The exhibits and restrooms on the first floor of the Old Courthouse are fully accessible.

Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail (ID,IL,IA,KS,MO,MT,NE,ND,OR,SD,WA) https://www.nps.gov/lecl/index.htm (402) 661-1804 (Omaha, Nebraska) https://www.facebook.com/lewisandclarknht

St. Charles, just west of St. Louis, was the starting point and the return destination of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Between May 1804 and September 1806, 31 men, one woman, and a baby traveled from the plains of the Midwest to the shores of the Pacific Ocean and back. They called themselves the Corps of Discovery. In their search for a water route to the Pacific Ocean, they opened a window into the west for the young United States. Over two hundred years later, visitors can retrace the Expedition’s path by following the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Among the more than 100 sites along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail, only five are National Park Service sites. To learn more about sites along the Trail, visit the Basic Information page under the Plan Your Visit section on the website. The Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail Headquarters Visitor Center is a handicapped accessible site. Bathrooms and most displays are accessible to those who are mobility impaired. The interpretive film is also accessible, has open caption and full audio.

National Historic Trail – Trail of Tears (AL, AR, GA, IL, KY, MO, NC, OK, TN) https://www.nps.gov/trte/index.htm (505) 988-6098 No Facebook listing was found.

Remember and commemorate the survival of the Cherokee people, forcefully removed from their homelands in Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee to live in Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail passes through the present-day states of Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Tennessee. A complete summary is set forth under the state of Alabama, one of the origins of the Trail.

Pony Express National Historic Trail (CA, CO, KS, MO, NE, NV, UT, WY) https://www.nps.gov/poex/index.htm (801) 741-1012 (NM; office of National Trails Intermountain Region) https://www.facebook.com/PonyExpressNPS It is hard to believe that young men once rode horses to carry mail from Missouri to California in the unprecedented time of only 10 days. This relay system along the Pony Express National Historic Trail in eight states was the most direct and practical means of east-west communications before the telegraph. Trip planning along the trail can be challenging given the vast number of land jurisdictions the trail passes through. We recommend contacting the nearest visitors and convention bureau to where you plan to visit for each day you are traveling along the trail or contact the individual sites or parks directly. Our Auto Tour Route guides provide detailed information to help you plan your visit. The Trip Itineraries page offers state or regional trips - come back to this page often as we amass more trip itineraries for you. Use these resources to plan your visit to the Pony Express National Historic Trail (https://www.nps.gov/poex/planyourvisit/index.htm).
MONTANA

Montana is the fourth largest state in the United States after Alaska, Texas and California, and the largest landlocked U.S. state. When Rep. John Ashley of Ohio presented a bill to establish a temporary government in 1864 for a new territory to be carved out of Idaho, he chose Montana Territory. This time Rep. Samuel Cox, also of Ohio, objected to the name. Cox complained that the name was a misnomer given most of the territory was not mountainous and that a Native American name would be more appropriate than a Spanish one. Other names such as Shoshone were suggested, but it was decided that the Committee on Territories could name it whatever they wanted, so the original name of Montana was adopted. Most of Montana’s 100 or more named mountain ranges are in the state’s western half, most of which is geologically and geographically part of the Northern Rocky Mountains. About 60 percent of the state is prairie, part of the northern Great Plains. The major Indian Wars (1867–1877) included the famous 1876 Battle of the Little Big Horn, better known as “Custer’s Last Stand,” in which Cheyenne and Sioux defeated George A. Custer and more than 200 of his men in southeast Montana. Simultaneously with these conflicts, bison, a keystone species and the primary protein source that Native people had survived on for centuries were being destroyed. Some estimates say there were over 13 million bison in Montana in 1870. In 1875, General Philip Sheridan pleaded to a joint session of Congress to authorize the slaughtering of herds in order to deprive the Indians of their source of food. By 1884, commercial hunting had brought bison to the verge of extinction; only about 325 bison remained in the entire United States. The Homestead Act of 1862 provided free land to settlers who could claim and “prove-up” 160 acres (0.65 km2) of federal land in the midwest and western United States. The first claim by a woman was made near Warm Springs Creek by Gwenllian Evans, the daughter of Deer Lodge Montana pioneer, Morgan Evans. As World War I broke out, Jeannette Rankin of Montana, the first woman in the United States to be a member of Congress, was a pacifist and voted against the United States’ declaration of war. Approximately 1500 Montanans died as a result of the war and 2437 were wounded, also higher than any other state on a per capita basis. Montana’s Remount station in Miles City provided 10,000 cavalry horses for the war, more than any other Army post in the U.S. The war created a boom for Montana mining, lumber and farming interests as demand for war materials and food increased. An economic depression began in Montana after World War I and lasted through the Great Depression until the beginning of World War II. This caused great hardship for farmers, ranchers, and miners. The wheat farms in eastern Montana make the state a major producer; the wheat has a relatively high protein content and thus commands premium prices. In 1940, Jeannette Rankin was again elected to Congress. In 1941, as she had in 1917, she voted against the United States’ declaration of war after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Hers was the only vote against the war, and in the wake of public outcry over her vote, Rankin required police protection for a time. Montana eventually became home to the largest Intercontinental Ballistic Missile field in the U.S. covering 23,500 square miles. Montana is a relative hub of beer microbrewing, ranking third in the nation in number of craft breweries per capita in 2011. Tourist attractions include hunting, fishing, skiing, and dude ranching. Glacier National Park has 200 lakes and many streams with good trout fishing. Other major points of interest include the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, Yellowstone National Park, Fort Union Trading Post and Grant-Kohr’s Ranch National Historic Sites, and the Museum of the Plains Indians at Browning. Montana has 8 National Parks, 1 Wild & Scenic River managed by the NPS, 1 National Trail managed by the NPS, 28 National Historic Landmarks, 10 National Natural Landmarks, and 2 World Heritage Sites.

Grizzly & Wolf Discovery Center grizzlydiscoveryctr.org 800.257.2570 Email:[email protected]
Zoo Montana zoomontana.org 406.652.8100 Email:[email protected]
Glacier National Park, West Glacier, Montana https://www.nps.gov/glac/index.htm (406) 888-7800 https://www.facebook.com/GlacierNPS

As the Crown of the Continent, Glacier is the headwaters for streams that flow to the Pacific Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, and to Hudson’s Bay. What happens here affects waters in a huge section of North America. Due to a detection of invasive mussel populations in central Montana, Glacier has closed all park waters to boating until further notice. Glacier National Park is a spectacular mountain landscape that can present difficult challenges for visitors with special needs. Improvements in accessibility are being made each year. With a bit of pre-planning, all visitors can find Glacier to be a rewarding experience. Some of the “things to do” include: Hiking, Backcountry Camping, Ranger-led Programs, Guided Tours, Camping, Photography, Biking, Fishing, Cross-Country Skiing, and Special Events (which occur year round). Glacier Park has a brochure available online that highlights accessible facilities and services. If you don’t find your answers on the website, please call the park for additional information on accessibility.

Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail (ID,IL,IA,KS,MO,MT,NE,ND,OR,SD,WA) https://www.nps.gov/lecl/index.htm (402) 661-1804 (Omaha, Nebraska) https://www.facebook.com/lewisandclarknht

St. Charles, just west of St. Louis, was the starting point and the return destination of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Between May 1804 and September 1806, 31 men, one woman, and a baby traveled from the plains of the Midwest to the shores of the Pacific Ocean and back. They called themselves the Corps of Discovery. In their search for a water route to the Pacific Ocean, they opened a window into the west for the young United States. Over two hundred years later, visitors can retrace the Expedition’s path by following the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Among the more than 100 sites along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail, only five are National Park Service sites. To learn more about sites along the Trail, visit the Basic Information page under the Plan Your Visit section on the website. The Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail Headquarters Visitor Center is a handicapped accessible site. Bathrooms and most displays are accessible to those who are mobility impaired. The interpretive film is also accessible, has open caption and full audio.

Little Bighorn Battlefield, Crow Agency, Montana https://www.nps.gov/libi/index.htm (406) 638-2621 No Facebook contact on website.

This area memorializes the U.S. Army’s 7th Cavalry and the Sioux and Cheyenne in one of the Indian’s last armed efforts to preserve their way of life. Here on June 25 and 26 of 1876, 263 soldiers, including Lt. Col. George A. Custer and attached personnel of the U.S. Army, died fighting several thousand Lakota, and Cheyenne warriors. In 2011, the museum collections and archives that were stored in the basement of the existing visitor center were temporarily moved to the Western Archeological Conservation Center in Tucson Arizona. The project included relocation of museum equipment and the purchase of additional equipment (shelves, cabinets, and racks) and supplies to properly store the collection at its destination. Collections storage conditions at the park did not meet neither the NPS Museum Collections Standards nor the best practices of the American Association of Museums. Since the move, the collections have been rehoused to eliminate overcrowding and further deterioration, a Complete Conservation Survey was completed in 2013. All of the work in the direction of bringing the collection back to the park once a new visitor center and museum storage facility are constructed that meet museum standards. Besides the museum collection, there are many other activities and places of interest to see in the Park. Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument has handicap parking next to the Visitor Center as well as a ramp leading to the Visitor Center door. Handicap parking is available on the top of Last Stand Hill.

Nez Perce National Historical Park (ID, MT, OR, WA) https://www.nps.gov/nepe/index.htm (208) 843-7009 https://www.facebook.com/DiscoverNezPerceNationalHistoricalPark

Established in 1965 to tell the story of the Nez Perce (Nimiipuu) people. Spread out over four states (Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington), following the route of the 1877 conflict, this park offers something for everyone. The history and culture of the Nez Perce surrounds the park. Discover how the Nimiipuu adapted and today thrive continuing to preserve their culture. Nez Perce National Historical Park has thirty-eight sites. For 11,000 years, the NiimiiPuu have been here. Their story is the story of the American Indian in all its glory and sadness. Park Rangers staff Visitor Centers in Spalding, Idaho and Wisdom, Montana. Other sites have staff, wayside exhibits or trail guides. There are dozens of interesting sites throughout this park and accessibility varies, so we suggest that you review the Visitors Guide found under the “Plan Your Visit” section on the website to determine which sites would be most appropriate for your family to visit. The Visitor Centers at Spalding and Big Hole battlefield have accessible restroom facilities and exhibits. Trails at Canoe Camp outside of Orofino, Idaho and the Heart of Monster in Kamiah, Idaho have accessible trails.

Yellowstone National Park (ID, MT, WY), Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming https://www.nps.gov/yell/index.htm (307) 344-7381 https://www.facebook.com/YellowstoneNPS

Visit Yellowstone and experience the world’s first national park. Marvel at a volcano’s hidden power rising up in colorful hot springs, mudpots, and geysers. Explore mountains, forests, and lakes to watch wildlife and witness the drama of the natural world unfold. Discover the history that led to the conservation of our national treasures “for the benefit and enjoyment of the people.” Many of the facilities at Yellowstone National Park are more than a century old and built before the adoption of current accessibility standards; accessibility is not always ideal. The National Park Service strives to make the park as universally accessible as possible. Extra obstacles will be encountered because of the remote, wilderness nature of this special place. Facilities described as accessible do not necessarily comply fully with federal standards and some accessible facilities are not marked with the international symbol. The NPS Yellowstone National Park app includes audio-described sites and alternative text for images, combined with your device’s built-in accessibility features. This app includes up-to-date accessibility information for facilities and some trails in the park. Download it before you arrive.

NEBRASKA

Nebraska was admitted as the 37th state of the United States in 1867, and the capital was moved from Omaha to the center at Lancaster, later renamed Lincoln after the recently assassinated President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. It is the only state in the United States whose legislature is unicameral and officially nonpartisan. (Note: In government, unicameralism [Latin uni, one + camera, chamber] is the practice of having one legislative or parliamentary chamber. Thus, a unicameral parliament or unicameral legislature is a legislature which consists of one chamber or house.) The Arbor Day holiday was founded in the 1880s in Nebraska City by territorial governor J. Sterling Morton. The National Arbor Day Foundation is still headquartered in Nebraska City, with some offices in Lincoln. Since the 1960s, Native American activism in the state has increased, both through open protest, activities to build alliances with state and local governments, and in the slower, more extensive work of building tribal institutions and infrastructure. As of April 2015, the state’s unemployment rate was 2.5%, the lowest in the nation. Kool-Aid was created in 1927 by Edwin Perkins in the city of Hastings, which celebrates the event the second weekend of every August with Kool-Aid Days, and Kool-Aid is the official soft drink of Nebraska. CliffsNotes were developed by Clifton Hillegrass of Rising City. He adapted his pamphlets from the Canadian publications, Coles Notes. Bailey Yard, in North Platte, is the largest railroad classification yard in the world. The route of the original transcontinental railroad runs through the state. Nebraska has 5 National Parks, 2 Wild & Scenic Rivers managed by the NPS, 5 National Trails managed by the NPS, 20 National Historic Landmarks, and 5 National Natural Landmarks.

Lincoln Children’s Zoo lincolnzoo.org 402.475.6741 Email:[email protected]
Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium omahazoo.com 402.733-8401 Email:[email protected]
Agate Fossil Beds National Monument, Harrison, Nebraska https://www.nps.gov/agfo/index.htm (308) 436-9760 https://www.facebook.com/agatefossilbeds During the 1890s, scientists rediscovered what the Lakota Sioux already knew—bones preserved in one of the world’s most significant Miocene Epoch mammal sites. Yet, this place called “Agate” is a landscape that reflects many influences—from early animals roaming the valleys and hills, to tribal nations calling the High Plains home, to explorers passing through or settling in the American West. The mammals found at Agate Fossil Beds National Monument date from the early Miocene Epoch some 19 to 21 million years ago. Scientists describe the Miocene Epoch as the period of time from 5 to 23 million years ago. Three particular mammals were associated with the death event(s) that came to create “The Great Bonebed of Agate.” These were the Menoceras, a small rhinoceros; the large Moropus; and the fearsome Dinohyus. Another quarry site is comprised almost entirely of the once-abundant small gazelle-camel, the Stenomylus. Certain other nearby geological formations contain remains of a burrowing dry-land beaver, the Palaeocastor, and its curious spiral home, the Daemonelix. The final, less frequently found animal is the predator Daphoenodon from the beardog family. James H. Cook Collection: According to James H. Cook, who’d previously learned Indian sign as well as some of the Sioux’s spoken language, he met and spoke with Red Cloud and other Lakota leaders on behalf of a fossil collector, O.C. Marsh, a Yale University paleontologist. In addition to exposing him to fossils, this chance encounter between James and Red Cloud developed into a friendship that lasted until the latter’s death in 1909. Because of the friendship, Red Cloud and his people after 1887 traveled 150 miles by horse and wagon from the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota to visit James and his family at the Agate Springs Ranch on the Niobrara River. Once at James’s ranch, which he’d purchased in 1887, Red Cloud and his family, friends, and band erected tepees and settled into camp on the flats east of the Cooks’ home. It was during these visits, too, that the Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, and others gave gifts to James and his family, often in return for receiving beef and hides they later tanned and painted. Some of these gifts were made especially for the Cooks, including buckskin suits for James’ sons Harold and John, gloves, and the painted hide showing the Custer battle scene (the Battle of Greasy Grass). Other items—Red Cloud’s shirt, three generations of the Red Clouds’ pipe bags (one each belonging to Red Cloud, his father, and his son), and one of Crazy Horse’s whetstones—were very special to those who gave them to James. James and his descendants, who still own the ranch, concluded that these gifts should remain in the vicinity of the family home, thus they were presented to the National Park Service after James’ son Harold passed away in the 1960s. When the National Park Service constructed the current Visitor Center in the early 1990s, it included two rooms dedicated to displaying the James H. Cook Collection. For visitors with mobility impairments, there are reserved parking spaces in the parking lots located at the Visitor Center and museum as well as at the Daemonelix Trail trailhead. The picnic area adjacent to the visitor center and museum is accessible by paved and gravel trails and features wheelchair-friendly tables. The Visitor Center complex, including the museum exhibits, is wheelchair accessible. The Fossil Hills Trail, a 2.7-mile round-trip trail that begins at the Visitor Center, is a 5-foot-wide wheelchair-accessible paved trail. The Daemonelix Trail, a 1-mile loop trail, has a stabilized, crushed rock surface. The trail’s wheelchair accessible lower portion includes two Daemonelix formation exhibit cases. For visitors who want to preview the trails or see what they contain without going out-of-doors, a touch-screen-activated interactive hiker is available in the Visitor Center.
California National Historic Trail (CA, CO, ID, KS, MO, NE, NV, OR, UT, WY) https://www.nps.gov/cali/index.htm (801) 741-1012 https://www.facebook.com/oregoncalifornianps

Between 1841 and 1869, more than a quarter million people answered this call and crossed the plains and mountains to the West. These emigrants started their journeys in Kansas and Missouri, walking more than 2,000 miles for months in pursuit of a better life. The California and Oregon Trails follow the same route until Idaho, where they diverge, the Oregon Trail turning north to Oregon and the California Trail heading to California. A complete summary is set forth under the state of California, the final destination of the trail.

Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail (ID,IL,IA,KS,MO,MT,NE,ND,OR,SD,WA) https://www.nps.gov/lecl/index.htm (402) 661-1804 (Omaha, Nebraska) https://www.facebook.com/lewisandclarknht

St. Charles, just west of St. Louis, was the starting point and the return destination of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Between May 1804 and September 1806, 31 men, one woman, and a baby traveled from the plains of the Midwest to the shores of the Pacific Ocean and back. They called themselves the Corps of Discovery. In their search for a water route to the Pacific Ocean, they opened a window into the west for the young United States. Over two hundred years later, visitors can retrace the Expedition’s path by following the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Among the more than 100 sites along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail, only five are National Park Service sites. To learn more about sites along the Trail, visit the Basic Information page under the Plan Your Visit section on the website. The Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail Headquarters Visitor Center is a handicapped accessible site. Bathrooms and most displays are accessible to those who are mobility impaired. The interpretive film is also accessible, has open caption and full audio.

Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail (IA, IL, NE, UT, WY) https://www.nps.gov/mopi/index.htm (801) 741-1012 (Utah) Not available

Explore the Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail across five states to see the route 70,000 Mormons traveled from 1846 to 1869 to escape religious persecution. The Pioneer Company of 1846-1847 established the first route from Nauvoo, Illinois, to Salt Lake City, Utah, covering about 1,300 miles. We recommend contacting the nearest visitors and convention bureau to where you plan to visit for each day you are traveling along the trail or contact the individual sites or parks directly. Some sites may provide accessible trails or pathways for touring an area. National Park Service Auto Tour Route guides provide detailed information to help you plan your visit. The Trip Itineraries page on the website offers state or regional trips - come back to this page often as we amass more trip itineraries for you. Use these resources to plan your visit to the Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail. Go to Places to Go for an interactive map with trail sites and a list of sites by state (https://www.nps.gov/mopi/planyourvisit/index.htm).

Pony Express National Historic Trail (CA, CO, KS, MO, NE, NV, UT, WY) https://www.nps.gov/poex/index.htm (801) 741-1012 (NM; office of National Trails Intermountain Region) https://www.facebook.com/PonyExpressNPS

It is hard to believe that young men once rode horses to carry mail from Missouri to California in the unprecedented time of only 10 days. This relay system along the Pony Express National Historic Trail in eight states was the most direct and practical means of east-west communications before the telegraph. Trip planning along the trail can be challenging given the vast number of land jurisdictions the trail passes through. We recommend contacting the nearest visitors and convention bureau to where you plan to visit for each day you are traveling along the trail or contact the individual sites or parks directly. Our Auto Tour Route guides provide detailed information to help you plan your visit. The Trip Itineraries page offers state or regional trips - come back to this page often as we amass more trip itineraries for you. Use these resources to plan your visit to the Pony Express National Historic Trail (https://www.nps.gov/poex/planyourvisit/index.htm).

Scotts Bluff National Monument, Gering, Nebraska https://www.nps.gov/scbl/index.htm (308) 436-9700, ext. 0 https://www.facebook.com/scottsbluffnps

Towering 800 feet above the North Platte River, Scotts Bluff has served as a landmark for peoples from Native Americans to emigrants on the Oregon, California and Mormon Trails to modern travelers. Rich with geological and paleontological history as well as human history, there is much to discover while exploring the 3,000 acres of Scotts Bluff National Monument. Browsing the exhibits in the museum, watching our 12-minute video on the Oregon Trail, driving to the top of the bluff and hiking our trails are the most popular activities at Scotts Bluff. The three exhibit rooms of the Oregon Trail Museum and Visitor Center are accessible. A twelve minute, captioned video presentation shown by request and wireless hearing assistance headphones and transcripts of the program available. A wheelchair and walker are available for use in the museum and on the paved trails. The Visitor Center has museum exhibits and an introductory film. There is also a bookstore inside. Restrooms are located outside, to the east of the main building (but are not defined as handicap accessible). Two accessible parking spaces are located at the summit parking area. From the parking lot, paved trails lead to two summit overlooks. Summit Road has a South Overlook, which is approximately 300 yards from the parking lot. Access to the North Overlook is by a 16% uphill path of about 60 yards. It will take you to a level looping trail system which is about 150 yards long. Several overlooks from the summit will reveal the North Platte Valley. The remaining 100 yards contain a steep downhill grade of 19% with drop-offs on either side. The Saddle Rock Trail has a paved trail about 1.6 miles long and leads from the Visitor Center parking lot to the top of Scotts Bluff. The first 700 yards is accessible for a wheelchair as it crosses prairie grasslands to a juniper ravine near the base of the bluff. Beyond this point is not recommended for wheelchair use as the trail rises steeply for over 1700 yards with sharp drop-offs. Oregon Trail Pathway: Following the paved trail west of the museum 50 yards, you come to the eroded original Oregon Trail depressions (swales). Along the way, you pass three covered wagon replicas. From the east end of the trail depressions, the trail is unpaved for 380 yards. The paved trail then resumes. The next 106 yards is uphill with a 13% grade.

NEVADA

The tourism industry remains Nevada’s largest employer, with mining continuing as a substantial sector of the economy: Nevada is the fourth-largest producer of gold in the world. Resort areas like Las Vegas, Reno, Lake Tahoe, and Laughlin attract visitors from around the nation and world. In portions of the state outside of the Las Vegas and Reno metropolitan areas mining plays a major economic role. By value, gold is by far the most important mineral mined. Silver is a distant second. Cattle ranching is a major economic activity in rural Nevada. Nevada’s agricultural outputs are cattle, hay, alfalfa, dairy products, onions, and potatoes. Nevada’s early reputation as a “divorce haven” arose from the fact that, before the no-fault divorce revolution in the 1970s, divorces were quite difficult to obtain in the United States. Nevada boosted its profile by adopting one of the most liberal divorce statutes in the nation. Nevada has voted for the winner in every presidential election from 1912 to 2012, except in 1976 when it voted for Gerald Ford over Jimmy Carter. In 2016, Nevada lost its bellwether status when it narrowly cast its votes for Hillary Clinton, against Donald Trump, the latter of whom was the 2016 election winner. Nevada is the only U.S. state to have a “none of the above” option available on its ballots used in all elections for president and all state constitutional positions. Nevada has 4 National Parks, 1 National Heritage Area, 3 National Trails managed by the NPS, 8 National Historic Landmarks, and 6 National Natural Landmarks.

Animal Ark animalark.org 775.970.3111 Email:[email protected]
Shark Reef Aquarium sharkreef.com 702.632.4555 Email:ssh[email protected]
California National Historic Trail (CA, CO, ID, KS, MO, NE, NV, OR, UT, WY) https://www.nps.gov/cali/index.htm (801) 741-1012 https://www.facebook.com/oregoncalifornianps

Between 1841 and 1869, more than a quarter million people answered this call and crossed the plains and mountains to the West. These emigrants started their journeys in Kansas and Missouri, walking more than 2,000 miles for months in pursuit of a better life. The California and Oregon Trails follow the same route until Idaho, where they diverge, the Oregon Trail turning north to Oregon and the California Trail heading to California. A complete summary is set forth under the state of California, the final destination of the trail.

Pony Express National Historic Trail (CA, CO, KS, MO, NE, NV, UT, WY) https://www.nps.gov/poex/index.htm (801) 741-1012 (NM; office of National Trails Intermountain Region) https://www.facebook.com/PonyExpressNPS

It is hard to believe that young men once rode horses to carry mail from Missouri to California in the unprecedented time of only 10 days. This relay system along the Pony Express National Historic Trail in eight states was the most direct and practical means of east-west communications before the telegraph. Trip planning along the trail can be challenging given the vast number of land jurisdictions the trail passes through. We recommend contacting the nearest visitors and convention bureau to where you plan to visit for each day you are traveling along the trail or contact the individual sites or parks directly. Our Auto Tour Route guides provide detailed information to help you plan your visit. The Trip Itineraries page offers state or regional trips - come back to this page often as we amass more trip itineraries for you. Use these resources to plan your visit to the Pony Express National Historic Trail (https://www.nps.gov/poex/planyourvisit/index.htm).

Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Boulder City, Nevada https://www.nps.gov/lake/index.htm (702) 293-8990 https://www.facebook.com/lakemeadnps

Boat, hike, cycle, camp and fish at America’s most diverse national recreation area. With striking landscapes and brilliant blue waters, this year-round playground spreads across 1.5 million acres of mountains, canyons, valleys and two vast lakes. See the Hoover Dam from the waters of Lake Mead or Lake Mohave, or find solitude in one of the park’s nine wilderness areas. Lake Mead Visitor Center: The Alan Bible Visitor Center, built in 1966 has been brought into the 21st century while preserving its historic elements. Improvements include bringing its many systems up to code, improving accessibility throughout the building, and making it more climate friendly by conserving and producing energy. Our Visitor Center volunteers can answer all your park questions and they have a wealth of knowledge about the park, its history, and things to do.

Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument, Boulder City, Nevada https://www.nps.gov/tusk/index.htm (702) 902-0431 https://www.facebook.com/TuleSpringsNPS/

Mammoths, lions and camels once roamed along wetlands just north of what is now known as Las Vegas, Nevada. Their history is preserved at Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument and is ready to be discovered. Because this is a new park, there are no designated trails or facilities; however, there is plenty to explore. Paleontologists have discovered many fossils at Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument. Some date back as far as 200,000 years ago. Extinct large mammals include the North American lion, Columbian mammoth, horses, bison and camels. Smaller rodents, such as squirrels, marmots, voles and gophers have been found, along with birds like the extinct teratorn, hawks, ducks and owls. Tortoises, lizards, snakes, frogs and bony fish have also been found in the monument. It’s important to remember that all park resources - fossils, plants, animals, artifacts and rocks - are to remain as you find them, so that other visitors can experience the same sense of discovery. It is illegal to possess, destroy, injure, deface, remove, dig or disturb any natural cultural or archeological resources from a unit of the National Park Service. Photographing Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument should be on your bucket list. Here, you can capture images of beautiful desert sunsets, critically endangered flowers and fossils from animals that roamed the area up to 200,000 years ago. Because this is a new park, there is no “Accessibility” information available. The park is mainly open to hikers over rough uneven terrain. It also is now a desert area, with temperatures often above 100 F. in May to September. Therefore, we do not recommend hiking during these months. Keep an eye on the weather. Tule Springs is located along the Upper Las Vegas Wash. If rain is in the forecast, seek high ground. Flash flooding through washes can occur rapidly, even if it’s not raining where you are. (Note: We strongly recommend that potential visitors contact Lake Mead Park Service staff to discern whether your family (including a member in a wheelchair) could enjoy a visit to the park.)

NEW HAMPSHIRE

In January 1776, it became the first of the British North American colonies to establish a government independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain’s authority, and it was the first to establish its own state constitution. Six months later, it became one of the original 13 states that founded the United States of America. New Hampshire has the shortest ocean coastline of any U.S. coastal state, with a length of 18 miles, sometimes measured as only 13 miles. The White Mountains range in New Hampshire spans the north-central portion of the state, with Mount Washington the tallest in the northeastern U.S. – site of the second-highest wind speed ever recorded. The climate on the upper reaches of Mount Washington has inspired the weather observatory on the peak to claim that the area has the “World’s Worst Weather,” including a world-record wind speed of 231 miles an hour (a record held from 1934 to 2010). New Hampshire is the state with the highest percentage of timberland area in the country. The Barnstormers Theatre in Tamworth, New Hampshire, founded in 1931, is one of the longest-running professional summer theaters in the United States. Funspot, the world’s largest video arcade (now termed a museum), is located in Laconia. New Hampshire has 2 National Parks, 1 National Heritage Area, 1 Wild & Scenic River managed by the NPS, and 2 National Trails managed by the NPS.

Explore the Ocean World with Oceanarium and school programs (in winter) exploretheoceanworld.com 603.758.7998 Email:[email protected]
Charmingfare Farm visitthefarm.com 603.483.5623 Email:[email protected]
Appalachian National Scenic Trail (CT, GA, MA, MD, ME, NC, NH, NJ, NY, PA, TN VA, VT, WV) https://www.nps.gov/appa/index.htm (304) 535-6278 (Harpers Ferry, WV) No Facebook connection found on home page.

Conceived in 1921, built by private citizens, and completed in 1937, today the Appalachian Trail is managed by the National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, numerous state agencies and thousands of volunteers. The Appalachian Trail is a 2,180+ mile long public footpath that traverses the scenic, wooded, pastoral, wild, and culturally resonant lands of the Appalachian Mountains from Georgia to Maine. The Appalachian National Scenic Trail does not currently have a visitor center. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy, a national not-for-profit corporation has a visitor center in Harpers Ferry, WV. The Appalachian Trail has been enjoyed by visitors with a variety of disabilities - including the blind, hearing-impaired, and hikers with a range of mobility limitations. The trail is not highly developed though, and there are only a few sections that are considered fully accessible.

Mount Washington State Park, Sargent’s Purchase, New Hampshire http://www.nhstateparks.org/visit/state-parks/mount-washington-state-par... (603) 466-3347 https://www.facebook.com/NewHampshireStateParks

Mount Washington is the highest peak in the eastern United States. The summit and observatory can be reached on foot, and by car and cog-train, with the road to the top usually open from mid-May to mid-October, weather permitting. A number of trails, including the Appalachian Trail, run up and around Mount Washington, with backcountry huts available for overnight stays. Modelled after similar shelters in the Alps, the largest of the eight huts can host up to 90 people. Bunk reservations are recommended; most huts include dinner and breakfast in the price.

This editor chatted with Chris at the park and he provided the following information. There is wheelchair access to the Sherman Adams building, a modern summit building, which houses The Sherman Adams Visitor Center, a cafeteria, restrooms, gift shops, the Mount Washington Observatory and its museum. The historic Tip-Top House is located adjacent to the summit building and is also wheelchair accessible. Access to the park is available via (1) the Mount Washington Auto Road and (2) the Cog Railroad. The train staff will assist individuals with disabilities and the park rangers will assist with entrance to the Sherman Adams building. The museum has steps, but it also has an elevator for wheelchair use. Chris said the New Hampshire Park Department is working to provide better access for persons with disabilities, but he noted that the mountainous terrain and the high winds (up to 100 miles per hour at times) prevent some types of improvements. Overall, he thought that a visit to Mount Washington State Park would be enjoyed by all family members.

Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site, Cornish, New Hampshire https://www.nps.gov/saga/index.htm (603) 675-2175 https://www.facebook.com/SaintGaudensNPS

Discover the home, studios and gardens of Augustus Saint-Gaudens, one of America’s greatest sculptors. See over 100 of his artworks in the galleries and on the grounds, from heroic public monuments to expressive portrait reliefs, and the gold coins which changed the look of American coinage. Enjoy summer concerts, explore nature trails, or indulge your hidden talents during a sculpture class. The park visitor center is fully accessible and parking for the disabled is located nearby. Certain buildings and areas of the park are, unfortunately, not wheelchair accessible. These include Aspet (the artist’s home), the Ravine Studio, the Formal Gardens, the Picture Gallery and the Nature Trails. See the online Accessibility map of the Park’s historic core with suggested wheelchair routes, barriers and non-wheelchair accessible structures and areas. Upon request, the mobility impaired may be permitted to drive closer to the New Gallery, Ravine Studio and Little Studio, to allow for easier access. Parking for visitors with disabilities is available near the Visitor Center. The ranger in the entrance kiosk can direct you to the location. Visitors are also welcome to drive to the Visitor Center to drop off individuals with mobility problems. Pathways around the park are found in a variety of surfaces; grass, brick, asphalt, bark mulch, cement and gravel. Because of the historic nature of the site, some of the pathways may be uneven, and visitors should always take care when walking around the park. Please call the park if you have any questions about accessibility. If possible, take advantage of a guided tour. An orientation film will introduce you to the life and artwork of Augustus Saint-Gaudens. The park, with the exception of “Aspet,” may also be toured on your own, as all artwork has interpretive labels.

NEW JERSEY

The New Jersey Constitution of 1776 was passed July 2, 1776, just two days before the Second Continental Congress declared American Independence from Great Britain. During the American Revolutionary War, British and American armies crossed New Jersey numerous times, and several pivotal battles took place in the state. Because of this, New Jersey today is often referred to as “The Crossroads of the American Revolution.” The winter quarters of the Continental Army were established there twice by General George Washington in Morristown, which has been called “The Military Capital of the American Revolution.” On the night of December 25–26, 1776, the Continental Army under George Washington crossed the Delaware River. Washington made a surprise attack on Princeton and successfully defeated the British forces there on January 3, 1777. Emanuel Leutze’s painting of Washington Crossing the Delaware became an icon of the Revolution. Inventor Thomas Edison also became an important figure of the Industrial Revolution, having been granted 1,093 patents, many of which for inventions he developed while working in New Jersey. Edison’s facilities, first at Menlo Park and then in West Orange, are considered perhaps the first research centers in the United States. Christie Street in Menlo Park was the first thoroughfare in the world to have electric lighting. The first Miss America Pageant was held in 1921 in Atlantic City; the Holland Tunnel connecting Jersey City to Manhattan opened in 1927; the first drive-in movie was shown in 1933 in Camden; and in 1937, the zeppelin airship Hindenburg crashed in flames over Lakehurst. Shipping is a strong industry in New Jersey because of the state’s strategic geographic location, the Port of New York and New Jersey being the busiest port on the East Coast. The Port Newark-Elizabeth Marine Terminal was the world’s first container port and is one of the world’s largest container ports. Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey, was ranked the top U.S. national university per the 2017 list of U.S. News & World Report. In 2013, Rutgers University gained medical and dental schools intended to augment its profile as a national research university. In 2014, New Jersey’s school systems were ranked at the top of all fifty U.S. states by financial website Wallethub.com. Nine New Jersey high schools were ranked among the top 25 in the U.S. on the Newsweek “America’s Top High Schools 2016” list, more than from any other state. New Jersey has 9 National Parks, 1 National Heritage Area, 5 Wild & Scenic Rivers managed by the NPS, and 2 National Trails managed by the NPS.

Adventure Aquarium adventureaquarium.com 856.365.3300 Email:[email protected]
Turtle Back Zoo turtlebackzoo.com 973-731-5800 Email:[email protected]
Appalachian National Scenic Trail (CT, GA, MA, MD, ME, NC, NH, NJ, NY, PA, TN VA, VT, WV) https://www.nps.gov/appa/index.htm (304) 535-6278 (Harpers Ferry, WV) No Facebook connection found on home page.

Conceived in 1921, built by private citizens, and completed in 1937, today the Appalachian Trail is managed by the National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, numerous state agencies and thousands of volunteers. The Appalachian Trail is a 2,180+ mile long public footpath that traverses the scenic, wooded, pastoral, wild, and culturally resonant lands of the Appalachian Mountains from Georgia to Maine. The Appalachian National Scenic Trail does not currently have a visitor center. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy, a national not-for-profit corporation has a visitor center in Harpers Ferry, WV. The Appalachian Trail has been enjoyed by visitors with a variety of disabilities - including the blind, hearing-impaired, and hikers with a range of mobility limitations. The trail is not highly developed though, and there are only a few sections that are considered fully accessible.

Ellis Island, Part of Statue of Liberty National Monument (NJ, NY) https://www.nps.gov/elis/index.htm (212) 363-3200 https://www.facebook.com/statuelibrtynps

How far would you travel to find a better life? What if the journey took weeks under difficult conditions? If you answered “Whatever it takes,” you echo the feelings of the 12 million immigrants who passed through these now quiet halls from 1892 to 1954. Ellis Island afforded them the opportunity to attain the American dream for themselves and their descendants. Ellis Island National Museum of Immigration is located on Ellis Island in New York Harbor and is only accessible by private ferry. There is no entrance fee. However, both islands are only accessible via ferry company Statue Cruises. We highly recommend that you book your tickets online in advance. All visitors are required to pass through a security screening before boarding any ferry. The security screening spaces are accessible. Statue Cruises personnel provide assistance on the ferry gangways. Ferries have enclosed cabins on the main deck and outdoor spaces near the rear or above the main deck. Any deck above the main requires the use of stairs. Priority seating is available near the entrance of the enclosed main deck cabin. Restrooms aboard ferries are not handicapped accessible. All levels of the museum are fully accessible to wheelchairs via elevators and ramped pathways. An elevator is located on the west side of the museum building. For information about programs, services, activities and requests regarding accommodations for persons with disabilities: please contact the park in writing, or by email (see website for form), at least twenty one (21) days in advance of your intended visit.

New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve, New Lisbon, New Jersey https://www.nps.gov/pine/index.htm (215) 597-1581 No Facebook contact found on website.

This is truly a special place. It’s classified as a United States Biosphere Reserve and in 1978 was established by Congress as the country’s first National Reserve. It includes portions of seven southern New Jersey counties, and encompasses over one-million acres of farms, forests and wetlands. It contains 56 communities, from hamlets to suburbs, with over 700,000 permanent residents. The reserve occupies 22% of New Jersey’s land area, and it is the largest body of open space on the Mid-Atlantic seaboard between Richmond and Boston. The following guide (http://www.nj.gov/pinelands/home/visit/recreational/index.shtml) contains links to websites of places to visit and facilities located in and around the Pinelands. These locations and organizations offer numerous recreational opportunities, including canoeing, camping, hiking, access to historic sites, wildlife viewing, and educational experiences https://www.nps.gov/pine/planyourvisit/things2do.htm.

General topics include: State Parks and Forests, Wildlife Refuges and Wildlife Management Areas, County Parks, Educational Facilities and Non-Profit Organizations; Historic Sites; and Trails for Hiking, Biking and Driving. A Pinelands Guide to Recreational Opportunities, Historic Sites, Nature Centers, and Field Trips in the New Jersey Pinelands is available on-line at the NJ Pinelands Commission web site: http://www.nj.gov/pinelands/pastimes/guide/. There is no general accessibility information available so families interested in visiting the New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve will have to do their own homework and research pursuant to their family’s interests and destination.

Statue of Liberty National Monument, Liberty Island (NJ, NY) https://www.nps.gov/stli/index.htm (212) 363-3200 (Park Information) https://www.facebook.com/statuelibrtynps/

“The Statue of Liberty Enlightening the World” was a gift of friendship from the people of France to the United States and is recognized as a universal symbol of freedom and democracy. The Statue of Liberty was dedicated on October 28, 1886. It was designated as a National Monument in 1924. Employees of the National Park Service have been caring for the colossal copper statue since 1933. Visiting Liberty Island is one of the most rewarding experiences of any trip to New York City. However, visitors who wish to enter the museum, pedestal, or crown must secure reservations. For over a decade, the National Park Service has implemented a reservation system. The National Park Service strongly recommends making advanced ticket reservations. Reservations secured far enough in advance allow visitors to select their desired level of access, and also eliminates the need to wait in line to purchase tickets. Crown tickets are available by advanced reservation only.

Visitors taking mass transportation to the ferry departure point should consult the proper agency regarding accessibility. For directions and transportation options, please reference the Plan Your Visit section on the website. The information center, gift pavilion, bookstore, dining facilities and exterior grounds are wheelchair accessible. For those with reservations to enter the monument, wheelchair access is provided by several elevators to the museum, the exterior of Fort Wood, and to the top of the pedestal. The outdoor observation deck balcony is not wheelchair accessible, but visitors still have access to the New York City skyline view. For information about programs, services, activities and requests regarding accommodations for persons with disabilities, please contact the park in writing or by email (see website for email access) at least twenty one (21) days in advance of your intended visit. The park telephone number is set forth above. All ferry tickets include access to Liberty Island, Ellis Island and the Immigration Museum. The museum is open to the public. For current information, check the alert at the top of the Ellis Island website. To visit both islands in one day, the National Park Service recommends an early ferry departure.

Thomas Edison National Historical Park, West Orange, New Jersey https://www.nps.gov/edis/index.htm (973) 736-0550, ext. 11 https://www.facebook.com/ThomasEdisonNHP/

Thomas Edison’s home and laboratory are a step back in time, when machines were run by belts and pulleys and music was played on phonographs. Discover where America’s greatest inventor changed our world forever. If you wanted to work as an executive for Thomas A. Edison, Incorporated in the early 1920s, you had to pass a test. Edison himself chose the questions, which ranged from geography to astronomy to economics to fiction to history. The inventor believed that an intelligent, well educated person should know most of the answers. After all, he knew them and he had never been to college. In fact, he had mostly been home schooled by his mother! Come visit the Laboratory Complex. Explore 20,000 square feet of additional exhibit space, including two floors of the main laboratory building which were previously closed to the public. Spend an hour or spend the day. The Laboratory is now a self-guided experience so you can pick and choose what’s interesting to you. Ranger-led programs run at the Laboratory Complex daily. Spend an afternoon exploring Glenmont, the estate of Thomas and Mina Edison. Thomas Edison purchased this grand estate for his new bride, Mina Miller Edison, in 1886. It is here that the Edisons raised their children and entertained friends, family, and Edison business associates.

Thomas Edison National Historical Park welcomes all visitors and strives to ensure that its exhibits, programs, and facilities are accessible to everyone. Accessible restrooms and drinking fountains are located in Building 1 Visitor Center. Entrances are wheelchair accessible with ramps. Assistance may be needed in some historic buildings. The Black Maria at the Laboratory Complex and the Glenmont home are not accessible. When Glenmont, Edison’s home, is open, visitors must first stop at the visitor center at the Laboratory Complex (211 Main Street) to get a vehicle pass. Glenmont is not accessible to wheelchairs. A ticketed tour is the only way to enter the house. Tickets for a house tour are limited and distributed on a first-come first-served basis from the Laboratory Visitor Center. Glenmont is generally open Friday, Saturday, and Sunday EXCEPT the home is closed in the winter from January through mid-March. If you need special assistance, please contact the park at least two weeks in advance by calling (973) 736-0550.

Washington-Rochambeau National Historic Trail (CT, DC, DE, MA, MD, NJ, NY, PA, RI, VA) https://www.nps.gov/waro/index.htm (215) 597-1581 https://www.facebook.com/Washington-Rochambeau-Revolutionary-Route-Natio...

In 1781, General Rochambeau’s French Army joined forces with General Washington’s Continental Army to fight the British Army in Yorktown, Virginia. With the French Navy in support, the allied armies moved hundreds of miles to become the largest troop movement of the American Revolution. The effort and cooperation between the two sides led to a victory at Yorktown and secured American independence. Rochambeau’s march north from July 1782 provided Americans an opportunity to give thanks to their country’s ally, for when the French infantry sailed out of Boston Harbor on Christmas Day 1782, King George III and Parliament had acknowledged the United States “to be free Sovereign and independent States.”

The Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historical Trail is over 680 miles of land and water trails that pass through nine states along the eastern coast of the United States. The trail’s large geographic presence serves to connect major metropolitan areas, national and state parks, historic and scenic trails, and countless other historic sites. Visitors can follow the route by exploring these different sites along the trail. Use the links on the website that listing each state to find sites that interpret the trail according to state. More information can also be found through our partner organization, the National Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Association, Inc. at W3R-US.org.

NEW MEXICO

Inhabited by Native Americans for thousands of years before European exploration, New Mexico was colonized by the Spanish in 1598. Later, it was part of independent Mexico before becoming a U.S. territory and eventually a U.S. state in 1912 as a result of the Mexican-American War. New Mexico, or Nuevo México in Spanish, is often incorrectly believed to have taken its name from the nation of Mexico. However, Spanish explorers recorded this region as New Mexico in 1563, and again in 1581, when they incorrectly believed it contained wealthy Mexica Indian cultures similar to those of the Aztec Empire. The name simply stuck, even though the area had no connection to Mexico or the Mexica Indian tribes. The New Mexican landscape ranges from wide, rose-colored deserts to broken mesa to high, snow-capped peaks. During World War II, the first atomic bombs were designed and manufactured at Los Alamos, a site developed by the federal government specifically to support a high-intensity scientific effort to rapidly complete research and testing of this weapon. The first bomb was tested at Trinity site in the desert on what is now the White Sands Missile Range. It is home to three Air Force bases (Kirtland Air Force Base, Holloman Air Force Base, and Cannon Air Force Base; a testing range (White Sands Missile Range); an army proving ground and maneuver range (Fort Bliss – McGregor Range); and the federal research laboratories Los Alamos National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories. New Mexico is the third leading crude oil and natural gas producer in the United States. All with termini in Northern New Mexico, the Camino Real, the Santa Fe Trail and the Old Spanish Trail are all recognized as National Historic Trails. The first operational railroad, the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway (ATSF), entered the territory by way of the lucrative and contested Raton Pass in 1878. It eventually reached El Paso, Texas, in 1881 and with the Southern Pacific Railroad created the nation’s second transcontinental railroad with a junction at Deming. The Albuquerque International Sunport is the state’s primary port of entry for air transportation. Upham, near Truth or Consequences, is the location of the world’s first operational and purpose-built commercial spaceport, Spaceport America. Rocket launches began in April 2007. It is undeveloped and has one tenant, UP Aerospace, launching small payloads. Virgin Galactic, a space tourism company, plans to make this their primary operating base. New Mexico’s strong Spanish, Native American, and Wild West frontier motifs have provided material for many authors in the state including internationally recognized Rudolfo Anaya and Tony Hillerman. New Mexico has 15 National Parks, 1 National Heritage Area, 3 National Trails managed by the NPS, 46 National Historic Landmarks, 12 National Natural Landmarks, and 3 World Heritage Sites.

Albuquerque Biological Park Zoo cabq.gov/culturalservices/biopark 505.768.2000 Email:[email protected] [email protected]
ABQ Bio Park Aquarium cabq.gov/culturalservices/biopark/aquarium 505.768.2000 Email:[email protected] [email protected]
Aztec Ruins National Monument, Pueblo, New Mexico https://www.nps.gov/azru/index.htm (505) 334-6174, ext. 0 https://www.facebook.com/AztecRuinsNM

Pueblo people describe this site as part of their migration journey. Today you can follow their ancient passageways to a distant time. Explore a 900-year old ancestral Pueblo Great House of over 400 masonry rooms. Look up and see original timbers holding up the roof. Search for the fingerprints of ancient workers in the mortar. Listen for an echo of ritual drums in the reconstructed Great Kiva (ceremonial structure). The self-guided visitor trail though Aztec Ruins winds through an ancestral Pueblo great house that was once the center of a large regional community. The half-mile trail will take you through a reconstructed great kiva, or ceremonial structure, and through original rooms with timber roofs still intact. Please stay on the trail for your own safety and to help protect these fragile resources. There’s even more to see and do at Aztec Ruins, including museum exhibits with artifacts, a 15-minute video, a segment of the Old Spanish National Historic Trail that leads to the Animas River, and a Heritage Garden. The visitor center, restrooms, picnic tables, and much of the trail are wheelchair accessible. The antechamber looking down into the Great Kiva accommodates most wheelchairs 29” wide or less.

Carlsbad Caverns National Park, Carlsbad, New Mexico https://www.nps.gov/cave/index.htm (575) 785-2232 https://www.facebook.com/Caverns/

High ancient sea ledges, deep rocky canyons, flowering cactus and desert wildlife - treasures above the ground in the Chihuahuan Desert. Hidden beneath the surface are more than 119 known caves - all formed when sulfuric acid dissolved the surrounding limestone leaving behind caverns of all sizes. Carlsbad Caverns is a national park that can be enjoyed by everyone. We hope you will enjoy the self-guided tour through the cavern. To add to your enjoyment, we offer accessible parking, picnicking, dining, and visitor center services. For entrance into the cavern, the Natural Entrance trail is not ADA compliant due to its steep grade (15% - 20%) and therefore not accessible with wheelchairs. We do offer elevator service that can take visitors into and out of the Big Room where you can access the self-guided trail.

The self-guided Big Room route is the only wheelchair accessible route in the caverns. You will find this 1-mile trail after you descend 750 feet into the underground rest area. Please note the trail is wet from dripping water and can be slippery, bumpy, uneven and difficult to navigate. It is not ADA approved and should only be attempted with assistance. Maps defining the wheelchair accessible areas can be obtained in the Visitor Center. Ranger-led tours are not accessible with wheelchairs, walkers, scooters or canes due to difficult and rugged trail conditions. Accessible parking is marked with blue reserved signs. The Visitor Center, theater, gift shop, bookstore, restrooms and restaurant can be accessed via ramps from the parking lot. You may enter the Visitor Center via automatic doors in the front. Accessible picnic tables near the Visitor Center are located at the far end of the east parking lot as well as west and north of the restaurant. At the Rattlesnake Springs Picnic Area, there are accessible restrooms and one accessible picnic table. The free “Bat Flight Program” (May-October) - an evening talk where a ranger presents information about bats prior to their flight. No reservations are required for this program that happens every evening from Memorial Day through October at the outdoor amphitheater (near the mouth of the cave). Spaces to accommodate wheelchairs are located at the entrance to the amphitheater. Restrooms are available and fully accessible. Be sure to review the Things to Know Before You Go (https://www.nps.gov/cave/planyourvisit/things2know.htm) when planning a trip to see the Carlsbad Caverns.

Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument, Silver City, New Mexico https://www.nps.gov/gicl/index.htm (575) 536-9461 https://www.facebook.com/Gila-Cliff-Dwellings-National-Monument-15318466...

For thousands of years, groups of nomadic people used the caves of the Gila River as temporary shelter. In the late 1200’s, people of the Mogollon Culture decided it would be a good place to call home. They built rooms, crafted pottery, and raised children in the cliff dwellings for about twenty years. Then the Mogollon moved on, leaving the walls for us as a glimpse into the past.

Due to the roughness and elevation gains of the one mile trail to the Cliff Dwellings, this trail is not wheelchair accessible. The trail to the Cliff Dwellings is not paved and both the final section ascending to the Dwellings and the trail descending from them are very steep. The Dwellings are entered via a short staircase and may be exited, if desired, via a wooden ladder. Part of the “Trail to the Past” at the nearby Lower Scorpion Campground is wheelchair accessible (for viewing of pictographs). The Gila Visitor Center and the trailhead Contact Station are wheelchair accessible. An interactive CD is available at the Gila Visitor Center.

Manhattan Project National Historical Park (NM, TN, WA) https://www.nps.gov/mapr/index.htm (505) 661-6277 -- This phone number is for the Los Alamos Unit Visitor Center. You may also contact the Oak Ridge Unit Visitor Center at (865) 576-6767 or the Hanford Unit Visitor Center at (509) 376-1647 https://www.facebook.com/ManhattanProjectNPS/

This site tells the story about the people, events, science, and engineering that led to the creation of the atomic bomb, which helped end World War II. The (1) Los Alamos, New Mexico, (2) Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and (3) Hanford, Washington sites combined make up the Manhattan Project.

The National Park Service and the Department of Energy are working together to safely expand access to the facilities included in the park. Many of the facilities are industrial in nature and Department of Energy is working to improve accessibility to the sites open to the public. Virtualization efforts are underway at all three sites. Please call the site ahead of your visit to discuss accessible programs, services, and activities at the individual sites and request accommodations.

Petroglyph National Monument, Albuquerque, New Mexico https://www.nps.gov/petr/index.htm (505) 899-0205, ext. 335 https://www.facebook.com/Petroglyph-National-Monument-147007951983967/

Petroglyph National Monument protects one of the largest petroglyph sites in North America, featuring designs and symbols carved onto volcanic rocks by Native Americans and Spanish settlers 400 to 700 years ago. These images are a valuable record of cultural expression and hold profound spiritual significance for contemporary Native Americans and for the descendants of the early Spanish settlers.

Las Imágenes Visitor Center –The Visitor Center is fully accessible with parking spaces and chair ramps. Monument staff members are on duty to provide you with personalized information and to assist you in planning your visit. This site also has a tactile exhibit of petroglyphs so all visitors can experience the feel of a petroglyph. (Touching of actual petroglyphs is strongly discouraged to prevent damage to these irreplaceable resources.)

Boca Negra Canyon - Trails are not accessible; however, petroglyphs may be easily seen using the view scope located at the Macaw trail shaded patio. Accessible parking lots, patio, and restrooms. Rinconada Canyon - The Rinconada Canyon Trail is not accessible at this time. Accessible parking lot, vault restroom, picnic tables, and shade structures. Volcanoes - This recently developed area has a trail that is partially prepared for wheelchair access. Funds are being appropriated to complete accessibility of this trail to its full 1 mile length. Accessible parking lot, vault restrooms, and shade structure.

NEW YORK

The City of New York, often called New York City or simply New York, is the most populous city in the United States. New York City consists of five boroughs, each of which is a separate county of New York State. The five boroughs – Brooklyn, Queens, Manhattan, The Bronx, and Staten Island – were consolidated into a single city in 1898. The city is home to the world’s two largest stock exchanges by total market capitalization, the New York Stock Exchange and NASDAQ. In 1911, the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, the city’s worst industrial disaster, took the lives of 146 garment workers and spurred the growth of the International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union and major improvements in factory safety standards. The city and surrounding area suffered the bulk of the economic damage and largest loss of human life in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001, attacks when 10 of the 19 terrorists associated with Al-Qaeda piloted American Airlines Flight 11 into the North Tower of the World Trade Center and United Airlines Flight 175 into the South Tower of the World Trade Center, and later destroyed them, killing 2,192 civilians, 343 firefighters, and 71 law enforcement officers who were in the towers and in the surrounding area. Manhattan (New York County) is the geographically smallest and most densely populated borough and is home to Central Park and most of the city’s skyscrapers. Brooklyn (Kings County) is the city’s most populous borough. Brooklyn is known for its cultural, social, and ethnic diversity, an independent art scene, distinct neighborhoods, and a distinctive architectural heritage. Queens (Queens County) is geographically the largest borough, the most ethnically diverse county in the United States, and the most ethnically diverse urban area in the world. Queens is the site of Citi Field, the baseball stadium of the New York Mets, and hosts the annual U.S. Open tennis tournament at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park. Additionally, two of the three busiest airports serving the New York metropolitan area, John F. Kennedy International Airport and LaGuardia Airport, are located in Queens. Staten Island (Richmond County) is the most suburban in character of the five boroughs. The free Staten Island Ferry, a daily commuter ferry, provides unobstructed views of the Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island, and Lower Manhattan. The Bronx (Bronx County) is New York City’s is the only New York City borough with a majority of it a part of the mainland United States. It is the location of Yankee Stadium, the baseball park of the New York Yankees, and home to the largest cooperatively owned housing complex in the United States. It is also home to the Bronx Zoo, the world’s largest metropolitan zoo. The New York Public Library, which has the largest collection of any public library system in the United States, serves Manhattan, the Bronx, and Staten Island. Queens is served by the Queens Borough Public Library, the nation’s second largest public library system, while the Brooklyn Public Library serves Brooklyn. New York City is home to the headquarters of the National Football League, Major League Baseball, the National Basketball Association, the National Hockey League, and Major League Soccer. The New York Marathon is one of the world’s largest. The iconic New York City Subway system is the largest rapid transit system in the world when measured by stations in operation, with 472, and by length of routes. Grand Central Terminal, also referred to as “Grand Central Station,” is the world’s largest railway station by number of train platforms. New York has 25 National Parks, 4 National Heritage Areas, 1 Wild & Scenic River managed by the NPS, and 3 National Trails managed by the NPS.

Bronx Zoo (The Wildlife Conservation Society) bronxzoo.com 718.220.5100 Email:[email protected]
Appalachian National Scenic Trail (CT, GA, MA, MD, ME, NC, NH, NJ, NY, PA, TN VA, VT, WV) https://www.nps.gov/appa/index.htm (304) 535-6278 (Harpers Ferry, WV) No Facebook connection found on home page.

Conceived in 1921, built by private citizens, and completed in 1937, today the Appalachian Trail is managed by the National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, numerous state agencies and thousands of volunteers. The Appalachian Trail is a 2,180+ mile long public footpath that traverses the scenic, wooded, pastoral, wild, and culturally resonant lands of the Appalachian Mountains from Georgia to Maine. The Appalachian National Scenic Trail does not currently have a visitor center. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy, a national not-for-profit corporation has a visitor center in Harpers Ferry, WV. The Appalachian Trail has been enjoyed by visitors with a variety of disabilities - including the blind, hearing-impaired, and hikers with a range of mobility limitations. The trail is not highly developed though, and there are only a few sections that are considered fully accessible.

Ellis Island, Part of Statue of Liberty National Monument (NJ, NY) https://www.nps.gov/elis/index.htm (212) 363-3200 https://www.facebook.com/statuelibrtynps How far would you travel to find a better life? What if the journey took weeks under difficult conditions? If you answered “Whatever it takes,” you echo the feelings of the 12 million immigrants who passed through these now quiet halls from 1892 to 1954. Ellis Island afforded them the opportunity to attain the American dream for themselves and their descendants. Ellis Island National Museum of Immigration is located on Ellis Island in New York Harbor and is only accessible by private ferry. There is no entrance fee. However, both islands are only accessible via ferry company Statue Cruises. We highly recommend that you book your tickets online in advance. All visitors are required to pass through a security screening before boarding any ferry. The security screening spaces are accessible. Statue Cruises personnel provide assistance on the ferry gangways. Ferries have enclosed cabins on the main deck and outdoor spaces near the rear or above the main deck. Any deck above the main requires the use of stairs. Priority seating is available near the entrance of the enclosed main deck cabin. Restrooms aboard ferries are not handicapped accessible. All levels of the museum are fully accessible to wheelchairs via elevators and ramped pathways. An elevator is located on the west side of the museum building. For information about programs, services, activities and requests regarding accommodations for persons with disabilities: please contact the park in writing, or by email (see website for form), at least twenty one (21) days in advance of your intended visit.
Gateway National Recreation Area (NJ, NY) https://www.nps.gov/gate/index.htm (718) 354-4606 U.S. Park Police- 24 hour dispatch for Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island (718) 338-3988; Sandy Hook Law Enforcement - 24 hour dispatch for Sandy Hook, NJ (732) 872-5900 https://www.facebook.com/GatewayNPS There are three geographic units: Sandy Hook, New Jersey; Jamaica Bay and Staten Island, New York City. The New York City units include Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, Fort Tilden, Riis Park in Queens, Floyd Bennett Field and Canarsie Pier in Brooklyn. Staten Island has Great Kills Park, Miller Field and Fort Wadsworth. These sites and others make up the 27,000 acres of Gateway, one national park. Sandy Hook Accessibility: Beach wheelchairs are available. Contact the Visitor Center at (732) 872-5970. Restrooms at all six beach centers, are wheelchair accessible. These are at Beach Area B, C, D, E, Gunnison and North Beaches. Restroom at Guardian Park in Fort Hancock is accessible. All six beach concessions are accessible, including the Seagulls Nest Restaurant at Beach Area D. The North Beach Observation Deck, with its views of the New York skyline, is accessible. The five-mile long Multi-Use Pathway is wheelchair accessible. The Sandy Hook Lighthouse Keepers’ Quarters and Barn (film) is wheelchair accessible. The Sandy Hook Visitor Center is accessible, except for the restrooms. All parking lots have handicapped spaces. Jamaica Bay Accessibility: The Rockaway Gateway Greenway Multi-Use Path is wheelchair accessible. Breezy Point District: Wheelchair accessible restrooms are available at Fort Tilden from April through October. Fort Tilden Studio 6 and Studio 7 (Rockaway Artist Alliance) are wheelchair accessible. Fort Tilden post Theater – T4 (Rockaway Theater Company) is wheelchair accessible. Fort Tilden Back Fort paved trails are wheelchair accessible. The Jacob Riis Park Boardwalk is wheelchair accessible. Handicapped parking is available at Fort Tilden and Jacob Riis Park. Beach wheelchairs are available at the Jacob Riis Park First Aid Station from Memorial Day through Labor Day. North Shore District: Floyd Bennett Field: The Ryan Visitor Center is wheelchair accessible. The Gateway Center for Science and Environmental Studies (Building 272, 1st Floor) is wheelchair accessible. Hanger B (Historic Aircraft Restoration Programs) is wheelchair accessible. Ecology Village Education Building (Bldg. 70) is wheelchair accessible. The Ecology Village Campground has wheelchair accessible campsites and wheelchair accessible portable toilets from April through November. The Cartop Boat Ramp near Hangar B is wheelchair accessible. Outside Hangar B, vaulted toilets are wheelchair accessible. The Floyd Bennett Field Community Gardens and nearby portable toilet are wheelchair accessible. Canarsie Pier restrooms are wheelchair accessible and handicapped parking is available. Plumb Beach is wheelchair accessible and handicapped parking is available. The following North Shore District park concessions have wheelchair accessible facilities: Brooklyn Golf, Jamaica Bay Riding Academy, Gateway Marina, and Aviator Sports. Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge has handicapped parking available. Staten Island Accessibility: Great Kills Park: The Multi-use Path, from the Hylan Boulevard entrance to the Beach Center parking lot is wheelchair accessible. The Ranger Station is wheelchair accessible. The Beach Center Restrooms are accessible. Surf Chairs are available for persons in wheelchairs. Life Guards are available to assist visitors during the summer. The Education Field Station, open during education or public programs only, is wheelchair accessible. All Parking Lots have designated handicapped parking spaces. In Lot F, there are cutouts in the railing along the water to allow for fishing from wheelchairs. Nichols Marina Office - Wheelchair accessible. Fort Wadsworth: In historic Fort Tompkins, the parade ground, restrooms and some historic rooms are wheelchair accessible. The Counterscarp Gallery is gravel and has one small step. In historic Battery Weed, the parade ground only is accessible. The Overlook in front of Fort Tompkins is wheelchair accessible. Gateway Headquarters, Building 210 is accessible. Miller Field: All public restrooms are wheelchair accessible. The following Parking Lots have designated handicapped spaces: Sanchez Drive, Red Brick Building, High School, Overflow Lot.
Niagara Falls National Heritage Area, Niagara University, New York https://www.nps.gov/nifa/index.htm (716) 286-8579 No Facebook contact found on home page.

Designated by Congress in 2008, the Niagara Falls National Heritage Area stretches from the western boundary of Wheatfield, New York to the mouth of the Niagara River on Lake Ontario, including the communities of Niagara Falls, Youngstown, and Lewiston. The region is home to natural wonders, rich cultural traditions, and nationally significant historical sites. Park your car and experience Niagara’s iconic landscape, rich history and the thriving culture and communities along the scenic Niagara River with the ease and convenience of a hop-on/hop-off shuttle. Enjoy a day of discovery as you connect to over 12 destination sites along the 14-mile route from the “Falls to the Fort.” Serves downtown Niagara Falls, New York State Parks, Niagara University, Niagara Power Project Power Vista, Lewiston, Youngstown and Old Fort Niagara. The Niagara Falls National Heritage Area is one of 49 National Heritage Areas in the United States. Designated by the United States Congress in 2008, its mission is to preserve, protect and promote the historic, natural and cultural resources of the area stretching from Niagara Falls to Old Fort Niagara in Youngstown, New York. In August of 2012, Congress approved the Management Plan for the National Heritage Area. The National Heritage Area has been following the early-action recommendations in the Management Plan which include establishing a small grant program, building partnerships, developing educational programs and an interpretive plan for the National Heritage Area. For additional information on the 12 destination sites and for specific accessibility questions pertaining to each site, please view http://www.discoverniagara.org/.

Statue of Liberty National Monument, Liberty Island (NJ, NY) https://www.nps.gov/stli/index.htm (212) 363-3200 (Park Information) https://www.facebook.com/statuelibrtynps/

“The Statue of Liberty Enlightening the World” was a gift of friendship from the people of France to the United States and is recognized as a universal symbol of freedom and democracy. The Statue of Liberty was dedicated on October 28, 1886. It was designated as a National Monument in 1924. Employees of the National Park Service have been caring for the colossal copper statue since 1933. Visiting Liberty Island is one of the most rewarding experiences of any trip to New York City. However, visitors who wish to enter the museum, pedestal, or crown must secure reservations. For over a decade, the National Park Service has implemented a reservation system. The National Park Service strongly recommends making advanced ticket reservations. Reservations secured far enough in advance allow visitors to select their desired level of access, and also eliminates the need to wait in line to purchase tickets. Crown tickets are available by advanced reservation only.

Visitors taking mass transportation to the ferry departure point should consult the proper agency regarding accessibility. For directions and transportation options, please reference the Plan Your Visit section on the website. The information center, gift pavilion, bookstore, dining facilities and exterior grounds are wheelchair accessible. For those with reservations to enter the monument, wheelchair access is provided by several elevators to the museum, the exterior of Fort Wood, and to the top of the pedestal. The outdoor observation deck balcony is not wheelchair accessible, but visitors still have access to the New York City skyline view. For information about programs, services, activities and requests regarding accommodations for persons with disabilities, please contact the park in writing or by email (see website for email access) at least twenty one (21) days in advance of your intended visit. The park telephone number is set forth above. All ferry tickets include access to Liberty Island, Ellis Island and the Immigration Museum. The museum is open to the public. For current information, check the alert at the top of the Ellis Island website. To visit both islands in one day, the National Park Service recommends an early ferry departure.

Washington-Rochambeau National Historic Trail (CT, DC, DE, MA, MD, NJ, NY, PA, RI, VA) https://www.nps.gov/waro/index.htm (215) 597-1581 https://www.facebook.com/Washington-Rochambeau-Revolutionary-Route-Natio...

In 1781, General Rochambeau’s French Army joined forces with General Washington’s Continental Army to fight the British Army in Yorktown, Virginia. With the French Navy in support, the allied armies moved hundreds of miles to become the largest troop movement of the American Revolution. The effort and cooperation between the two sides led to a victory at Yorktown and secured American independence. Rochambeau’s march north from July 1782 provided Americans an opportunity to give thanks to their country’s ally, for when the French infantry sailed out of Boston Harbor on Christmas Day 1782, King George III and Parliament had acknowledged the United States “to be free Sovereign and independent States.”

The Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historical Trail is over 680 miles of land and water trails that pass through nine states along the eastern coast of the United States. The trail’s large geographic presence serves to connect major metropolitan areas, national and state parks, historic and scenic trails, and countless other historic sites. Visitors can follow the route by exploring these different sites along the trail. Use the links on the website that listing each state to find sites that interpret the trail according to state. More information can also be found through our partner organization, the National Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Association, Inc. at W3R-US.org.

Additional noteworthy National Park sites located in New York that are not summarized in this guide include: African Burial Ground National Memorial, New York Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail (various states) Chesapeake Bay, Chesapeake Bay Watershed (various states) Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site, Hyde Park, New York Erie Canalway, National Heritage Corridor, New York Fire Island National Seashore, Patchogue, New York Fort Stanwix National Monument, Rome, New York General Grant National Memorial, New York Lower East Side Tenement Museum National Historic Site, Manhattan, New York North County National Scenic Trail (seven states) Saint Paul’s Church National Historic Site, Mount Vernon, New York Stonewall National Monument, New York Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site, Hyde Park, New York Women’s Rights National Historic Park, Seneca Falls, New York
NORTH CAROLINA

Pirates menaced the coastal settlements, but by 1718 the pirates had been captured and killed. In 1788, Raleigh was chosen as the site of the new capital, as its central location protected it from coastal attacks. Officially established in 1792 as both county seat and state capital, the city was named after Sir Walter Raleigh. North Carolina was the site of few battles, but during the American Civil War, it provided the Confederacy with at least 125,000 troops, which is far more than any other state did. Approximately 40,000 of those troops died: more than half of disease, the remainder from battlefield wounds and from starvation. North Carolina also supplied about 15,000 Union troops. The first Confederate soldier to be killed in the Civil War was Private Henry Wyatt from North Carolina, in the Battle of Big Bethel in June 1861. At Appomattox Court House in Virginia in April 1865, the 75th North Carolina Regiment, a cavalry unit, fired the last shots of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia in the Civil War. For many years, North Carolinians proudly boasted that they had been “First at Bethel, Farthest at Gettysburg and Chickamauga, and Last at Appomattox.”

North Carolina leads the nation in the production of tobacco, textiles, and furniture. North Carolina is the leading U.S. state in production of flue-cured tobacco and sweet potatoes, and is second in production of pigs and hogs, trout, and turkeys. In the three most recent USDA surveys (2002, 2007, 2012), North Carolina also ranked second in Christmas tree production. The Piedmont Triad, or center of the state, is home to Krispy Kreme, Mayberry, Texas Pete barbecue sauce, the Lexington Barbecue Festival, and Moravian cookies. Krispy Kreme, an international chain of doughnut stores, was started in North Carolina; the company’s headquarters are in Winston-Salem. Pepsi-Cola was first produced in 1898 in New Bern. The Yadkin Valley in particular has become a strengthening market for grape production, while Asheville recently won the recognition of being named ‘Beer City USA.’ Asheville boasts the largest breweries per capita of any city in the United States. The internationally acclaimed North Carolina Zoo in Asheboro attracts visitors to its animals, plants, and a 57-piece art collection along five miles of shaded pathways in the world’s largest-land-area Natural-Habitat Park. North Carolina has theme parks, aquariums, museums, historic sites, lighthouses, elegant theaters, concert halls, and fine dining. North Carolina is the home of more American Idol finalists than any other state: Clay Aiken (season two), Fantasia Barrino (season three), Kellie Pickler (season five), Bucky Covington (season five), Chris Daughtry (season five), Anoop Desai (season eight), Scotty McCreery (season ten), and Caleb Johnson (season thirteen). North Carolina has 10 National Parks, 2 National Heritage Areas, 2 Wild & Scenic Rivers managed by the NPS, and 3 National Trails managed by the NPS.

North Carolina Aquarium ncaquariums.com/roanoke-island 252.475.2300 Email:[email protected]
North Carolina Zoological Park nczoo.org 800.488.0444 Email:[email protected]
Appalachian National Scenic Trail (CT, GA, MA, MD, ME, NC, NH, NJ, NY, PA, TN VA, VT, WV) https://www.nps.gov/appa/index.htm (304) 535-6278 (Harpers Ferry, WV) No Facebook connection found on home page.

Conceived in 1921, built by private citizens, and completed in 1937, today the Appalachian Trail is managed by the National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, numerous state agencies and thousands of volunteers. The Appalachian Trail is a 2,180+ mile long public footpath that traverses the scenic, wooded, pastoral, wild, and culturally resonant lands of the Appalachian Mountains from Georgia to Maine. The Appalachian National Scenic Trail does not currently have a visitor center. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy, a national not-for-profit corporation has a visitor center in Harpers Ferry, WV. The Appalachian Trail has been enjoyed by visitors with a variety of disabilities - including the blind, hearing-impaired, and hikers with a range of mobility limitations. The trail is not highly developed though, and there are only a few sections that are considered fully accessible.

Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site, Flat Rock, North Carolina https://www.nps.gov/carl/index.htm (828) 693-4178 https://www.facebook.com/Carl-Sandburg-Home-National-Historic-Site-14459...

After the famous writer, folk singer, social activist and Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and biographer Carl Sandburg died on June 22, 1967, his wife requested that the home and surrounding buildings be preserved as a national park. The park’s vast historical and cultural resources include 264 acres of pastures, ponds, small mountains and hiking trails, as well as a total of fifty structures, including the Sandburg’s residence and goat barn. The museum and archival collection housed in the 4,000 square foot Museum Preservation center is also an important resource. It is the one of the biggest collections of its kind in the Southeast Region, containing 325,298 items that include letters, telegrams, maps, photographs, motion pictures, sound recordings and 12,000 volumes of the Sandburg’s books.

The Sandburg furnishings inside the home have been moved to storage for preservation work over the next two years (dates not specified on website). Special exhibits will help visitors to see the rooms as they were once furnished, but at the same time feel like they are going “behind the scenes” in the unfurnished rooms. Guided tours of the home are still available and provide a great way to learn more about the Sandburg family and their contributions to American history. The park is located on 264 acres in western North Carolina. Visitors can tour the Sandburg Home, hike on over 5 miles of trails, visit the farm and dairy goats, and much more. The average visitor spends two hours at “Connemara.” Admission is free for grounds, trails and barn; no park entrance fee. There is a guided house tour fee (cash or check only).

There are 2 accessible parking spaces near the pedestrian entrance to the park. The walk from the visitor parking lot to the home is 1/3 mile and gains 100 feet in elevation. This can be challenging for many visitors. If you feel this climb may be a challenge for you, please call a park ranger from either of two phones. One is located adjacent to the accessible parking spaces, the second is located on the wall outside of the restroom facilities near the lake. The ranger will either be able to provide a shuttle from the restrooms or will make other accommodations. Due to the nature of the park’s location on mountainous terrain, visitors will encounter changes in grade, uneven pathways and gravel paths. Please call ahead for more information or seek the assistance of a ranger at the start of your visit. The Sandburg Home is a three-story antebellum home built in 1838. The first floor is accessible as it is on ground level with small thresholds. The second story is accessible by stairs or a lift for visitors using mobility devices. The third story is only accessible by stairs; however, the bulk of the visitor tour is on the main level and second story of the home. A shuttle operates seasonally from the restrooms near the parking lot to the house and barn.

Fort Raleigh National Historic Site, Manteo, North Carolina   (252) 473-2111 – The general information phone number for the Outer Banks Group of parks (Cape Hatteras National Seashore, Fort Raleigh National Historic Site, and Wright Brothers National Memorial). https://www.facebook.com/FortRaleighNHS

Fort Raleigh National Historic Site protects and preserves known portions of England’s first New World settlements from 1584 to 1590. This site also preserves the cultural heritage of the Native Americans, European Americans and African Americans who have lived on Roanoke Island. The 1584 English Expedition paved the way for more expeditions to follow. The 1585 English Expedition led to the construction of Fort Raleigh. Archeological evidence reveals an earthwork and metallurgical activity that were a part of the English’s 1585 exploration sponsored by Sir Walter Raleigh. The earthwork seen today was reconstructed in 1950. The First Light of Freedom monument commemorates the Roanoke Island Freedman’s Colony that was set up during the American Civil War. The colony provided a safe haven and education for former slaves to help prepare them for a new life. In the Visitor Center, discover the in-depth heritage stories of Roanoke Island, from the Algonquian and the English to freedmen and a radio scientist. The Visitor Center, walking trails, restrooms, and Waterside Theatre are accessible. All ranger-conducted activities are accessible.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park (NC, TN) https://www.nps.gov/grsm/index.htm (865) 436-1200 – Visitor Information Recorded Message https://www.facebook.com/GreatSmokyMountainsNPS

Ridge upon ridge of forest straddles the border between North Carolina and Tennessee in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. World renowned for its diversity of plant and animal life, the beauty of its ancient mountains, and the quality of its remnants of Southern Appalachian mountain culture, this is America’s most visited National Park. Much of the Smokies can be enjoyed from your vehicle and from accessible facilities and programs offered in the park. Activities range from viewing scenery to exploring the intricacies of the forest floor to learning about the resourceful people who made a living from this wilderness. For a wealth of information concerning the various Visitor Centers, historic structures, trails, etc. that can be toured, please see the following website: https://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm.

National Historic Trail – Trail of Tears (AL, AR, GA, IL, KY, MO, NC, OK, TN) https://www.nps.gov/trte/index.htm (505) 988-6098 No Facebook connection was found on website.

Remember and commemorate the survival of the Cherokee people, forcefully removed from their homelands in Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee to live in Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail passes through the present-day states of Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Tennessee. A complete summary is set forth under the state of Alabama, one of the origins of the Trail.

Moores Creek National Battlefield, Currie, North Carolina https://www.nps.gov/mocr/index.htm (910) 283-5591, ext. 2234 https://www.facebook.com/moorescreeknps

In the early morning hours of February 27, 1776 Loyalist forces charged across a partially dismantled Moores Creek Bridge. Beyond the bridge, nearly 1,000 North Carolina Patriots waited quietly with cannons and muskets poised to fire. This battle marked the last broadsword charge by Scottish Highlanders and the first significant victory for the Patriots in the American Revolution. Often lost in a study of the Revolution are the “horrors of civil war” among Americans themselves—among supporters of independence (Patriots/Whigs), opponents (Loyalists/Tories), and the ambivalent Americans who were angry with Britain but opposed to declaring independence.

“Stories of the American Revolution” is the park’s premier Living History Program entrusted with interpreting the various battlefield stories related to the sights and sounds surrounding the battle of Moores Creek Bridge. Program highlights include 1st and 3rd person interpretation, battlefield encampments, musket and cannon demonstrations, as well as the interpretation of the daily life of the North Carolina militia, the Wilmington District Minutemen, and the Loyalists who were defeated here. We invite you to come and experience history first-hand.

The goal of the “Stories Beyond the Battlefield” Living History Program is to interpret the often untold stories of the daily life of the soldiers and civilians who fought for independence. This program is intended to paint a clearer picture of who these individuals were beyond their roles as a soldier. Program highlights include 1st and 3rd person interpretation and demonstrations of the trades and crafts that many of these soldiers were involved in, to include blacksmithing, candlemaking, spinning, wood working, cooking, and gardening to name a few.

Candlelight Tour: Every year on the third weekend in November, Moores Creek travels back to 1776. The park will be illuminated with more than 600 candles along a 3/4-mile path. Throughout the evening, your guided tour will encounter reenactors who will recount the Battle of Moores Creek Bridge. As you approach the bridge, bagpipes fill the air as Scottish Highlanders wielding broadswords meet you on the path. They lead you across the bridge on a charge up the causeway where you will be met with the sights and sounds of musket and cannon fire. The cost of this event is $3 per person. Children 12 years and under are free.

Moores Creek hosts regular Living History events throughout the year. These events range from full-day weekend programs to small informal presentations. Staff and volunteers conduct black powder demonstrations, historic tradeskills and other 18th century activities to help connect visitors with Colonial life. For more information on when these events will take place, contact us by phone (910) 283-5591 or follow us on Facebook.

Included in the park’s boundaries are two interpretive trails totaling one mile in length. These trails are wheelchair accessible, and they allow for easy access for visitors with physical disabilities. Benches are established along the trails to allow for resting and enjoyment of the surrounding environment.

Wright Brothers National Memorial, Manteo, North Carolina https://www.nps.gov/wrbr/index.htm (252) 473-2111 https://www.facebook.com/WrightBrothersNMem

Wind, sand, and a dream of flight brought Wilbur and Orville Wright to Kitty Hawk, North Carolina where, after four years of scientific experimentation, they achieved the first successful airplane flights on December 17, 1903. With courage and perseverance, these self-taught engineers relied on teamwork and application of the scientific process. What they achieved changed our world forever. Wright Brothers National Memorial is the place where Wilbur and Orville Wright spent years working on the mysteries of flight, the place where they first successfully flew, and the place where the nation commemorates and celebrates their historic achievement. Here, you can visit the locations where Wilbur and Orville Wright changed the world: The Flight Line; Reconstructed 1903 Camp Buildings; December 17, 1903, Sculpture (1903 Bronze Sculpture of the First Flight featuring a life size model of the 1903 Wright Flyer); and the Wright Brothers Monument.

From November 2016 to late summer/fall of 2018, the Wright Brothers National Memorial Visitor Center will be closed for a renovation project. The renovation will allow improvements to be made to the building’s infrastructure and the installation of brand new interactive exhibits. During this closure, the grounds will remain open and information and bookstore services will be available in a temporary facility near the parking lot. In the temporary facility, you will find (a) an information desk where you can speak to a National Park Service representative, (b) four small poster-style exhibit panels to learn more about the Wright brothers’ story, and (c) a bookstore. Due to the smaller size of the temporary facility, plan to spend your time while visiting the park primarily outdoors and please dress accordingly. Visitor Center parking and exhibits are accessible. The mall path is accessible.

NORTH DAKOTA

North Dakota is situated near the middle of North America with a stone marker in Rugby, North Dakota marking the “Geographic Center of the North American Continent.” The region is abundant in fossil fuels including natural gas, crude oil and lignite coal. The Missouri River forms Lake Sakakawea, the third largest man-made lake in the United States, behind the Garrison Dam. The rivalry between the two new states presented a dilemma of which was to be admitted first. Harrison directed Secretary of State James G. Blaine to shuffle the papers and obscure from him which he was signing first and the actual order went unrecorded, thus no one knows which of the Dakotas was admitted first. However, since North Dakota alphabetically appears before South Dakota, its proclamation was published first in the Statutes At Large. Since that day, it has become common to list the Dakotas alphabetically and thus North Dakota is usually listed as the 39th state. Sacagawea; May 1788 – December 20, 1812; also Sakakawea or Sacajawea, was a Lemhi Shoshone woman who helped the Lewis and Clark Expedition achieve each of its chartered mission objectives exploring the Louisiana Purchase.

Anti-corporate laws were passed that virtually prohibited a corporation or bank from owning title to land zoned as farmland. These laws, still in force today, after having been upheld by both state and federal courts, make it almost impossible to foreclose on farmland, as even after foreclosure, the property title cannot be held by a bank or mortgage company. North Dakota is the only state with a state-owned bank, the Bank of North Dakota in Bismarck, and a state-owned flour mill, the North Dakota Mill and Elevator in Grand Forks. These were established by the Non-Partisan League before World War II. Furthermore, the Bank of North Dakota, having powers similar to a Federal Reserve branch bank, exercised its power to limit the issuance of subprime mortgages and their collateralization in the form of derivative instruments, and so prevented a collapse of housing prices within the state in the wake of 2008’s financial crisis. Much of the recent growth has been based on development of the Bakken oil fields in the western part of the state. Estimates as to the remaining amount of oil vary, with some estimating over 100 years’ worth of oil remaining in the area. Old World folk customs have persisted for decades in North Dakota, with revival of techniques in weaving, silver crafting, and wood carving. According to Gallup data, North Dakota led the U.S. in job creation in 2013 and has done so since 2009. The state has recorded the highest personal income growth among all states for the sixth time since 2007. The state is the largest producer in the U.S. of many cereal grains, including barley (36% of U.S. crop), durum wheat (58%), hard red spring wheat (48%), oats (17%), and combined wheat of all types (15%). It is the second leading producer of buckwheat (20%). The state is the leading producer of many oilseeds, including 92% of the U.S. canola crop, 94% of flax seed, 53% of sunflower seeds, 18% of safflower seeds, and 62% of mustard seed. The state is also the largest producer of honey, dry edible peas and beans, lentils, and the third-largest producer of potatoes. New Salem is the site of the world’s largest statue of a Holstein cow; the world’s largest statue of a bison is in Jamestown. North Dakota has 3 National Parks, 1 National Heritage Area, 2 National Trails managed by the NPS, 6 National Historic Landmarks and 4 National Natural Landmarks.

Dakota Zoo dakotazoo.org 701.223.7543 Email:[email protected]dakotazoo.org
Roosevelt Park Zoo rpzoo.com 701.857.4166 Email:[email protected]
Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site, Williston, North Dakota https://www.nps.gov/fous/index.htm (701) 572-9083 No Facebook connection on home page.

Between 1828 and 1867, Fort Union was the most important fur trade post on the Upper Missouri River. Here, the Assiniboine and six other Northern Plains Indian Tribes exchanged buffalo robes and smaller furs for goods from around the world, including cloth, guns, blankets, and beads. A bastion of peaceful coexistence, the post annually traded over 25,000 buffalo robes and $100,000 in merchandise. Accessibility: Bourgeois House – (Visitor Center): Main floor is fully accessible. This building houses the bookstore, exhibit area and bathrooms (handicap available). One permanent ramp and one portable ramp allow access to Visitor Center; staff will install the portable ramp upon request. (Main and Inner Gates, Store Range, Dwelling Range, Blacksmith Shop, Ice House, Powder Magazine, Dairy, Small Sheds, Flagpole, and Buffalo Press): All locations are in the Fort Courtyard and are accessible. The grounds are mostly flat. The fort grounds are mostly dirt and gravel paths with a few wooden sidewalks. Because the dirt paths and wooden sidewalks can become muddy and slippery, please use caution when exploring the grounds during inclement weather. After a heavy rain or melted snow, some site paths may become too soft for wheelchairs to safely access. Clerk’s Office: This is possibly accessible, the approach includes a slight incline and, a 35-inch-wide entrance door, and a small 1.5 inch step. Bell tower & Kitchen: Steps prevent wheelchair access, but can view Bell Tower from ground level. Indian Trade House: A large step into the Trade House impairs wheelchair access. A video tour program of the Trade House is available in the wheelchair-accessible Visitor Center. Palisade walls, Northeast Bastion , and Southwest Bastion: The palisade wall gallery and bastions are accessible only by a one-story outside staircase and interior ladders. Parking Lot and Sidewalk to Fort Site: The parking lot nearest the Visitor Center includes two handicap-accessible parking spots. The sidewalk leading up from the parking lots to the Fort Site is concrete and wheelchair accessible. The sidewalk is about 500 feet long and includes an incline. During the summer months, cart rides for limited-mobility visitors are available from the nearer parking lot to the fort. Please have a member of your party contact the ranger at the Visitor Center desk. Individuals with specific accessibility requirements are encouraged to contact the park in advance to discuss their needs by calling park staff at (701) 572-9083.

Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site, Stanton, North Dakota https://www.nps.gov/knri/index.htm (701) 745-3300 https://www.facebook.com/KnifeRiverIndianVillagesNHS

Earth lodge people hunted bison and other game, but were in essence farmers living in villages along the Missouri and its tributaries. The site was a major Native American trade center for hundreds of years prior to becoming an important market place for fur traders after 1750. Imagine a busy earth lodge village full of life and excitement. Women sitting on platforms singing to their gardens, girls playing with homemade leather dolls, boys practicing with their first bow and arrow, old men smoking tobacco and laughing at each other’s stories. You hear Hidatsa and Mandan and maybe even Lakota, English, French, or German. Or perhaps you hear the howling winds of a winter blizzard. Thick wood smoke stings your eyes and cold air nips at your nose but the thick buffalo robe around your shoulders keeps you warm. Whether you’re interested in Native American history, Lewis and Clark, natural history (ornithology, entomology, botany, meteorology, or astronomy), or enjoying picturesque scenery, you can find it here.

The main parking lot in front of the visitor center includes designated parking for guests with disabilities. Upon arrival, the rest of the journey is either by foot or, if necessary, by wheelchair. The park has paved surfaces around the visitor center and in the earth lodge. The park has 3 trails. The trails have gravel on one of them. Those who use wheelchairs are welcome to travel the gravel trail. However, it should be noted that the trail can be soft, rough and uneven making it hard to access with a wheelchair. The other two trails are mowed grass trails, which are not recommended for wheelchair access. The Visitor Center is one level that includes a theater, museum and bookstore.

Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail (ID,IL,IA,KS,MO,MT,NE,ND,OR,SD,WA) https://www.nps.gov/lecl/index.htm (402) 661-1804 (Omaha, Nebraska) https://www.facebook.com/lewisandclarknht

Between May 1804 and September 1806, 31 men, one woman, and a baby traveled from the plains of the Midwest to the shores of the Pacific Ocean and back. They called themselves the Corps of Discovery. In their search for a water route to the Pacific Ocean, they opened a window into the west for the young United States. Sacagawea; May 1788–December 20, 1812; also Sakakawea or Sacajawea, was a Lemhi Shoshone woman who helped the Lewis and Clark Expedition achieve each of its chartered mission objectives exploring the Louisiana Purchase. Over two hundred years later, visitors can retrace the Expedition’s path by following the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Among the more than 100 sites along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail, only five are National Park Service sites. To learn more about sites along the Trail, visit the Basic Information page under the Plan Your Visit section on the website. The Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail Headquarters Visitor Center is a handicapped accessible site. Bathrooms and most displays are accessible to those who are mobility impaired. The interpretive film is also accessible, has open caption and full audio.

OHIO

Ohio was the first entirely American state. The original 13 started as British colonies, and the next three—Vermont, Kentucky, and Tennessee—were spun off from them. But Ohio sprang Athena-like from the head of Congress, as the first state formed from the Northwest Territory. Ohio is historically known as the “Buckeye State” after its Buckeye trees, and Ohioans are also known as “Buckeyes.” In 1835, Ohio fought with Michigan in the Toledo War, a mostly bloodless boundary war over the Toledo Strip. Varying interpretations of the law caused the governments of Ohio and Michigan to both claim sovereignty over a 468-square-mile region along the border, now known as the Toledo Strip. Congress intervened, making Michigan’s admittance as a state conditional on ending the conflict. In exchange for giving up its claim to the Toledo Strip, Michigan was given the western two-thirds of the Upper Peninsula, in addition to the eastern third that was already considered part of the state. The later discovery of copper and iron deposits and the plentiful timber in the Upper Peninsula more than offset Michigan’s economic loss in surrendering Toledo. By the end of the Civil War, the Union’s top three generals–Ulysses S. Grant, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Philip Sheridan–were all from Ohio. Eight US Presidents hailed from Ohio at the time of their elections, giving rise to its nickname “Mother of Presidents”, a sobriquet it shares with Virginia. It is also termed “Modern Mother of Presidents,” in contrast to Virginia’s status as the origin of presidents earlier in American history. Seven Presidents were born in Ohio, making it second to Virginia’s eight. With about 70,000 people in 2015, Ohio had the largest Amish population of all the United States. Ohio’s manufacturing sector is the third-largest of all fifty United States in terms of gross domestic product. No Republican has ever won the presidency without winning Ohio. Ohio has 8 National Parks, 2 National Heritage Areas, 3 Wild & Scenic Rivers managed by the NPS, and 1 National Trail managed by the NPS.

Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden cincinnatizoo.org 513.281.4700 Email:[email protected]
Cleveland Metroparks Zoo clevelandmetroparks.com/Zoo/Zoo.aspx 216.661.6500 Email:[email protected]
Columbus Zoo and Aquarium columbuszoo.org 614.645.3400 Email:[email protected]
Newport Aquarium newportaquarium.com 800.406.3474 Email:[email protected]
Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Cleveland and Akron, Ohio https://www.nps.gov/cuva/index.htm (330) 657-2752 – This information line is answered by staff at Boston Store Visitor Center. https://www.facebook.com/CuyahogaValleyNationalPark

Though a short distance from the urban areas of Cleveland and Akron, Cuyahoga Valley National Park seems worlds away. The park is a refuge for native plants and wildlife, and provides routes of discovery for visitors. The winding Cuyahoga River gives way to deep forests, rolling hills, and open farmlands. Take a hike, ride the scenic railroad, explore the visitor centers, attend a concert, or walk or bike the Towpath Trail to follow the historic route of the Ohio & Erie Canal. Whether you prefer attending ranger-guided programs or exploring the park on your own, you can find something to your liking. Begin your adventure at Boston Store Visitor Center. Pick up or download the park’s Schedule of Events. Ranger-led program descriptions include trail surface, presence of stairs and hills, distance, and pace. The Popular Park Attraction Brochure (provided on the website) will guide you to additional information. All visitor centers are accessible. Our park map (provided on the website) shows exact locations and specific features. Many of the park’s most popular attractions are fully accessible: the Ohio & Erie Canal Towpath Trail (including the Beaver Marsh near Ira Trailhead), Canal Exploration Center, the Everett Covered Bridge, Brandywine Falls (upper boardwalk), and the heronry along Bath Road. The Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad has a car with a lift. To request seats in it, call (800) 468-4070, ext. 1. Horseshoe Pond has an accessible fishing pier close to the parking lot. The Picnic Shelters at Octagon and Ledges are accessible rental facilities. The National Park and its partners offer self-guided Canalway Quests. Rhyming clues tell a place’s special story. Quests list mobility considerations; several are wheelchair accessible.

Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park, Dayton, Ohio https://www.nps.gov/daav/index.htm (937) 225-7705 No Facebook connection found on website.

Three exceptional men from Dayton, Ohio, Wilbur Wright, Orville Wright and Paul Laurence Dunbar, found their creative outlet here through accomplishments and failures, and finally success. However, these men offered the world something far greater, they offered the world hope, and the ability to take a dream and make it a reality. The five sites of Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park offer you the opportunity to experience the historically refurnished Wright brothers’ printing office, walk through an original Wright brothers’ bicycle shop, see the Wright brothers’ third airplane, follow Wilbur and Orville’s footsteps at the Huffman Prairie Flying Field, visit Hawthorn Hill (the Wrights’ mansion), and experience Paul Laurence Dunbar’s last home.

Wright-Dunbar Interpretive Center ● Parking: four spaces available, closest to building in parking lot off of Sanford Ct. ● Entrance: Front and side doors to visitor center open outwards, manually operated. ● Elevator: There is an elevator located just past the restrooms inside the building which allows access to the second floor interpretive displays and the limited-access staff offices on the third floor. ● Restrooms: Men’s and Women’s both wheelchair accessible. ● Exhibits: Artifacts and interpretive panels on display, some behind cordoned-off areas in different rooms, visually and physically available from a wheelchair.

Wright Cycle Company ● Same parking area as Wright-Dunbar Interpretive Center, four spaces available ● Wheelchair accessible from north side of building via wheelchair ramp. ● Exhibits: Artifacts and interpretive panels on display, some behind cordoned-off areas, visually and physically available from a wheelchair.

Huffman Prairie Interpretive Center ● Parking: four spaces available ● Restrooms: Men’s and Women’s both wheelchair accessible. ● Exhibits: Artifacts and interpretive panels on display, some behind cordoned-off areas in different rooms, visually and physically available from a wheelchair.

Hopewell Culture National Historical Park, Chillicothe, Ohio https://www.nps.gov/hocu/index.htm (740) 774-1126 https://www.facebook.com/hopewellohionps/

Earthen mounds and embankments forming huge geometric enclosures grace the landscape of the Ohio River Valley. These monumental structures were built by Native American hands almost 2,000 years ago. Hopewellian people gathered at these earthworks for feasts, funerals and rites of passage. Come learn about these sacred spaces and reflect upon the lives of these American Indians. The most striking Hopewell sites contain earthworks in the form of circles, squares, and other geometric shapes. Many of these sites were built to a monumental scale, with earthen walls up to 12 feet high outlining geometric figures more than 1,000 feet across. Conical and loaf-shaped earthen mounds up to 30 feet high are often found in association with the geometric earthworks. Hopewell Culture National Historical Park preserves six earthwork complexes: High Bank Works, Hopeton Earthworks, Hopewell Mound Group, Mound City Group, Seip Earthworks and Spruce Hill Earthworks. Six important archaeological sites – one National Park.

Mound City Group Visitor Center: Parking: Two spaces available, closest to building; Visitor Center is accessible. Trails: Paved from parking lot area, flat surface. One paved sidewalk, slight decline when walking towards the nature trail and mound enclosure area. Nature trail covered with mulch and pebbled dirt on north side of enclosure, south side of trail is grassy and flat. Restrooms: Men’s and Women’s both wheelchair accessible with wall-mounted baby changing stations in both. Benches and picnic tables: Provided around the outside of visitor center building, including a few wheelchair-friendly picnic tables. Exhibits: Artifacts on display in glass cases, visually and physically available from a wheelchair. Bench and interactive kiosk in rear of museum are wheelchair friendly. Exit doors from museum to paved patio are manually operated. Mobility-Impaired: One All-Terrain wheelchair is available for first come, first served use. Wheels have deep, oversize tread to help with traction on mulch, dirt and grass trails. Availability of All-Terrain wheelchair is during normal Visitor Center operating hours.

Hopeton Earthworks: No visitor services building on site; one small portable restroom available at parking area. Paved parking area, designated spaces near trailhead. Trails: Paved from parking lot area, flat surface. Remainder of trails are grass, mulch and gravel-covered on uneven terrain.

Hopewell Mound Group: No visitor services building on site, small restroom facility available at parking area. Parking: Two spaces available, closest to restroom facility. Trails: Paved from parking lot area, flat surface. One paved sidewalk which ends about 250 feet from parking area. Remainder of trails covered with mulch, pebbled dirt or grass. Elevation gain on northeast portion of perimeter trail. Slight elevation changes on north-side of perimeter trail. Narrow, wooden bridge crossing low-lying stream on north-northwest portion of perimeter trail. Restrooms: Men’s and Women’s both wheelchair accessible. Picnic shelter: Open-air, covered shelter provided on the south-side of parking area. Paved sidewalk from parking area to shelter entrance. Handicap accessible shelter with regular and wheelchair-friendly picnic tables.

Seip Earthworks: No visitor services building on site, one small portable restroom available near abandoned house (house not open to the public). Parking: Paved parking area, no designated spaces. Trails: Paved from parking lot area, flat surface. Two paved sidewalks, one to covered shelter and the other to portable restroom. Remainder of trails are grass covered on uneven terrain. Restrooms: One small portable restroom available near abandoned house (house not open to the public), halfway between parking area and Central Mound on closed, paved access road. Picnic Shelter: Open-air, covered shelter provided on the west, southwest-side of parking area. Paved sidewalk from parking area to shelter entrance. Handicap accessible shelter with regular and wheelchair-friendly picnic tables.

National Aviation National Heritage Site, Dayton, Ohio https://www.nps.gov/avia/index.htm (937) 225-7705 No Facebook connection found on website. From the straightforward bicycle shops that fostered the Wright brothers’ flying ambitions to the complex spacecraft that carried man to the moon, the National Aviation Heritage Area has everything you need to learn about this country’s aviation legacy. Be sure to include Dayton’s national park, Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park, on your visit of the aviation heritage areas. (Note: The National Aviation National Heritage Site and the Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park have the same street address and phone number, but the former (National Heritage Site) appears to involve more sites than the National Historical Park.) National Aviation National Heritage Sites include the following: National Museum of the United States Air Force National Aviation Hall of Fame Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park Wright B Flyer, Inc. Wright Image Group Historic WACO Field Armstrong Air & Space Museum Wright State University Wright Archives Aviation Trail, Inc. Visitor Center & Parachute Museum Historic Grimes Field Historic Woodland Cemetery & Arboretum Greene County Historical Society Vectren Dayton Air Show Dayton History Air Camp Created in 2004 by Congress, the National Aviation Heritage Area encompasses an eight-county area in Ohio (Montgomery, Greene, Miami, Clark, Warren, Champaign, Shelby, and Auglaize counties). The National Aviation Heritage Area is guided by the National Aviation Heritage Alliance, a private, not for profit corporation designated by Congress as the management entity of the heritage area. Many of the National Aviation Heritage Area sites are in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and provide accessibility for those who require assistance. To find out more, please contact the National Aviation Heritage Area site which you will be visiting and ask about their facilities and accessibility. You can visit Dayton Aviation Heritage’s webpage (resource/park is listed above in this guide) to view accessibility for the Wright-Dunbar Interpretive Center, Huffman Prairie Interpretive Center and the Wright Brothers Cycle Shop. (See the “Plan Your Visit” section on the home page of this website, accessed by clicking on the “Menu” icon in upper right-hand corner.)
OKLAHOMA

The state’s name is derived from the Choctaw words okla and humma, meaning “red people.” It is also known informally by its nickname, The Sooner State, in reference to the non-Native settlers who staked their claims on the choicest pieces of land before the official opening date, and the Indian Appropriations Act of 1889, which opened the door for white settlement in America’s Indian Territory. The name was settled upon statehood, Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory were merged and Indian was dropped from the name on November 16, 1907. Cimarron County in Oklahoma’s panhandle is the only county in the United States that touches four other states: New Mexico, Texas, Colorado and Kansas. Among the most geographically diverse states, Oklahoma is one of four to harbor more than 10 distinct ecological regions, with 11 in its borders – more per square mile than in any other state. Cavanal Hill is regarded by the Oklahoma Tourism & Recreation Department as the world’s tallest hill; at 1,999 feet, it fails their definition of a mountain by one foot. In 1927, Oklahoman businessman Cyrus Avery, known as the “Father of Route 66,” began the campaign to create U.S. Route 66. Using a stretch of highway from Amarillo, Texas to Tulsa, Oklahoma, to form the original portion of Highway 66, Avery spearheaded the creation of the U.S. Highway 66 Association to oversee the planning of Route 66, based in his hometown of Tulsa. Oklahoma has the longest drivable stretch of Route 66 in the nation. Tulsa is home to the largest airline maintenance base in the world, which serves as the global maintenance and engineering headquarters for American Airlines. Because of its position in the center of the United States, Oklahoma is also among the top states for logistic centers, and a major contributor to weather-related research. The state is the top manufacturer of tires in North America and contains one of the fastest-growing biotechnology industries in the nation. In 2007, the New York Times rated the Tulsa Ballet as one of the top ballet companies in the United States. The Oklahoma City Museum of Art contains the most comprehensive collection of glass sculptures by artist Dale Chihuly in the world. Oklahoma has 3 National Parks, 2 National Trails managed by the NPS, 22 National Historic Landmarks and 3 National Natural Landmarks.

Oklahoma City Zoological Park okczoo.org 405.424.3344 Email:[email protected]
Oklahoma Aquarium okaquarium.org 918.296.3474 Email:[email protected]
Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Sulphur, Oklahoma https://www.nps.gov/chic/index.htm (580) 622-7234 https://www.facebook.com/ChickasawNPS/

Springs, streams, lakes- whatever its form, water is the attraction at Chickasaw National Recreation Area. Little Niagara and Rock Creek beckon waders and swimmers. Relax in the coolness of shaded streams or take a dip in a swimming hole. Veterans Lake calls anglers to test their skills. Visitors to Chickasaw “get two parks in one” – the Platt Historic District and the Lake of the Arbuckles, where they enjoy swimming, boating, hiking, and cycling. In the Lake of the Arbuckles and other fishing areas, anglers can catch white bass, catfish, and sunfish. Hunters, too, can practice their sport in the park. Picnic areas furnish settings for family reunions and campgrounds welcome overnight stays. The Travertine Information and Nature Center, fishing docks and most restrooms are wheelchair accessible. Chickasaw National Recreation Area has completed work on wheelchair accessible campsites and restrooms with showers in the Buckhorn and Point Campgrounds. The park has completed construction of a two mile long concrete trail around Veterans Lake that is fully accessible.

Fort Smith National Historic Site (AR, OK) https://www.nps.gov/fosm/index.htm (479) 783-3961 https://www.facebook.com/FortSmithNPS

There are many exhibits, features, and other noteworthy items/places available to view and experience at the Fort Smith National Historic Site, but depending on your schedule and interest, you may only have time for a brief visit. Explore life on the edge of Indian Territory through the stories of soldiers, the Trail of Tears, dangerous outlaws, and the brave lawmen who pursued them.

If you have less than one hour: Tour the building, which includes Two Jails, Judge Parker’s Court Room, Exhibits on the U.S. Deputy Marshals, the Military Outlaws, and Trail of Tears. Visit the Gallows. Exhibits in the Visitor Center focus on Fort Smith’s military history from 1817–1871, western expansion, Judge Isaac C. Parker and the federal court’s impact on Indian Territory, U.S. Deputy Marshals and outlaws, Federal Indian policy, and Indian Removal including the Trail of Tears.

If you have one to three hours: Attend a Ranger-led program. Take a walking tour using Audio Wands (available for free at the Front Desk) of both the building and the grounds. Walk the grounds and read our Wayside Information Panels. Walk along the Arkansas River and view the Trail of Tears Overlook. Enjoy a picnic under one of the many shade trees or on one of our picnic tables located next to the main parking lot. Visit the Commissary Storehouse, Fort Smith’s oldest building. Watch the beautiful sunsets on Belle Point overlooking the confluence of the Arkansas and Poteau Rivers. Watch It Took Brave Men, a U.S. Deputy Marshal video. See what is growing in the Historic Officer’s Garden.

The Fort Smith National Historic Site takes great pride in its accessibility for disabled visitors. The Visitors’ Center is fully wheelchair accessible, and also houses one wheelchair for visitor use if needed. Audio wands are available to all visitors free of charge, and the audio program provides a description of almost all of our exhibits within the Visitor Center as well as on the walking tour of the outside wayside exhibits.

National Historic Trail – Trail of Tears (AL, AR, GA, IL, KY, MO, NC, OK, TN) https://www.nps.gov/trte/index.htm (505) 988-6098 No Facebook connection was found on website.

Remember and commemorate the survival of the Cherokee people, forcefully removed from their homelands in Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee to live in Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail passes through the present-day states of Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Tennessee. With a museum, education center, rural village and ancient village tour, the Cherokee Heritage Center in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, exemplifies Cherokee pride. One of the most striking and memorable exhibits in the museum is its Trail of Tears display with life-size casts of actual Cherokee tribal members during the forced removal. As you walk through the area, you’ll hear sounds of the wind, as well as women crying. Many of the other exhibits in the museum are interactive. Sit by a campfire and hear a tribal elder tell stories of the old way of life or walk into a cabin where a rocking chair squeaks as the family is rounded up and herded into camps to prepare for the forced march. A complete summary is set forth under the state of Alabama, one of the origins of the Trail.

OREGON

Oregon’s only national park, Crater Lake National Park, comprises the caldera surrounding Crater Lake, the deepest lake in the United States. Crater Lake is famous for its deep blue color and water clarity. The lake partly fills a nearly 2,148-foot-deep caldera that was formed around 7,700 years ago by the collapse of the volcano Mount Mazama. Oregon is also the top timber producer of the lower 48 states. The D River State Recreation Site off Highway 101 is home to two of the world’s largest kite festivals in the spring and fall. Oregon has 5 National Parks, 1 Wild & Scenic River managed by the NPS, 3 National Trails managed by the NPS, 17 National Historic Landmarks, and 10 National Natural Landmarks.

NOTE: Oregon is a full-service only state, meaning that you are not permitted to pump your own gasoline. Due to this requirement, it can be difficult to impossible to buy gasoline after business hours in the communities surrounding the monument. Fill up with gasoline before leaving major highways or urban areas if you will be traveling later than 7:00 p.m. in summer or 6:00 p.m. in winter. Recent changes in the law allowing for self-service after hours have taken effect, but many local businesses have not installed new pumps that can accommodate self-service.

Oregon Zoo oregonzoo.org 503.226.1561 Email:[email protected]
West Coast Game Park Safari westcoastgameparksafari.com 541.347.3106 Email:[email protected]
California National Historic Trail (CA, CO, ID, KS, MO, NE, NV, OR, UT, WY) https://www.nps.gov/cali/index.htm (801) 741-1012 https://www.facebook.com/oregoncalifornianps

Between 1841 and 1869, more than a quarter million people answered this call and crossed the plains and mountains to the West. These emigrants started their journeys in Kansas and Missouri, walking more than 2,000 miles for months in pursuit of a better life. The California and Oregon Trails follow the same route until Idaho, where they diverge, the Oregon Trail turning north to Oregon and the California Trail heading to California. A complete summary is set forth under the state of California, the final destination of the trail.

Crater Lake National Park, Crater Lake, Oregon https://www.nps.gov/crla/index.htm (541) 594-3000 No Facebook connection found on website.

Crater Lake inspires awe. Native Americans witnessed it form 7,700 years ago, when a violent eruption triggered the collapse of a towering volcano. With a depth of 1,943 feet, Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the United States - and one of the most beautiful. The water’s intense blue color is an indication of its great depth and purity. Surrounded by cliffs, the lake is fed entirely by rain and snow. Scientists consider Crater Lake to be the cleanest and clearest large body of water in the world. Artists, photographers, and sightseers stand in wonder at its blue water and stunning setting. Come visit, and be amazed!

Most of the park’s 183,000 acres are in the backcountry, and are generally inaccessible to visitors with mobility impairments. However, several front-country trails are fully accessible, and others have portions that may be negotiable with assistance. All commercial facilities and most administrative areas are accessible as well. Some picnic areas have wheelchair-accessible parking, bathrooms and tables. Most park restrooms are accessible, and many of the paved overlooks on Rim Drive have low cross-slopes and accessible exhibits. The only access to the shore of Crater Lake is the steep and difficult Cleetwood Cove Trail, and this trail is not recommended for wheelchairs or for those with mobility or health impairments. Facilities in Mazama Village are accessible, including the store, campground and restaurant. The 1/4-mile upper section of the Annie Creek Canyon Trail begins at the campground amphitheater and is mostly flat and wide. The trail’s descent into the canyon is too steep to be accessible, but the views from the top are excellent. Along with the Steel Visitor Center, there are several trails with accessible segments in the Park Headquarters Historic District. Several segments of The Lady of the Woods Loop are accessible and can be reached from the main parking lot, but most portions of this 1/3 -mile loop trail are steep and/or narrow. The Lodge, the Rim Café/Gift Shop and the Kiser Studio Visitor Center at Rim Village are all wheelchair accessible. The paved promenade in front of the gift shop provides views of Crater Lake with a grade of less than 5%. Also at Rim Village is Picnic Hill, where several sites have wheelchair accessible tables. Accessible by elevator, the top floor of the Rim Café/Gift Shop offers lake views and accessible exhibits.

Godfrey Glen Trail is the park’s fully accessible trail. This 1-mile loop has minimal cross-slopes and no grade higher than 9%. Visitors have completed the trail in manual wheelchairs and other mobility devices. The trail begins on Munson Valley Road (between Mazama Village and Park Headquarters) and winds through old-growth forest with canyon views. One mile down the Pinnacles Road is the Plaikni Falls Trailhead. The first ¾ of this trail is accessible to wheelchair users with assistance, but the final, short climb to the falls might be too steep. At the end of the Pinnacles Road is the Pinnacles Trail. This flat, wide trail ends at the park’s east boundary after 1 mile (not a loop trail). The Sun Notch Trail, located 4.4 miles from park headquarters on East Rim Drive, is a short uphill trail that offers great views of Phantom Ship and is accessible to strong wheelchair users with assistance.

East Rim Drive offers several accessible adventures. Vidae Falls Picnic Area has accessible picnic sites with parking and restrooms. The first hundred yards or so of the Crater Peak Trail, which leaves from this site, has a low grade, a wide surface and leads to a bridge under old growth forest. The surface may be too soft for unassisted wheelchairs when wet, however. Lost Creek Campground: From this secluded site, visitors can go some distance up Greyback Road, which has a wide, flat, compact surface and is closed to vehicles. Camping here may be challenging for those in wheelchairs, since the tent-only sites are at ground level. However, the restrooms are wheelchair accessible and have running water.

John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, Kimberly, Oregon https://www.nps.gov/joda/index.htm (541) 987-2333 https://www.facebook.com/JohnDayFossilBeds

John Day Fossil Beds National Monument is comprised of three separate units scattered in Oregon: the Sheep Rock Unit, the Painted Hills Unit, and the Clarno Unit. The three units of the monument hold some of the best fossil bearing locations within the larger John Day Fossil Beds, which cover most of eastern Oregon.

Thomas Condon Paleontology Center: The world-class museum displays over 500 fossil specimens chosen to represent the primary significance of the John Day Fossil Beds. Viewing windows into the laboratory and collections area allow the public to watch scientists actively studying fossils. Clarno Palisades: Tiny four-toed horses, huge rhino-like brontotheres, crocodilians, and meat-eating creodonts that once roamed ancient jungles are now found in the rocks of the Clarno Unit, as well as an incredibly diverse range of plant life. Painted Hills: Distinguished by varied stripes of red, tan, orange, and black, this area preserve a sequence of past climate change. The Painted Hills also contains a diverse assemblage of leaf fossils aging 39-30 million years old. Sheep Rock Unit: Geological formations found in the Sheep Rock Unit, including the green claystone layers of the Turtle Cove Member, date back 32-37 million years. New vertebrate fossils are continually being exposed through natural erosion. The distinctive 29 million-year-old Turtle Cove beds contain a remarkable number of mammal fossils. In fact, the vast majority of localities and museum specimens from the John Day Basin are from the Turtle Cove fauna. Given the span of time preserved in the Turtle Cove Member (about 5 million years), it is not surprising that the fauna is not homogenous; as the regional environment changed so did the mammals, and that evolutionary progression is depicted in the fauna.

Accessibility: The Thomas Condon Paleontology Center is located in the Sheep Rock Unit of the monument, 9 miles west of Dayville, Oregon. The parking lot has a non-sloping paved approach to the center. Inside the center are a fossil museum, theater, education room, bookstore, restrooms, and drinking fountains, all of which are accessible to visitors. Touch exhibits including a wide variety of fossil replicas are available in the center. The James Cant Ranch Historic District is located a quarter mile from the Thomas Condon Paleontology Center, and is open most weekdays. The ranch house contains a cultural museum, restrooms, and a drinking fountain, all of which are accessible to visitors in wheelchairs. Trails and Overlooks: Most of the park trails and overlooks are not considered accessible as they are surfaced with loose gravel, have drop-offs, or are steep. The Foree area of the Sheep Rock Unit has the ¼ mile Story in Stone Trail. It has a rough uneven asphalt surface with slopes that exceed ADA standards. Monument staff is reviewing project possibilities to create new ADA compliant trails. At the Painted Hills Unit, the ¼ mile Painted Cove Trail has 300 feet of boardwalk with some slope and an accessible parking area. Picnicking: Picnic areas and tables, accessible to visitors in wheelchairs, are available at all three units of the monument.

Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail (ID,IL,IA,KS,MO,MT,NE,ND,OR,SD,WA) https://www.nps.gov/lecl/index.htm (402) 661-1804 (Omaha, Nebraska) https://www.facebook.com/lewisandclarknht

Between May 1804 and September 1806, 31 men, one woman, and a baby traveled from the plains of the Midwest to the shores of the Pacific Ocean and back. They called themselves the Corps of Discovery. In their search for a water route to the Pacific Ocean, they opened a window into the west for the young United States. Sacagawea; May 1788 – December 20, 1812; also Sakakawea or Sacajawea, was a Lemhi Shoshone woman who helped the Lewis and Clark Expedition achieve each of its chartered mission objectives exploring the Louisiana Purchase. Over two hundred years later, visitors can retrace the Expedition’s path by following the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Among the more than 100 sites along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail, only five are National Park Service sites. To learn more about sites along the Trail, visit the Basic Information page under the Plan Your Visit section on the website. The Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail Headquarters Visitor Center is a handicapped accessible site. Bathrooms and most displays are accessible to those who are mobility impaired. The interpretive film is also accessible, has open caption and full audio.

Nez Perce National Historical Park (ID, MT, OR, WA) https://www.nps.gov/nepe/index.htm (208) 843-7009 https://www.facebook.com/DiscoverNezPerceNationalHistoricalPark

Established in 1965 to tell the story of the Nez Perce (Nimiipuu) people. Spread out over four states (Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington), following the route of the 1877 conflict, this park offers something for everyone. The history and culture of the Nez Perce surrounds the park. Discover how the Nimiipuu adapted and today thrive continuing to preserve their culture. Nez Perce National Historical Park has thirty-eight sites. For 11,000 years, the NiimiiPuu have been here. Their story is the story of the American Indian in all its glory and sadness. Park Rangers staff Visitor Centers in Spalding, Idaho and Wisdom, Montana. Other sites have staff, wayside exhibits or trail guides. There are dozens of interesting sites throughout this park and accessibility varies, so we suggest that you review the Visitors Guide found under the “Plan Your Visit” section on the website to determine which sites would be most appropriate for your family to visit. The Visitor Centers at Spalding and Big Hole battlefield have accessible restroom facilities and exhibits. Trails at Canoe Camp outside of Orofino, Idaho and the Heart of Monster in Kamiah, Idaho have accessible trails.

PENNSYLVANIA

On February 28, 1681, King Charles II granted a land charter to William Penn to repay a debt of £16,000 (around £2,100,000 in 2008, adjusting for retail inflation – each pound (£) equaled about $1.30 in U.S. dollars at that time) owed to William’s father, Admiral William Penn. This was one of the largest land grants to an individual in history. The King named it Pennsylvania (literally “Penn’s Woods”) in honor of the Admiral. Penn established a government with two innovations that were much copied in the New World: the county commission and freedom of religious conviction. When the Founding Fathers of the United States convened in Philadelphia in 1774, 12 colonies sent representatives to the First Continental Congress. Historian Richard B. Morris in 1973 identified the following seven figures as the key Founding Fathers: John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and George Washington. The Second Continental Congress, which also met in Philadelphia (in May 1775), drew up and signed the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia, but when that city was captured by the British, the Continental Congress escaped westward, meeting at the Lancaster courthouse on Saturday, September 27, 1777, and then to York. There they and its primary author, John Dickinson, drew up the Articles of Confederation that formed 13 independent colonies into a new nation. Later, the Constitution was written, and Philadelphia was once again chosen to be cradle to the new American Nation. The Constitution was drafted and signed at the Pennsylvania State House, now known as Independence Hall, and the same building where the Declaration of Independence was signed. Pennsylvania became the second state to ratify the U.S. Constitution on December 12, 1787, five days after Delaware became the first.

Following the rejection of the capitol building designed by Chicago architect Henry Ives Cobb, Joseph Miller Huston of Philadelphia was chosen to design the present Pennsylvania State Capitol that incorporated Cobb’s building into magnificent public work finished and dedicated in 1907. The new state Capitol drew rave reviews. Its dome was inspired by the domes of St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome and the United States Capitol. Of all the colonies, only Rhode Island had religious freedom as secure as in Pennsylvania. Voltaire, writing of William Penn in 1733, observed: “The new sovereign also enacted several wise and wholesome laws for his colony, which have remained invariably the same to this day. The chief is, to ill–treat no person on account of religion, and to consider as brethren all those who believe in one God.” One result of this uncommon freedom was a wide religious diversity, which continues to the present.

Pennsylvania is home to the oldest investor-owned utility company in the U.S.A, The York Water Company. The first nationally chartered bank in the United States, the Bank of North America, was founded in 1781 in Philadelphia. After a series of mergers, the Bank of North America is part of Wells Fargo, which uses national charter 1. Pennsylvania is also the home to the first nationally chartered bank under the 1863 National Banking Act. That year, the Pittsburgh Savings & Trust Company received a national charter and renamed itself the First National Bank of Pittsburgh as part of the National Banking Act. That bank is still in existence today as PNC Financial Services and remains based in Pittsburgh. PNC is the state’s largest bank, and the sixth-largest in the United States. The University of Pennsylvania, located in Philadelphia, is considered the first university in the United States and established the country’s first medical school. The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts is the first and oldest art school in the United States. Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, now a part of University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, was the first pharmacy school in the United States. Pennsylvania is home to the nation’s first zoo, the Philadelphia Zoo. Pennsylvania has 19 National Parks, 7 National Heritage Areas, 4 Wild & Scenic Rivers managed by the NPS, 5 National Trails managed by the NPS, 167 National Historic Landmarks, 27 National Natural Landmarks, and 1 World Heritage Site.

Pittsburgh Zoo & Aquarium pittsburghzoo.org 412.665.3640 Email:[email protected]
Philadelphia Zoo philadelphiazoo.org 215.243.1100 [email protected]
Appalachian National Scenic Trail (CT, GA, MA, MD, ME, NC, NH, NJ, NY, PA, TN VA, VT, WV) https://www.nps.gov/appa/index.htm (304) 535-6278 (Harpers Ferry, WV) No Facebook connection found on home page.

Conceived in 1921, built by private citizens, and completed in 1937, today the Appalachian Trail is managed by the National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, numerous state agencies and thousands of volunteers. The Appalachian Trail is a 2,180+ mile long public footpath that traverses the scenic, wooded, pastoral, wild, and culturally resonant lands of the Appalachian Mountains from Georgia to Maine. The Appalachian National Scenic Trail does not currently have a visitor center. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy, a national not-for-profit corporation has a visitor center in Harpers Ferry, WV. The Appalachian Trail has been enjoyed by visitors with a variety of disabilities - including the blind, hearing-impaired, and hikers with a range of mobility limitations. The trail is not highly developed though, and there are only a few sections that are considered fully accessible.

Edgar Allen Poe National Historic Site, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania https://www.nps.gov/edal/index.htm (215) 965-2305 –This phone number rings up the Independence Visitor Center, open 7 days a week. To phone the Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site directly, call (215) 597-8780, Friday through Sunday from 9 a.m. to 12 noon, and 1p.m. to 5p.m. No Facebook connection found on website.

Described as horrifying, mystifying, and full of genius, Poe’s writing has engaged readers all over the globe. The six years Poe lived in Philadelphia were his happiest and most productive. Yet Poe also struggled with bad luck, personal demons and his wife’s tuberculosis. In Poe’s humble home, reflect on the human spirit surmounting crushing obstacles, and celebrate Poe’s astonishing creativity. Please remember that the site is open Friday through Sunday from 9a.m.–12 noon and 1 p.m.–5 p.m. The site is closed from 12 noon–1 p.m. Although the site is located at 532 N. 7th Street in Philadelphia, it is nearly a mile from the sites in the historic district, like the Liberty Bell Center and Independence Hall. There is no fee to enter the site and reservations are not required for families and individuals. Visitors may opt for a self-guided experience, or they may request a ranger-led tour. The site includes the unfurnished home where Poe resided, and an adjacent home with exhibits and the Reading Room. Many visitors stay at the site for several hours, exploring the home, reading the exhibits, and listening to Poe’s tales and poems on CD in the Reading Room.

The Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site is only partially accessible. There is a ramp to gain entrance to the main museum area, which includes exhibits and the park film. To access the ramp it is recommended that visitors call ahead, (215) 597-8780, as the ramp is located behind a locked fence. The historic home is not accessible, nor are there any accessible restrooms.

Flight 93 National Memorial, Stoystown, Pennsylvania https://www.nps.gov/flni/index.htm (814) 893-6322 https://www.facebook.com/Flight-93-National-Memorial-140713145969140/

On Tuesday morning, September 11, 2001, the U.S. came under attack when four commercial airliners were hijacked and used to strike targets on the ground. Nearly 3,000 people tragically lost their lives. Because of the actions of the 40 passengers and crew aboard one of the planes, Flight 93, the attack on the U.S. Capitol was thwarted.

The Visitor Center Complex opened on September 10, 2015. Please plan for approximately 45 minutes to explore the exhibit space, Flight Path Overlook, and Eastern National bookstore and sales area. There are no restrooms in the Visitor Center. Restrooms with flush toilets are located next to the parking lot area in the low flat building along the flight path. The Visitor Center is located behind the tall Memorial Walls which flank the Flight Path Walkway (black granite pavers).

The Memorial Plaza is a one-mile drive from the Visitor Center Complex. Turn right as you exit the Visitor Center Complex parking lot and continue along Ring Road. There are also two walking trails which visitors may use to visit the Memorial Plaza. The Memorial Plaza includes a small visitor shelter to get out of the weather and a 1/4-mile walkway along the crash site and debris field which leads you to the Wall of Names, located along the flight path. The walkway is ADA accessible. Waterless restroom facilities are available at the Memorial Plaza at the lower end of the parking lot area. Parking at the Memorial Plaza is limited, and during peak visitation (May-October, 11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.) the lot may be full. Early morning is the best time to visit. The Memorial Plaza is fully accessible. Parking - There are designated accessible parking spots as part of the new parking area. Paths - The walkways/sidewalks and the Memorial Plaza are all paved, wide, and even. Restrooms - Restroom facilities are fully accessible.

Gettysburg National Military Park, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania https://www.nps.gov/gett/index.htm (717) 334-1124 https://www.facebook.com/GettysburgNPS

The Battle of Gettysburg was a turning point in the Civil War, the Union victory that ended General Robert E. Lee’s second and most ambitious invasion of the North. Often referred to as the “High Water Mark of the Rebellion,” Gettysburg was the Civil War’s bloodiest battle and was also the inspiration for President Abraham Lincoln’s immortal “Gettysburg Address.” The National Park Service Museum and Visitor Center is the place to begin your visit to Gettysburg National Military Park. Here visitors will find information on how to visit the park and what to see around Gettysburg. The Gettysburg Museum of the Civil War, with 22,000 square feet of exhibit space, features relics of the Battle of Gettysburg and personalities who served in the Civil War, inter-active exhibits, and multi-media presentations that cover the conflict from beginning to end as well as describe the Battle of Gettysburg and its terrible aftermath. The center also hosts the film, “A New Birth of Freedom,” narrated by award winning actor Morgan Freeman.

Parking for disabled visitors is available in Parking Lot 1, the closest to the Visitor Center, though arrangements for pick up and drop off in the group entry area can be arranged through the Gettysburg Foundation, which operates the building. Restrooms area accessible from the lobby and museum area.

The park has more than 26 miles of paved roads open for touring by private vehicle. Visitors with special needs may tour the park on their own with the use of the Official Map and Guide that includes a map of the park and self-guiding auto tour, or with a licensed battlefield guide (recommended), both of which are available at the National Park Service Museum and Visitor Center at 1195 Baltimore Pike, Gettysburg. Access to exhibits at tour stops are designed to be mobility friendly and accessible though uneven surfaces and weather may affect access. If this condition is found, the park would appreciate a call from the affected party so the situation can be remedied. For Those With Mobility Impairments: Touring may be done in your own vehicle. Private companies in Gettysburg offer bus tours. Wayside plaques and exhibits along the tour route are partially accessible on paths and in flat, grass covered areas. Restrooms along the tour route are not handicapped accessible except for the restrooms at the West End Guide Station on US Rt. 30.

In connection with the Gettysburg Park, a side trip to the David Wills House in downtown Gettysburg welcomes visitors. David Wills’ home was the center of the immense clean-up process after the Battle of Gettysburg. In a second-floor bedroom, President Abraham Lincoln put the finishing touches on the Gettysburg Address - the speech transformed Gettysburg from a place of sorrow to the symbol of our nation’s “new birth of freedom.” The museum features six galleries including the restored office where David Wills coordinated post-battle recovery efforts and invited a President to deliver “a few appropriate remarks,” and the famous Lincoln bedroom where the President finished revising his Gettysburg Address. See the website for additional information about the David Wills House.

Independence National Historical Park, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania https://www.nps.gov/inde/index.htm (215) 965-2305 https://www.facebook.com/IndependenceNHP

“We hold these Truths to be self-evident, that all Men are created equal...”

Goods, ideas, and people intermingled in early Philadelphia. In this diverse city, a new republic was born. The Declaration of Independence and U.S. Constitution were both debated and signed inside Independence Hall. Nearby sits the Liberty Bell, an international symbol of liberty. No tickets are needed to visit the Liberty Bell. Entrance to Independence Hall is by tour only. Tickets are required March through December. No tickets are required in January and February. Explore a state-of-the-art museum honoring Philadelphia’s own Benjamin Franklin. Pick up Independence Hall tickets, plan your visit, and watch films in the Independence Visitor Center. There is no fee to enter the building or watch the films. Ask the knowledgeable park rangers about programs, walking tours and special events. Independence Hall tickets are distributed each day (March through December) from the Ranger’s Desk in the Independence Visitor Center. This is the only place to obtain your free, timed entry ticket to tour Independence Hall. A limited number of tickets are available each day, so plan to arrive by 8:30 a.m. for the best selection of tour times. It is also possible to purchase advance tickets; see the website for this information.

Most park buildings are accessible. See the following link (https://www.nps.gov/inde/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm for specific information concerning various park sites. Accessible restrooms are available in the Independence Visitor Center and in the Benjamin Franklin Museum (fee applies). There are also accessible restrooms at the Germantown White House (Deshler-Morris House) located in Germantown.

Washington-Rochambeau National Historic Trail (CT, DC, DE, MA, MD, NJ, NY, PA, RI, VA) https://www.nps.gov/waro/index.htm (215) 597-1581 https://www.facebook.com/Washington-Rochambeau-Revolutionary-Route-Natio...

In 1781, General Rochambeau’s French Army joined forces with General Washington’s Continental Army to fight the British Army in Yorktown, Virginia. With the French Navy in support, the allied armies moved hundreds of miles to become the largest troop movement of the American Revolution. The effort and cooperation between the two sides led to a victory at Yorktown and secured American independence. Rochambeau’s march north from July 1782 provided Americans an opportunity to give thanks to their country’s ally, for when the French infantry sailed out of Boston Harbor on Christmas Day 1782, King George III and Parliament had acknowledged the United States “to be free Sovereign and independent States.”

The Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historical Trail is over 680 miles of land and water trails that pass through nine states along the eastern coast of the United States. The trail’s large geographic presence serves to connect major metropolitan areas, national and state parks, historic and scenic trails, and countless other historic sites. Visitors can follow the route by exploring these different sites along the trail. Use the links on the website that listing each state to find sites that interpret the trail according to state. More information can also be found through our partner organization, the National Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Association, Inc. at W3R-US.org.

RHODE ISLAND

Rhode Island is the smallest in area and the second most densely populated of the 50 U.S. states, following New Jersey. Its official name, “State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations,” is also the longest of any state in the Union. On May 4, 1776, Rhode Island became the first of the Thirteen Colonies to renounce its allegiance to the British Crown, and on May 29, 1790, Rhode Island became the 13th and last state to ratify the Constitution. Seeking religious and political tolerance, Roger Williams and others founded Providence Plantation as a free proprietary colony. In 1644, the Providence, Portsmouth, and Newport settlements united for their common independence as the “Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.” The Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations enacted the first law prohibiting slavery in North America on May 18, 1652. A rare type of rock called Cumberlandite is found only in Rhode Island (specifically in the town of Cumberland) and is the state rock. There were initially two known deposits of the mineral, but it is an ore of iron and one of the deposits was extensively mined for its ferrous content. Important industries in Rhode Island’s past included textiles toolmaking, costume jewelry, and silverware. Today, much of the economy of Rhode Island is based in services, particularly healthcare and education, and still manufacturing to some extent. Per the 2013 American Communities Survey, Rhode Island has the highest paid elementary school teachers in the country, with an average salary of $75,028 (adjusted to inflation).

More Rhode Island Firsts: The oldest Fourth of July Parade in the country is still held annually in Bristol, Rhode Island. The first Baptist Church in America was founded in Providence in 1638. Touro Synagogue was the first synagogue in America, founded in Newport in 1763. Pelham Street in Newport was the first in America to be illuminated by gaslight in 1806. Watch Hill has the nation’s oldest flying horses carousel that has been in continuous operation since 1850. The first nine-hole golf course in America was completed in Newport in 1890. The first NFL night game was held on November 6, 1929 at Providence’s Kinsley Park. The inaugural X Games (extreme sports) were held during the 1995 summer in Newport, Rhode Island. The International Tennis Hall of Fame is in Newport at the Newport Casino, site of the first U.S. National Championships in 1881. The first fully automated post office in the country is located in Providence.

Rhode Island has 2 National Parks, 1 National Heritage Area, 1 National Trail managed by the NPS, 45 National Historic Landmarks, and 1 National Natural Landmark.

Roger Williams Park Zoo rwpzoo.org 401.785.3510 Email:[email protected]
Biomes Marine Biology Center biomescenter.com 401.885.4690 Email:[email protected]
Blackstone River Valley National Historical Park (RI, MA) https://www.nps.gov/blrv/index.htm (508) 234-4242, ext. 108 https://www.facebook.com/BlackstoneNPS

The Blackstone River powered America’s entry into the Age of Industry. The Blackstone River runs from Worcester, Massachusetts, to Providence, Rhode Island. Its waters powered the Slater Mill in Pawtucket, RI, America’s first successful cotton spinning mill. The success of Samuel Slater’s cotton spinning mill touched off a chain reaction that changed how people worked and where they lived, and continues to reverberate across the nation to this day. Come visit and see how this revolution transformed the landscape of the Blackstone Valley and then the United States.

On December 19, 2014, President Obama signed legislation to establish Blackstone River Valley National Historical Park. The Blackstone River Valley National Historical Park is still in the planning stages, but there are things for visitors to do right now both within the park and throughout the Blackstone Valley. There are four mill villages within the park. The Slater Mill offers programs (for a fee). The Blackstone River State Park is open dawn to dusk for you to enjoy the bikeway and other features. The Wilbur Kelly House transportation museum is open, for free, from April through October. If you would like to explore parts of the park on your own, please feel free to download one of our self-guided walking tour brochures. Pawtucket Walking Tour Brochure, Slatersville Walking Tour Brochure, Hopedale Walking Tour Brochure, and Whitinsville Walking Tour Brochure.

The park office at the Woonsocket Depot is accessible. Accessible restrooms are available. There are so many sites included in the Blackstone River Valley National Historical Park that it is impossible to list accessibility for each one. To learn about the accessibility features offered at our “partner sites,” please check their websites or contact them directly. The list of partners can be found on the website at https://www.nps.gov/blrv/getinvolved/partners.htm.

Roger Williams National Memorial, Providence, Rhode Island https://www.nps.gov/rowi/index.htm (401) 521-7266 https://www.facebook.com/RogerWilliamsNPS

Roger Williams National Memorial commemorates the life of the founder of Rhode Island and a champion of the ideal of religious freedom. Williams, banished from Massachusetts for his beliefs, founded Providence in 1636. This colony served as a refuge where all could come to worship as their conscience dictated without interference from the state. Places to visit at the Memorial or nearby include the following: The Antram Gray House is an early 18th century structure with a late 18th century addition and serves as the visitor center for Roger Williams National Memorial. The Hahn Memorial is dedicated to Isaac Hahn, the first person of Jewish faith to be elected to public office from Providence, and designed by architect Norman M. Isham. Bernon Grove is a memorial to Gabriel Bernon, early Providence resident, founder of King’s Chapel (today, St. John’s Cathedral located across the street from the memorial), and owner of the lot containing the Roger Williams Spring. 17th Century Gardens: At Roger Williams National Memorial, there are two interpretive gardens: a Native American garden and a Colonial Kitchen garden. The Visitor Center features an exhibit and a short film, and there are also several exhibit panels throughout the 4.5 acre Memorial grounds. The National Memorial Visitor Center has access ramp to get wheeled chairs in from the street (put in place on a case by case situation). The restrooms in the Visitor Center are accessible. The memorial grounds have brick walkways that are accessible.

Touro Synagogue National Historic Site, Newport, Rhode Island https://www.nps.gov/tosy/index.htm (401) 847-4794 No Facebook connection found on website. Touro Synagogue, a building of exquisite beauty and design, steeped in history and ideals, and one of the most historically significant Jewish buildings in America, was designated a National Historic Site in 1946. The congregation was founded in 1658 by the descendants of Jewish families who fled the Inquisitions in Spain and Portugal and who themselves left the Caribbean seeking the greater religious tolerance that Rhode Island offered. Dedicated in 1763, it still serves an active congregation and each year greets over 30,000 visitors who come to see the magnificent interior and hear its remarkable story. Guided tours of the Touro Synagogue last approximately 30 minutes. During your tour, you will learn more about the history of the Synagogue, from its founding during colonial times up to the present day. In addition, the Loeb Visitors Center, adjacent to the Synagogue, contains additional exhibits about the history of the Synagogue and its role in helping to form the foundations of the ideal of Freedom of Religion enjoyed in the United States today. The Loeb Visitors Center is fully handicap accessible. However, the Synagogue is not fully accessible. Please call (401) 847-4794, ext. 207, for more information if you are interested in planning a visit to the Synagogue.
Washington-Rochambeau National Historic Trail (CT, DC, DE, MA, MD, NJ, NY, PA, RI, VA) https://www.nps.gov/waro/index.htm (215) 597-1581 https://www.facebook.com/Washington-Rochambeau-Revolutionary-Route-Natio...

In 1781, General Rochambeau’s French Army joined forces with General Washington’s Continental Army to fight the British Army in Yorktown, Virginia. With the French Navy in support, the allied armies moved hundreds of miles to become the largest troop movement of the American Revolution. The effort and cooperation between the two sides led to a victory at Yorktown and secured American independence. Rochambeau’s march north from July 1782 provided Americans an opportunity to give thanks to their country’s ally, for when the French infantry sailed out of Boston Harbor on Christmas Day 1782, King George III and Parliament had acknowledged the United States “to be free Sovereign and independent States.”

The Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historical Trail is over 680 miles of land and water trails that pass through nine states along the eastern coast of the United States. The trail’s large geographic presence serves to connect major metropolitan areas, national and state parks, historic and scenic trails, and countless other historic sites. Visitors can follow the route by exploring these different sites along the trail. Use the links on the website that listing each state to find sites that interpret the trail according to state. More information can also be found through our partner organization, the National Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Association, Inc. at W3R-US.org.

SOUTH CAROLINA

South Carolina became the first state to vote to secede from the Union on December 20, 1860. After the American Civil War, it was readmitted into the United States on June 25, 1868. South Carolina is named in honor of King Charles I of England, under whose reign the English colony was first formed, with Carolus being Latin for “Charles.” After the Civil War began, this area served as a Union base and staging point for other operations. Whites abandoned their plantations, leaving behind about 10,000 slaves. Several Northern charities partnered with the federal government to help these people run the cotton farms themselves under the Port Royal Experiment. Workers were paid by the pound harvested and thus became the first former slaves freed by the Union forces to earn wages. Early in the 20th century, South Carolina developed a thriving textile industry. Much of the Piedmont (an area lying at the base of mountains) was once farmed. Due to the changing economics of farming, much of the land is now reforested in Loblolly pine for the lumber industry. At the southeastern edge of the Piedmont is the fall line, where rivers drop to the coastal plain. The fall line was an important early source of water power. Mills built to harness this resource encouraged the growth of several cities, including the capital, Columbia. The larger rivers are navigable up to the fall line, providing a trade route for mill towns.

Major agricultural outputs of the state are: tobacco, poultry, cattle, dairy products, soybeans, hay, rice, and swine. Industrial outputs include: textile goods, chemical products, paper products, machinery, automobiles and automotive products and tourism. The service sector accounts for 83.7% of the South Carolina economy. Many large corporations have moved their locations to South Carolina, one of which is Boeing, an aircraft manufacturing facility. South Carolina is a right-to-work state and many businesses utilize staffing agencies to temporarily fill positions. This labor force is appealing to companies because of lower wages and no responsibility of maintaining healthcare benefits for its temporary employees. Since 1994, BMW, a foreign-owned company, has had a production facility in Spartanburg County near Greer. One of the nation’s major performing arts festivals, Spoleto Festival USA, is held annually in Charleston. When Italian organizers planned an American festival, they searched for a city that would offer the charm of Spoleto, Italy, and also its wealth of theaters, churches, and other performance spaces. Charleston was selected as an ideal location. South Carolina is also home to one of NASCAR’s first tracks and its first paved speedway, Darlington Raceway northwest of Florence.

South Carolina has 6 National Parks, 2 National Heritage Areas, 1 National Trail managed by the NPS, 76 National Historic Landmarks, and 6 National Natural Landmarks.

Riverbanks Zoo and Gardens riverbanks.org 803.779.8717 Email:[email protected]
Ripley’s Aquarium ripleyaquariums.com/myrtlebeach 843.916.0888 Email:[email protected]
Charles Pinkney National Historic Site, Mount Pleasant, South Carolina https://www.nps.gov/chpi/index.htm (843) 881-5516 https://www.facebook.com/PinckneyNPS/

Charles Pinckney was a principal author and a signer of the United States Constitution. This remnant of his coastal plantation is preserved to tell the story of a “forgotten founder,” his life of public service, the lives of enslaved African Americans on South Carolina Lowcountry plantations, and their influences on Charles Pinckney. The site is a 28-acre remnant of Charles Pinckney’s Snee Farm, a rice and indigo plantation that once fed the Charleston and International markets. The site is home to an 1828 Lowcountry coastal cottage that serves as a museum and Visitor Center. Park grounds boast ornamental gardens and towering canopies of live oak and Spanish moss. Exhibits tell the story of Charles Pinckney and his contributions to the U.S. Constitution, of the United States as a young and emerging nation, and of 18th century plantation life for free and enslaved people through the history of Snee Farm inhabitants. With the house as a backdrop, and because no physical structures from Pinckney ownership of the property remain, the National Park Service emphasizes discoveries from archeological investigations to tangibly connect the Pinckneys to Snee Farm and to provide evidence of the cultural environment that influenced Pinckney and the first decades of the United States as a young nation. Be sure to read the Safety Rules on the website if you plan to tour the grounds. The Visitor Center and comfort station are accessible by wheelchair.

Congaree National Park, Hopkins, South Carolina (803) 776-4396 https://www.nps.gov/cong/index.htm No Facebook connection found on website.

Astonishing biodiversity exists in Congaree National Park, the largest intact expanse of old growth bottomland hardwood forest remaining in the southeastern United States. Waters from the Congaree and Wateree Rivers sweep through the floodplain, carrying nutrients and sediments that nourish and rejuvenate this ecosystem and support the growth of national and state champion trees. Congaree National Park contains over 20,000 acres of federally designated wilderness that visitors can explore either by foot, kayak or canoe. Whether you are coming out for a short stroll on the boardwalk or taking a canoe trip down Cedar Creek, Congaree has a variety of ways for you to enjoy your visit to the park: Hiking, Canoeing and Kayaking, Fishing, Ranger-led Programs, and Camping.

Congaree National Park offers all visitors the opportunity to recreate and enjoy the solitude of wilderness. No roads travel through the park, and all activities require a certain amount of walking. While the majority of the park is unimproved, the area around the Harry Hampton Visitor Center is accessible to all visitors so that they are able to experience one of the last great old-growth forests in the country. Designated accessible parking spaces are available at the Harry Hampton Visitor Center. Restrooms located in the breezeway are fully accessible, as are the water fountains outside. The Visitor Center is fully accessible during our hours of operation. The information desk, gift shop and exhibits are all located on one level. The Boardwalk Trail starts from the Harry Hampton Visitor Center and loops 2.4 miles through a section of the old-growth bottomland forest. A self-guided brochure is available at the Visitors Center for use along the trail. The entire trail can be accessed by visitors with wheelchairs or strollers, including ramps to get to the elevated section. Please be aware that the boardwalk does at times shift and is not entirely level, and at times of flooding, some parts of the boardwalk may be inaccessible due to high water.

Cowpens National Battlefield, Gaffney, South Carolina https://www.nps.gov/cowp/index.htm (864) 461-2828 https://www.facebook.com/CowpensNationalBattlefield

A pasturing area at the time of the battle, this Revolutionary War site commemorates the place where Daniel Morgan and his army turned the flanks of Banastre Tarleton’s British army. This classic military tactic, known as a double envelopment, was one of only a few in history. (The envelopment is a maneuver in which a secondary attack attempts to hold the enemy’s center while both flanks (double envelopment) of the enemy are attacked or overlapped in a push to the enemy’s rear in order to threaten the enemy’s communications and line of retreat. This forces the enemy to fight in several directions and possibly be destroyed in position.) The Cowpens National Park has 3 main special events (Anniversary in January, Celebration of Freedom in July, and the Revolutionary War Weekend in October).

Trailhead Parking: At the corner of SC Highway 11 and Hayes Road, the parking lot is the trailhead for the Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail and provides additional pedestrian and bicycle access to Cowpens National Battlefield loop road and battlefield trail and is open until dusk. Battlefield Trail: The partially paved 1.3 mile trail includes wayside exhibits, the 1856 Washington Light Infantry Monument and the historic Green River Road which was the centerline of the battle. (45 minutes) Videos of Ed Bearss’ guided battlefield walk are available on the website. Auto Loop Road: The 3.8 mile 1 way road travels the perimeter of the battlefield and includes wayside exhibits, parking areas with short trails to the Green River Road, the c. 1828 Robert Scruggs Log House, and access to the picnic area. Audio narration by Ed Bearss. Picnic Area: Located 1 1/2 miles around the loop road, the area provides picnic tables, grills, and restroom facilities. Staff Ride: By definition, the staff ride is to be conducted by the military participants and not by park staff. See details about this event on the website.

Each of the major sites in the park is wheelchair accessible, and a wheelchair is available at the Visitor Center. Handicapped parking spaces are located immediately in front of the Visitor Center, picnic area, Scruggs House, and each of the battlefield overlooks. Restrooms are handicapped accessible.

SOUTH DAKOTA

Prairies and ranchland are common in central South Dakota. Mountains grace the western skyline, and in the southwest, striking Badlands formations rise abruptly from the surrounding prairie. The Missouri River runs through the central and southeastern part of the state. Lakes formed by retreating glaciers thousands of years ago cover the northeastern corner of South Dakota. Prairies and ranchland are common in central South Dakota. Mountains grace the western skyline, and in the southwest, striking Badlands formations rise abruptly from the surrounding prairie. The Missouri River runs through the central and southeastern part of the state. Lakes formed by retreating glaciers thousands of years ago cover the northeastern corner of South Dakota.

South Dakota is named after the Lakota and Dakota Sioux Native American tribes, who compose a significant portion of the population and historically dominated the entire territory. The U.S. acquired the region as part of the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, and it was explored by Lewis and Clark in 1804–1806. Fort Pierre, the first permanent settlement, was established in 1817, but settlement of South Dakota did not begin in earnest until the arrival of the railroad in 1873 and the discovery of gold in the Black Hills in 1874. In 1990, both houses of the U.S. Congress passed a resolution formally expressing “deep regret” for the Wounded Knee Massacre of Lakota Indians that occurred on December 29, 1890. The Black Hills are the highest mountains east of the Rockies. Mount Rushmore, in this group, is famous for the likenesses of Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln, and Theodore Roosevelt, which were carved in granite by Gutzon Borglum. A memorial to Crazy Horse is also being carved in granite near Custer. South Dakota has 6 National Parks, 1 Wild & Scenic River managed by the NPS, 1 National Trail managed by the NPS, 16 National Historic Landmarks, and 13 National Natural Landmarks.

Butterfly House and Marine Cove butterflyhousemarinecove.org 605.334.9466 Email:[email protected]
Falls Great Plains Zoo and Delbridge Museum of Natural History greatzoo.org 605.367.7003 Email:[email protected]
Badlands National Park, Interior, South Dakota https://www.nps.gov/badl/index.htm (605) 433-5361 No Facebook connection found on website.

The rugged beauty of the Badlands draws visitors from around the world. These striking geologic deposits contain one of the world’s richest fossil beds. Ancient mammals such as the rhino, horse, and saber-toothed cat once roamed here. The park’s 244,000 acres protect an expanse of mixed-grass prairie where bison, bighorn sheep, prairie dogs, and black-footed ferrets live today. From camping and hiking to bird watching and auto-touring, visitors to Badlands National Park can enjoy countless outdoor adventures: Drive the Badlands Highway 240 Loop Road; Stop at the Ben Reifel Visitor Center; Visit the Fossil Prep Lab; Hike a trail; Complete the Badlands GPS Adventure, or Go Camping and Explore the backcountry. See the website for details on each of these adventures.

The Ben Reifel Visitor Center and White River Visitor Center are both accessible to wheelchair users and provide ramped entrances, reserved parking, and accessible restrooms. A tactile experience is located in the exhibit area of the Ben Reifel Visitor Center, where visitors can touch and hold a selection of fossils and rocks. The Cedar Pass Campground has two campsites that are fully accessible by wheelchair and one accessible site in the group loop. These sites are designated for wheelchair users, but are available on a first-come, first-served basis. They may not be available, if the campground is full. The campground has many level sites, which can be negotiated by wheelchair users. Restrooms and the automated fee machine are accessible.

The Sage Creek Campground offers a rustic camping experience with no water available onsite. The area has accessible vault toilets, although the terrain in and around the campground can be rough. The Bigfoot Pass Picnic Area has reserved parking, ramps, and an accessible vault toilet. The Conata Picnic Area has an accessible vault toilet, but the terrain is rough. Most scenic overlooks and wayside exhibits are accessible to wheelchair users, many of which have recycled lumber or wooden boardwalks with gentle grades. The Fossil Exhibit and Window Trails are accessible boardwalks, as well as the first section of the Door and Cliff Shelf Trails. Ranger Programs held at the Cedar Pass Campground amphitheater are accessible by a paved, lighted path from reserved parking spaces in the parking lot. Evening presentations can be enjoyed from this location. Talks held at the Fossil Exhibit Trail, other overlooks, or the Ben Reifel Visitor Center are accessible to wheelchair users. However, ranger-led hikes or walks are generally not accessible due to the rugged badlands terrain. Reserved parking, ramps, wide doors, restrooms, and wide aisles make the Cedar Pass Lodge gift shop and dining room fully accessible.

Jewel Cave National Monument, Custer, South Dakota https://www.nps.gov/jeca/index.htm (605) 673-8300 https://www.facebook.com/JewelCaveNPS

Immerse yourself within the third longest cave in the world. With over 180 miles of mapped and surveyed passages, this underground wilderness appeals to human curiosity. Its splendor is revealed through fragile formations and glimpses of brilliant color. Its maze of passages lure explorers, and its scientific wealth remains a mystery.

The Monument offers one accessible cave tour option – the Discovery Talk, along with interactive exhibits and displays within the Visitor Center that complement ADA standards.

Parking/Visitor Center - There are five (5) accessible parking spaces available, which offer an accessible route from the parking lot to the ticket kiosk via a curb ramp. The parking lot contains van accessible parking spaces clearly identified by appropriate signage. The ramp (with railings) continues to the Visitor Center. Furthermore, the parking lot is paved and offers accessible sidewalks leading to all visitor use areas.

Parking/Jewel Cave Historic Area –There are two (2) accessible parking spaces available, which offer an accessible route from the parking lot to the historic cabin (not accessible to wheelchairs). If needed, vehicles with proper identification are also allowed to park near the visitor use area for loading and unloading purposes.

Restrooms/Visitor Center - Both the men’s and women’s restrooms are wheelchair accessible. The facilities offer ease of access to the restrooms through automatic swinging doors, operated by an easily accessed manual push button.

Restrooms/Jewel Cave Historic Area –The restrooms consist of vault toilets for both men and women, which are wheelchair access from the paved parking lot.

Trails –The Monument does not offer any wheelchair accessible trails. Although the trails are considered easy to moderate, each area is undeveloped or paved with loose gravel. In some areas, stairs are found along the pathways, and uneven terrains may be present. Interested hiking enthusiasts are encouraged to ask a park ranger for more information. The Historic Cabin is not wheelchair accessible, nor are the ranger-guided Historic Lantern Tours. The Monument offers one accessible programming option, called the Discovery Talk. This interpretive activity lasts about 20 to 30 minutes and takes participants into one large room of Jewel Cave. Visitors will learn about the natural and cultural history of the Monument, along with observing nailhead and dogtooth spar crystals. On this tour, participants have the option of walking down and back up 15 steps or staying on the first paved platform. This is the only programming option inside the cave that allows canes, crutches, walkers, and wheelchairs.

Visitors are encouraged to take part in a variety of ranger-led activities throughout the summer months. Interpretive patio talks occur each day near the Visitor Center from about mid-June through late August. Guided nature hikes are scheduled once each day and take place on the one-quarter mile Roof Trail near the visitor center. The patio talks are accessible by all audiences; the nature hikes are not wheelchair accessible. For an updated program schedule, ask a park ranger for additional information.

Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail (ID,IL,IA,KS,MO,MT,NE,ND,OR,SD,WA) https://www.nps.gov/lecl/index.htm 402) 661-1804 (Omaha, Nebraska) https://www.facebook.com/lewisandclarknht

Between May 1804 and September 1806, 31 men, one woman, and a baby traveled from the plains of the Midwest to the shores of the Pacific Ocean and back. They called themselves the Corps of Discovery. In their search for a water route to the Pacific Ocean, they opened a window into the west for the young United States. Sacagawea; May 1788–December 20, 1812; also Sakakawea or Sacajawea, was a Lemhi Shoshone woman who helped the Lewis and Clark Expedition achieve each of its chartered mission objectives exploring the Louisiana Purchase. Over two hundred years later, visitors can retrace the Expedition’s path by following the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Among the more than 100 sites along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail, only five are National Park Service sites. To learn more about sites along the Trail, visit the Basic Information page under the Plan Your Visit section on the website. The Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail Headquarters Visitor Center is a handicapped accessible site. Bathrooms and most displays are accessible to those who are mobility impaired. The interpretive film is also accessible, has open caption and full audio.

Mount Rushmore National Memorial, Keystone, South Dakota https://www.nps.gov/moru/index.htm (605) 574-2523 https://www.facebook.com/Mount-Rushmore-National-Memorial-146142078740561/

Majestic figures of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln, surrounded by the beauty of the Black Hills of South Dakota, tell the story of the birth, growth, development and preservation of this country. From the history of the first inhabitants to the diversity of America today, Mount Rushmore brings visitors face to face with the rich heritage we all share. Nearly three million people visit Mount Rushmore each year. The busiest months are June, July and August. May, September and October are less busy and popular months to visit as well. Located near the parking structure, the Information Center is the first stop for many visitors. A large sign outside provides information about the daily schedule, and park rangers inside can answer questions you may have about what to see and do. Lincoln Borglum Visitor Center: Located below the Grand View Terrace, this building houses two theaters, a museum and a Mount Rushmore Bookstore. The film, “Mount Rushmore, The Shrine,” is shown every 20 minutes in each theater. The museum exhibits tell the story of Gutzon Borglum, the creation of Mount Rushmore and the workers who helped. Sculptor’s Studio: Visit the place where Guzton Borglum worked from 1939 to 1941 and view the 1/12th scale model of Mount Rushmore. During the summer months, rangers present 15-minute talks here focusing on the workers who helped Borglum create Mount Rushmore and the tools and techniques they used.

Accessibility: Vehicles are able to unload mobility-impaired visitors in front of the main entryway and then park in the parking lot (fee area). Amphitheater and Guzton Borglum Visitor Center: Elevators are accessible from the Grand View Terrace to the museum lobby and Amphitheater. Depending on security issues, the Sculptor’s Studio is wheelchair accessible from the remote parking area. Check with the ranger in the Information Center. The Presidential Trail is surfaced to accommodate wheelchairs from the Grand View Terrace to viewing areas at the base of the mountain. The dining facility and gift shop are wheelchair accessible.

Wind Cave National Park, Hot Springs, South Dakota https://www.nps.gov/wica/index.htm (605) 745-4600 No Facebook connection found on website.

Bison, elk, and other wildlife roam the rolling prairie grasslands and forested hillsides of one of America’s oldest national parks. Below the remnant island of intact prairie sits Wind Cave, one of the longest and most complex caves in the world. Named for barometric winds at its entrance, this maze of passages is home to boxwork, a unique formation rarely found elsewhere. Boxwork is made of thin blades of calcite that project from cave walls and ceilings, forming a honeycomb pattern. The fins intersect one another at various angles, forming “boxes” on all cave surfaces. Success in viewing wildlife can be a challenge, but a little knowledge about the park’s diverse habitats makes that experience possible. Drive the park roads or hike the ridges, ravines, or trails that weave through the park. As you explore, look for the array of animals but also notice the assortment of habitats that support life in this remarkable national park. See the website for descriptions of likely habitats for each type of wildlife found at the park.

Wind Cave National Park offers a number of options to visitors with accessibility needs. The Visitor Center, cave, picnic area, and Elk Mountain Campground are accessible to all visitors, including visitors with limited mobility. Some facilities that are listed as accessible do not currently comply fully with standards due to the difficulty of working with historic buildings and limited space within the cave. However, we are constantly working to improve accessibility within the park. In the campground, sites B2 and D3 are fully accessible and are reserved for campers with accessibility needs. Limited areas of the cave are accessible to wheelchairs and folks with limited mobility. Please call ahead to make arrangements for an Accessible Cave Tour or ask at the park’s information desk for a special tour. There are fees charged for these services. Driving through or hiking in the park to view the diverse ecosystems and wildlife native to the American prairie is a delight for all visitors.

TENNESSEE

Tennessee was the last state to leave the Union and join the Confederacy at the outbreak of the American Civil War in 1861. Occupied by Union forces from 1862, it was the first state to be readmitted to the Union at the end of the war. Tennessee furnished more soldiers for the Confederate Army than any other state besides Virginia, and more soldiers for the Union Army than the rest of the Confederacy combined. Many major battles of the American Civil War were fought in Tennessee—most of them Union victories. Tennessee is known as the “Volunteer State,” a nickname some claimed was earned during the War of 1812 because of the prominent role played by volunteer soldiers from Tennessee. However, the more likely explanation is because President Polk’s call for 2,600 nationwide volunteers at the beginning of the Mexican-American War resulted in 30,000 volunteers from Tennessee alone, largely in response to the death of Davy Crockett and appeals by former Tennessee Governor and then Texas politician, Sam Houston.

During the administration of President Martin Van Buren, nearly 17,000 Cherokees—along with approximately 2,000 black slaves owned by Cherokees—were uprooted from their homes between 1838 and 1839 and were forced by the U.S. military to march from “emigration depots” in Eastern Tennessee (such as Fort Cass) toward the more distant Indian Territory west of Arkansas (now the state of Oklahoma). During this relocation, an estimated 4,000 Cherokees died along the way west. In the Cherokee language, the event is called Nunna daul Isunyi—”the Trail Where We Cried.” The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians is the only federally recognized Native American Indian tribe in the state. It owns 79 acres in Henning, which was placed into federal trust by the tribe in 2012. This is governed directly by the tribe.

In the early 1940s, the city of Oak Ridge was established to house the Manhattan Project’s uranium enrichment facilities, helping to build the world’s first atomic bomb, which was used during World War II. The planned community of Oak Ridge was built from scratch to provide accommodations for the facilities and workers. Tennessee leads the nation in the percentage of total tornadoes which have fatalities. The state has had major disasters, such as the Great Train Wreck of 1918, one of the worst train accidents in U.S. history, and the Sultana explosion on the Mississippi River near Memphis, the deadliest maritime disaster in U.S. history. Tourism contributes billions of dollars each year to the state’s economy and Tennessee is ranked among the Top 10 destinations in the U.S. Beale Street in Memphis is considered by many to be the birthplace of the blues, with musicians such as W.C. Handy performing in its clubs as early as 1909. Memphis is also home to Sun Records, where musicians such as Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins, Jerry Lee Lewis, Roy Orbison and Charlie Rich began their recording careers, and where rock and roll took shape in the 1950s. The 1927 Victor recording sessions in Bristol generally mark the beginning of the country music genre and the rise of the Grand Ole Opry in the 1930s helped make Nashville the center of the country music recording industry.

Tennessee has 12 National Parks, 1 National Heritage Area, 1 Wild & Scenic River managed by the NPS, 4 National Trails managed by the NPS, 30 National Historic Landmarks, 13 National Natural Landmarks, and 1 World Heritage Site.

Memphis Zoo memphiszoo.org 901.333.6500 Email:[email protected]
Tennessee Aquarium tnaqua.org 800.262.0695 Email:[email protected]
Appalachian National Scenic Trail (CT, GA, MA, MD, ME, NC, NH, NJ, NY, PA, TN, VA, VT, WV) https://www.nps.gov/appa/index.htm (304) 535-6278 (Harpers Ferry, WV) No Facebook connection found on home page.

Conceived in 1921, built by private citizens, and completed in 1937, today the Appalachian Trail is managed by the National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, numerous state agencies and thousands of volunteers. The Appalachian Trail is a 2,180+ mile long public footpath that traverses the scenic, wooded, pastoral, wild, and culturally resonant lands of the Appalachian Mountains from Georgia to Maine. The Appalachian National Scenic Trail does not currently have a visitor center. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy, a national not-for-profit corporation has a visitor center in Harpers Ferry, WV. The Appalachian Trail has been enjoyed by visitors with a variety of disabilities - including the blind, hearing-impaired, and hikers with a range of mobility limitations. The trail is not highly developed though, and there are only a few sections that are considered fully accessible.

Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park (GA, TN) https://www.nps.gov/chch/index.htm (706) 866-9241 https://www.facebook.com/chchnps ,p>In 1863, Union and Confederate forces fought for control of Chattanooga, known as the “Gateway to the Deep South.” The Confederates were victorious at nearby Chickamauga in September. However, renewed fighting in Chattanooga that November provided Union troops victory and control of the city. After the fighting, a Confederate soldier ominously wrote, “This...is the death-knell of the Confederacy.” Today the park encompasses more than 9,000 acres of battlefields, monuments, and forests, and urban landscapes. Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park consists of six distinct places through the greater Chattanooga area. The Visitor Center is accessible by wheelchair and has lots to do and see. They can also provide specifics about certain areas of the park that could be accessed by wheelchair. Basically, this is a very large park, and it is suggested that viewing is best from a vehicle if a wheelchair is required for mobility.

 

Cumberland Gap National Historical Park (KY, TN, VA) https://www.nps.gov/cuga/index.htm (606) 248-2817 https://www.facebook.com/CumberlandGapNHP/

The story of early pioneers; settlers and soldiers; pristine mountain streams; sights and sounds of wildlife; pastoral landscapes- all can be found while exploring Cumberland Gap National Historical Park. The park consists of approximately 24,000 acres, 85 miles of trails, camping, and lots to do and see! Start your park adventure at the visitor center. The park’s visitor center complex includes a museum, auditorium, sales areas and restrooms. All are accessible, allowing for wheelchair use. Designated parking allows easy access to the building. Chat with a ranger, visit the hands-on museum, pick up a park map, or purchase a book. Leaving the visitor center, park visitors can drive a winding four-mile-long road up to the Pinnacle Overlook (elevation 2,440 feet) for a spectacular view into Kentucky, Virginia, and Tennessee. A level 1/4-mile paved trail provides access to this overlook, from which visitors have a spectacular view into Kentucky, Tennessee, and Virginia. Accessible restrooms are located near the overlook. When park staff is available, shuttles to the Pinnacle Overlook can be arranged; cost is $5.00 per person. Accessible drive-in campsites are available at the park’s Wilderness Road Campground. Surfaces within these sites have been hardened, the height of fire grates has been increased, and picnic tables have been modified. Restrooms and showers are accessible and are family friendly for visitors with small children. A short, paved trail leads to the campground’s amphitheater, where park rangers present programs on the cultural and natural history of the park. Almost 85 miles of hiking trails meander through eastern deciduous forest in this 24,000 acre national park. Distances range from a 1/4mile loop trail to the 21-mile-long Ridge Trail.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park (NC, TN) https://www.nps.gov/grsm/index.htm (865) 436-1200 – Visitor Information Recorded Message https://www.facebook.com/GreatSmokyMountainsNPS

Ridge upon ridge of forest straddles the border between North Carolina and Tennessee in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. World renowned for its diversity of plant and animal life, the beauty of its ancient mountains, and the quality of its remnants of Southern Appalachian mountain culture, this is America’s most visited National Park. Much of the Smokies can be enjoyed from your vehicle and from accessible facilities and programs offered in the park. Activities range from viewing scenery to exploring the intricacies of the forest floor to learning about the resourceful people who made a living from this wilderness. For a wealth of information concerning the various Visitor Centers, historic structures, trails, etc. that can be toured, please see the following website: https://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm.

Manhattan Project National Historical Park (TN, NM, WA) https://www.nps.gov/mapr/index.htm (505) 661-6277 This phone number is for the Los Alamos Unit Visitor Center. You may also contact the Oak Ridge Unit Visitor Center at (865) 576-6767 or the Hanford Unit Visitor Center at (509) 376-1647 https://www.facebook.com/ManhattanProjectNPS/

This site tells the story about the people, events, science, and engineering that led to the creation of the atomic bomb, which helped end World War II. The Clinton Engineer Works, which became the Oak Ridge Reservation, was the administrative and military headquarters for the Manhattan Project and home to more than 75,000 people who built and operated the city and industrial complex in the hills of East Tennessee. The Oak Ridge Reservation included three parallel industrial processes for uranium enrichment and experimental plutonium production. Oak Ridge Reservation bus tour is included in the price of admission to the American Museum of Science and Energy, and includes a 3-hour tour of: X-10 Graphite Reactor, New Bethel Church at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, The visitor overlook at the East Tennessee Technology Park (former home to the K-25 gaseous diffusion building), and the Y-12 New Hope History Center. The tour runs March through November. Dates and times vary from week to week. Please contact the American Museum of Science & Energy for the latest information (Phone: (865) 576-3200; Email: [email protected]).

The National Park Service and the Department of Energy are working together to safely expand access to the facilities included in the park. Many of the facilities are industrial in nature and Department of Energy is working to improve accessibility to the sites open to the public. Virtualization efforts are underway at all three sites. Please call the site ahead of your visit to discuss accessible programs, services, and activities at the individual sites and request accommodations.

Natchez Trace Parkway (AL, MS, TN) https://www.nps.gov/natr/index.htm (800) 305-7417 https://www.facebook.com/NatchezTraceParkwayNPS

The Natchez Trace Parkway is a 444-mile drive through exceptional scenery and 10,000 years of North American history. Used by American Indians, “Kaintucks,” settlers, and future presidents, the Old Trace played an important role in American history. Today, visitors can enjoy not only a scenic drive but also hiking, biking, horseback riding, and camping. The Natchez Trace Parkway is a designated bicycle route. Whether you are traveling the parkway from Natchez to Nashville, or a section in between, here are a few of our favorite places...

“Sunken Trace at milepost 41.5. This stop gives you one of the iconic pictures from the Natchez Trace. Just a short five minute walk can send you back in time over 200 years. From this spot it is easy to imagine traveling the Old Natchez Trace by foot before the automobile.” ~ Ranger Andy

“Jeff Busby Little Mountain at milepost 193.1. Atop the summit, you can see the hills of Mississippi or follow the 1/2 mile loop down into to a shady hollow.” ~ Ranger Kathryn

“Buzzard Roost Spring at milepost 320.3. It is one of my favorite little-known stops. The Water from the spring is a vibrant almost opaque blue, and it’s a great spot to relax and listen to the water as is gushes forth from the earth.” ~ Ranger Jake

For more “places to go,” follow the links on the website divided by geographic sections from south to north (through Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee). Once in Tennessee, you will find more stops with both natural and historical significance, including the Old Trace Drive and beautiful waterfalls. There are numerous activities along the Natchez Trace Parkway that are accessible to people with varying abilities. From paved overlooks and trails, to visitor centers there are opportunities to get out of your car and experience the Parkway. See this website link for a list of 18 accessible facilities and features may help you plan your trip (https://www.nps.gov/natr/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm). In addition to the listed locations, each pullout along the Parkway has a routed sign that can be read from the vehicle. Interpretive signs at trailheads and parking areas are also wheelchair accessible.

National Historic Trail – Trail of Tears (AL, AR, GA, IL, KY, MO, NC, OK, TN) https://www.nps.gov/trte/index.htm (505) 988-6098 No Facebook listing was found.

Remember and commemorate the survival of the Cherokee people, forcefully removed from their homelands in Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee to live in Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail passes through the present-day states of Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Tennessee. A complete summary is set forth under the state of Alabama, one of the origins of the Trail.

Obed National Wild & Scenic River, Wartburg, Tennessee https://www.nps.gov/obed/index.htm (423) 346-6294 https://www.facebook.com/ObedNPS

The Obed Wild and Scenic River looks much the same today as it did when the first white settlers strolled its banks in the late 1700s. While meagerly populated due to poor farming soil, the river was a hospitable fishing and hunting area for trappers and pioneers. Today, the Obed stretches along the Cumberland Plateau and offers visitors a variety of outdoor recreational opportunities. The free-flowing Obed Wild & Scenic River and its 500-foot-deep gorges offer visitors unspoiled rugged terrain, exceptional waters, and outdoor adventure.

A variety of outdoor activities await you at the Obed Wild and Scenic River. Kayaking, canoeing, and rafting are popular seasonal activities. The 45 miles that comprise the river system includes whitewater runs that range from Class II to Class IV. Rock climbing and boulder climbing are also available at the park. For those who love to fish, the Obed is home to a variety of bass, bluegill, catfish, and muskie, among others. Obed Wild and Scenic River also offers several different hiking trails at varying lengths throughout the park. Camping is offered at Rock Creek Campground, and picnic benches and grills are provided at the Nemo Picnic Area.

The Obed Wild and Scenic River Visitor Center, located at 208 North Maiden Street in downtown Wartburg, is fully accessible, with handicapped parking available. The various trails and pathways to and around the river, however, should only be attempted by those in moderately good physical health. The exception to this is the Lilly Bluff Overlook Trail, which is on level ground and is handicapped accessible. Sturdy footwear is always recommended when touring the river.

TEXAS

Texas is the second largest state in the United States by both area and population, with the largest in area being Alaska. Texas is nicknamed the Lone Star State to signify its former status as an independent republic, and as a reminder of the state’s struggle for independence from Mexico. After a series of United States victories, the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ended the two-year Mexican-American war. In return, for U.S. $18,250,000, Mexico gave the U.S. undisputed control of Texas, ceded the Mexican Cession in 1848, most of which today is called the American Southwest, and Texas’s borders were established at the Rio Grande.

One Texan industry that thrived after the Civil War was cattle. The state now leads in many industries, including agriculture, petrochemicals, energy, computers, and electronics, aerospace, and biomedical sciences. Texas has led the nation in export revenue since 2002 and has the second highest gross state product. Texas emits the most greenhouse gases in the U.S. Causes of the state’s vast greenhouse gas emissions include the state’s large number of coal power plants and the state’s refining and manufacturing industries.

In 2010, Site Selection Magazine ranked Texas as the most business-friendly state in the nation, in part because of the state’s three-billion-dollar Texas Enterprise Fund (a business incentive fund created by legislation in 2003 that is used for ensuring the growth of business in Texas. One of Texas’s most competitive recruitment tools, these funds are used primarily to attract new business to the state or assist with the substantial expansion of an existing business as part of a competitive recruitment situation). Texas has the most farms and the highest acreage in the United States. The state is ranked #1 for revenue generated from total livestock and livestock products. It is ranked #2 for total agricultural revenue, behind California. Texas has known petroleum deposits of about 5 billion barrels, which makes up about one-fourth of the known U.S. reserves. The state is a leader in renewable energy commercialization; it produces the most wind power in the nation.

Houston is one of only five American cities with permanent professional resident companies in all of the major performing arts disciplines: the Houston Grand Opera, the Houston Symphony Orchestra, the Houston Ballet, and The Alley Theatre. Austin, The Live Music Capital of the World, boasts “more live music venues per capita than such music hotbeds as Nashville, Memphis, Los Angeles, Las Vegas or New York City.” Rice University in Houston is one of the leading teaching and research universities of the United States and is ranked the nation’s 17th-best overall university by U.S. News & World Report. Trinity University, a private, primarily undergraduate liberal arts university in San Antonio, has ranked first among universities granting primarily bachelor’s and select master’s degrees in the Western United States for 20 consecutive years by U.S. News. Due to the state’s large size and rough terrain, Texas has compensated by building both America’s largest highway and railway systems in length. The Port of Houston today is the busiest port in the United States in foreign tonnage, second in overall tonnage, and tenth worldwide in tonnage. Since 1911, Texas has led the nation in length of railroad miles within the state. The world’s first rodeo was hosted in Pecos, Texas. The annual Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo is the largest rodeo in the world. It begins with trail rides that originate from several points throughout the state that convene at Reliant Park.

Texas has 14 National Parks, 1 Wild & Scenic River managed by the NPS, 1 National Trail managed by the NPS, 46 National Historic Landmarks, 20 National Natural Landmarks, and 1 World Heritage Site.

Dallas Zoo dallaszoo.com 469.554.7500 Email:[email protected]
Fort Worth Zoo fortworthzoo.org 817.759.7555 Email:[email protected]
Texas State Aquarium texasstateaquarium.org 800.477.4853 Email:[email protected]
SeaWorld San Antonio seaworldparks.com 800.700.7786 Email:[email protected]
Houston Zoo www.houstonzoo.org/ (713) 533-6500 www.facebook.com/houstonzoo
Downtown Aquarium www.aquariumrestaurants.com/downtownaquariumhouston www.facebook.com/AquariumHouston (713) -223-3474
Alibates Flint Quarries National Monument, Fritch, Texas https://www.nps.gov/alfl/index.htm (806) 857-6680 https://www.facebook.com/alibatesflint

13,000 years ago this site was already well-known by mammoth hunters as a place to get the best stone for their tools. Centuries passed but the colorful flint found right here in the Texas panhandle never lost its value and usefulness. Visit and gain a sense of how integral this site was to the survival, commerce and culture of the High Plains. Archeological traces of prehistoric Indians’ homes, workshops, and campsites dot the entire Canadian River region of the Texas Panhandle, but few sites are as dramatic as Alibates Flint Quarries. Actually an agatized, or silicified, dolomite, the flint is distinctive for its many bright colors. This flint comes from a 10square-mile area around the monument, but most is concentrated on about 60 acres atop a mesa in the heart of the 1,000 acre monument. Upon close investigation of unassuming dolomite boulders, we see that one particular piece of dolomite has been carved onto, forming the shape of a turtle. These carvings, or petroglyphs (rock paintings are called pictographs), are believed to have been made by the Antelope Creek people who called this place home from 1100 A.D. to 1500 A.D. Petroglyphs can be found in many places throughout Alibates Flint Quarries National Monument, many of which can still be seen today during a ranger-guided hike to the village site. The Alibates Visitor Center offers a variety of activities for the whole family, including: Museum exhibits, Ranger-guided quarry tours, an 11-minute film about Alibates Flint Quarries National Monument, Flintknapping demonstrations, and a Teaching garden with native plants. The following facilities and destinations are accessible: Alibates Visitor Center, and Native Plants Garden and Picnic area next to Alibates Visitor Center.

Big Bend National Park, Big Bend National Park, Texas https://www.nps.gov/bibe/index.htm (432) 477-2251 https://www.facebook.com/BigBendNPS

There is a place in Far West Texas where night skies are dark as coal and rivers carve temple-like canyons in ancient limestone. Here, at the end of the road, hundreds of bird species take refuge in a solitary mountain range surrounded by weather-beaten desert. Tenacious cactus bloom in sublime southwestern sun, and diversity of species is the best in the country. This magical place is Big Bend. For visitors with high-clearance, four-wheel-drive vehicles Big Bend offers over one hundred miles of primitive dirt roads to explore. Things To Do: Ranger-led Programs, Backcountry Use, Backpacking, Bicycling, Bird-Watching, Day Hikes, Fishing, Horseback Riding, River Trips, Scenic Drives, and Stargazing.

Visitor Centers: Panther Junction Visitor Center has reserved parking and is accessible by ramp. The restrooms, exhibit area, bookstore, information desk, pay telephone, and drinking fountain are wheelchair-accessible. Chisos Basin Visitor Center has reserved parking and is accessible by ramp. The exhibits, restrooms, and drinking fountain are wheelchair-accessible. Persimmon Gap Visitor Center has reserved parking and is accessible by ramp. Exhibits, bookstore, restrooms, pay phone, and drinking fountain are wheelchair-accessible. Rio Grande Village Visitor Center has reserved parking and is accessible by ramp. The exhibit area, bookstore, audiovisual room, restrooms, and pay phone are designed for wheelchair-accessibility. Castolon Visitor Center has reserved parking and is accessible by ramp. The exhibits, bookstore, and restrooms are wheelchair-accessible.

Campgrounds: Cottonwood Campground at Castolon has wheelchair-accessible vault toilets. Although campsites are not accessible, some are level and useable by people in wheelchairs. Chisos Basin Campground site #37 is fully accessible for wheelchair users. The adjoining restroom is also accessible. Rio Grande Village Campground site #14 is fully accessible. The adjoining restroom is also accessible. During busy periods, designated accessible campsites are reserved for disabled campers until 6 p.m. If the campgrounds are full, an accessible site may not be available.

Picnic Areas: Dugout Wells Picnic Area has accessible tables and an accessible vault toilet. Panther Path, a short, self-guiding nature trail at Panther Junction, is rough, but level and useable by people in wheelchairs. An accompanying brochure explains Chihuahuan Desert plants.

Trails: Window View Trail, a 0.3 mile self-guiding trail in the Chisos Basin is fully accessible to wheelchairs, and provides outstanding views of the window formation and the Chisos Mountains. Rio Grande Village Nature Trail Boardwalk, the first 0.25 mile of the trail is wheelchair accessible. The trail is an excellent place for observing birds and aquatic plants and animals. A self-guiding booklet is available.

Vault Toilets: Vault toilets at the Boquillas Canyon, Santa Elena Canyon, and Hot Springs trailhead areas are accessible, although rugged terrain precludes wheelchairs on the trails. The Santa Elena Canyon river take-out also has wheelchair-accessible vault toilets.

There is much more information provided on the website at https://www.nps.gov/bibe/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm providing accessibility at programs, nature walks, scenic overlooks and wayside exhibits, concession facilities, outfitters (rafting companies that offer float trips for disabled visitors), and an aviation company (Rio Aviation Inc., Phone: 1-432-557-9477) that offers flights over Big Bend National Park and can accommodate individuals with disabilities.

Fort Davis National Historic Site, Fort Davis, Texas https://www.nps.gov/foda/index.htm (432) 426-3224 https://www.facebook.com/FortDavisNHS/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel

Fort Davis is one of the best surviving examples of an Indian Wars’ frontier military post in the Southwest. From 1854 to 1891, Fort Davis was strategically located to protect emigrants, mail coaches, and freight wagons on the Trans-Pecos portion of the San Antonio-El Paso Road and on the Chihuahua Trail. Self-guided tours of restored and refurnished buildings (see Park Brochure online); hiking (connecting with trails of adjacent Davis Mountain State Park); and a 15-minute video shown every half-hour. Pets on leash are permitted. It is the plan of the National Park Service, in partnership with the Friends of Fort Davis NHS, to restore and furnish the north ward and one or two of the administrative rooms. The restoration will enhance the visitor’s experience as well as increase the park’s ability to interpret the history of the entire garrison. Medical treatment at Fort Davis represented state- of- the- art medicine of the nineteenth century. The soldiers at Fort Davis and other frontier posts probably received medical treatment as good as or better than what the average American received at the time.

Begin your visit at the Visitor Center and museum and see the 15-minute video on the history of the fort. Take a self-guided tour of the five buildings that are restored and refurnished to the 1880s or explore the other 100 ruins and foundations. Interpreters dressed in period clothing are stationed at some of these buildings during the summer months and spring-break (mid-March). Follow the daily routine of a soldier as you listen to the bugle calls or journey back into time as the sound presentation of an 1875 dress retreat parade plays throughout the fort at scheduled times. Take a hike. Trails lead to a spectacular overlook of the fort and connect with trails of Davis Mountains State Park. Ask for a trail map in the Visitor Center or access one on the website.

Accessible parking spaces, restrooms, Visitor Center, park orientation video, and several historic buildings. Electric golf cart is available free of charge.

Padre Island National Seashore, Corpus Christi, Texas https://www.nps.gov/pais/index.htm (361) 949-8068 https://www.facebook.com/nps.pais

Padre Island National Seashore separates the Gulf of Mexico from the Laguna Madre, one of a few hypersaline lagoons in the world. The park protects 70 miles of coastline, dunes, prairies, and wind tidal flats teeming with life. It is a safe nesting ground for the Kemp’s ridley sea turtle and a haven for 380 bird species. It also has a rich history, including the Spanish shipwrecks of 1554. From 1804 to 1970, after the National Seashore opened in 1962, the island was used almost solely for ranching. The most prominent and lasting exceptions to this have been the development of the tourism industry (including the development of the town of South Padre Island and the National Seashore) beginning in the early 1920’s, and the exploitation of the island’s oil and natural gas reserves, which began in the 1950’s. One of the most interesting periods of the island’s history was from World War II to 1960, when a Navy bombing range existed on the northern section of the island.

All five of the sea turtle species found in the Gulf of Mexico find something they need at the park and in its adjacent waters. Kemp’s ridley sea turtles nest here more than at any other location in the U.S. Juvenile green sea turtles live in the waters here year-round, and adults nest on Padre Island in low numbers. Loggerhead sea turtles also nest in the park in low numbers and forage off shore. Leatherback sea turtles travel through the Gulf and historically nested here. Hawksbill sea turtles also travel through the area, finding food and rest along the way. All of these species are federally listed as either endangered or threatened. Padre Island National Seashore is the only location in Texas where nests from all five of these species have been found.

See the website for information about “Traveling Down Island” on the beach (a high clearance, four-wheel vehicle is required) and “Camping” at Padre Island National Seashore.

The Malaquite Visitor Center is accessible to all individuals. There are graded ramps to the Malaquite Visitor Center, picnic area, Malaquite Beach, and restroom facilities. The park orientation video and a video on the sea turtle program are available in either Spanish or English.

Five beach wheelchairs, designed for use in the soft sand of the beach, are available for free. To check out the wheelchair, leave a driver’s license or personal wheelchair at the visitor center until the wheelchair is returned. All wheelchairs must be returned by 4:30 p.m. that day. Beach wheelchairs are solely for use by mobility challenged visitors to access Malaquite Beach and may not be used as transport for belongings or for any other purpose. The weight capacity of the beach wheelchair is 350 lbs. The number of occupants in a beach wheelchair at ANY given time is to not exceed (1) one individual. The beach wheelchair is for use only on Malaquite Beach and cannot be transported by vehicle to a different beach area. Beach wheelchairs are not designed to float! Do not take them into deep water since they may tip over, resulting in serious injury or even death.

Waco Mammoth National Monument, Waco, Texas https://www.nps.gov/waco/index.htm (254) 750-7946 No Facebook connection found on website.

On July 10, 2015, President Barack Obama issued a Presidential Proclamation making the Waco Mammoth Site a new unit of the National Park System. This paleontological site represents the nation’s only recorded discovery of a nursery herd of Columbian mammoths. Visitors can view “in situ” fossils including female mammoths, a bull mammoth, and a camel that lived approximately 67,000 years ago. Waco Mammoth National Monument sits within 100 acres of wooded parkland along the Bosque River. Surrounded by oak, mesquite and cedar trees, the site offers an escape from the modern world and provides a glimpse into the lives and habitat of Columbian mammoths and other Ice Age animals.

On a spring day in 1978, Paul Barron and Eddie Bufkin embarked on a search for arrowheads and fossils near the Bosque River. To their surprise, the men stumbled upon a large bone eroding out of a ravine. Recognizing the unusual nature of the find, they removed the bone and took it to Baylor University’s Strecker Museum (predecessor to the Mayborn Museum Complex) for examination. Museum staff identified the find as a femur bone from a Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi). This now extinct species lived during the Pleistocene Epoch (more commonly known as the Ice Age) and inhabited North America from southern Canada to as far south as Costa Rica. Between 1978 and 1990, the fossil remains of 16 Columbian mammoths were discovered. Their efforts uncovered a nursery herd that appears to have died together in a single natural event. Between 1990 and 1997, six additional mammoths were excavated, including a large male (bull). Crews also uncovered the remains of a Western camel (Camelops hesternus), dwarf antelope, American alligator, giant tortoise, and the tooth of a juvenile saber-toothed cat (Smilodon sp.), which was found next to an unidentified animal. Since the discovery of the site in 1978, museum staff, students and volunteers have spent thousands of hours excavating and working to preserve the fossil material. While the remains excavated through 1990 are now housed at Baylor University’s Mayborn Museum Complex, most of the fossil specimens excavated since then remain in situ (still in their original position within the bone bed). These specimens have been protected in recent years by a climate-controlled Dig Shelter, allowing for both public viewing and further scientific study.

The entire facility is accessible via wheelchair and motorized scooter. If a member of your party needs assistance making the 300-yard walk to the dig shelter, we have wheelchairs available, and tour guides can carry up to 3 people in a golf cart, if necessary.

UTAH

In 2013, the U.S. Census Bureau estimated that Utah had the second fastest-growing population of any state. St. George was the fastest-growing metropolitan area in the United States from 2000 to 2005. Brigham Young and the first band of Mormon pioneers reached the Salt Lake Valley on July 24, 1847. Salt Lake City became the hub of a “far-flung commonwealth” of Mormon settlements. They developed irrigation to support fairly large pioneer populations along Utah’s Wasatch front (Salt Lake City, Bountiful and Weber Valley, and Provo and Utah Valley). Salt Lake City was the last link of the First Transcontinental Telegraph, completed in October 1861. Brigham Young was among the first to send a message, along with Abraham Lincoln and other officials. On May 10, 1869, the First Transcontinental Railroad was completed at Promontory Summit, north of the Great Salt Lake. The railroad brought increasing numbers of people into the territory and several influential businesspeople made fortunes there. The “1890 Manifesto” (also known as the “Woodruff Manifesto” or the “Anti-polygamy Manifesto”) is a statement which officially advised against any future plural marriage in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (LDS Church). Issued by church president Wilford Woodruff in September 1890, the Manifesto was a response to mounting anti-polygamy pressure from the United States Congress, which by 1890 had disincorporated the church, escheated its assets to the U.S. federal government, and imprisoned many prominent polygamist Mormons. Upon its issuance, the LDS Church in conference accepted Woodruff’s Manifesto as “authoritative and binding.” When Utah applied for statehood again, it was accepted. One of the conditions for granting Utah statehood was that a ban on polygamy be written into the state constitution. This was a condition required of other western states that were admitted into the Union later. Statehood was officially granted on January 4, 1896.

Beginning in the early 20th century, with the establishment of such national parks as Bryce Canyon National Park and Zion National Park, Utah became known for its natural beauty. Southern Utah became a popular filming spot for arid, rugged scenes featured in the popular mid-century western film genre. Since the establishment of the Alta Ski Area in 1939 and the subsequent development of several ski resorts in the state’s mountains, Utah’s skiing has become world-renowned. Salt Lake City won the bid for the 2002 Winter Olympic Games, and this served as a great boost to the economy. After early financial struggles and scandal, the 2002 Olympics eventually became among the most successful Winter Olympics in history from a marketing and financial standpoint. Watched by over 2 billion viewers, the Games ended up with a profit of $100 million. The ski resorts have increased in popularity, and many of the Olympic venues built along the Wasatch Front continue to be used for sporting events. Former Olympic venues including Utah Olympic Park and Utah Olympic Oval are still in operation for training and competition and allow the public to participate in numerous activities including ski jumping, bobsleigh, and speed skating.

According to the 2007 State New Economy Index, Utah is ranked the top state in the nation for Economic Dynamism, determined by “the degree to which state economies are knowledge-based, globalized, entrepreneurial, information technology-driven and innovation-based.” In 2014, Utah was ranked number one in Forbes’ list of “Best States For Business.” In terms of “small business friendliness,” in 2014 Utah emerged as number one, based on a study drawing upon data from over 12,000 small business owners. Today mining activity still plays a major role in the state’s economy. Minerals mined in Utah include copper, gold, silver, molybdenum, zinc, lead, and beryllium. Fossil fuels including coal, petroleum, and natural gas continue to play a large role in Utah’s economy, especially in the eastern part of the state. The Bingham Canyon Mine in Salt Lake County is one of the largest open pit mines in the world.

Utah granted full voting rights to women in 1870, 26 years before becoming a state. Among all U.S. states, only Wyoming granted suffrage to women earlier. However, in 1887 the initial Edmunds-Tucker Act was passed by Congress. One of the provisions of the Act was the repeal of women’s suffrage; full suffrage was not returned until Utah was admitted to the Union in 1896. Utah is one of the 15 states that have not ratified the U.S. Equal Rights Amendment. Utah is one of few states to set a smoking age of 19, as opposed to 18, as in most other states. Utah is also one of only two states in the United States to outlaw all forms of gambling; the other is Hawaii. Utah is the setting of or the filming location for many books, films, television series, music videos, and video games.

Utah has 13 National Parks, 2 National Heritage Areas, 1 Wild & Scenic River managed by the NPS, 4 National Trails managed by the NPS, 14 National Historic Landmarks, and 4 National Natural Landmarks.

Hogle Zoo hoglezoo.org/utahs-hogle-zoo-accessibility-information/. 801.584.1700 The Zoo does not have an email address for publication.
The Loveland Living Planet thelivingplanet.com 801.355.3474 Email:[email protected]
Arches National Park, Moab, Utah https://www.nps.gov/arch/index.htm (435) 719-2299 https://www.facebook.com/ArchesNPS

Visit Arches and discover a landscape of contrasting colors, landforms and textures unlike any other in the world. The park has over 2,000 natural stone arches, in addition to hundreds of soaring pinnacles, massive fins and giant balanced rocks. This red rock wonderland will amaze you with its formations, refresh you with its trails, and inspire you with its sunsets. The park can be crowded during the busy season. Read about current conditions in the park so you know what to expect during your visit. Hydration is essential in the desert, even in winter. Drink 1 gallon of water per day. Refill at the Visitor Center or Devils Garden. Ranger programs resume in spring 2017. Things To Do: Auto Touring, Backpacking, Biking, Camping, Commercial Tours, Hiking, Horseback Riding, Photography, Ranger-led Programs, Rock Climbing, and Stargazing.

The following facilities and destinations are ADA-compliant: ● Arches Visitor Center ● Restrooms throughout the park ● Devils Garden Campground site #4H ● Park Avenue Viewpoint ● Balanced Rock Viewpoint and Picnic Area ● Wolfe Ranch Cabin and rock art panel ● Delicate Arch Viewpoint

The following trails are considered barrier-free*: ● Devils Garden Trail (to Landscape Arch) ● Windows Trail (first 100 yards only) ● Double Arch Trail * Barrier-free trails may contain minor obstacles, steeper grades and temporary washouts.

Use the “Site Index” found on the home page of the website (under “Tools” at the bottom of the page) to access information about all of the facilities and destinations located at the Arches National Park. If you still have questions about accessibility for special needs individuals, please contact the park.

California National Historic Trail (CA, CO, ID, KS, MO, NE, NV, OR, UT, WY) https://www.nps.gov/cali/index.htm (801) 741-1012 https://www.facebook.com/oregoncalifornianps

Between 1841 and 1869, more than a quarter million people answered this call and crossed the plains and mountains to the West. These emigrants started their journeys in Kansas and Missouri, walking more than 2,000 miles for months in pursuit of a better life. The California and Oregon Trails follow the same route until Idaho, where they diverge, the Oregon Trail turning north to Oregon and the California Trail heading to California. A complete summary is set forth under the state of California, the final destination of the trail.

Capital Reef National Park, Torrey, Utah https://www.nps.gov/care/index.htm (435) 425-3791 https://www.facebook.com/CapitolReefNPS

Located in south-central Utah in the heart of red rock country, Capitol Reef National Park is a hidden treasure filled with cliffs, canyons, domes and bridges in the Waterpocket Fold, a geologic monocline (a wrinkle on the earth) extending almost 100 miles. Find out about the geologic processes that created the Waterpocket Fold. Learn more about our trails and routes for hiking and backpacking. Capitol Reef has several camping opportunities to choose from. Join a ranger to discover more about the wonders of Capitol Reef National Park. Apply by April 5, 2017 for our 2017 Artist in Residence program. Historic orchards contain over 2,700 trees including cherry, apricot, peach, pear, apple, plum, mulberry, almond and walnut. Capitol Reef National Park was designated a Gold Tier “International Dark Sky Park” by the International Dark-Sky Association.

Upon arrival, stop by the park Visitor Center for current information on everything from road conditions to hiking trails, camping and ranger-led programs, and to pick up a copy of the Park Map. Rangers and volunteers are available to answer questions and provide information regarding all aspects of Capitol Reef National Park. Capitol Reef National Park offers experiences for everyone, including those with accessibility needs. Much of the park can be enjoyed from your vehicle by taking the Scenic Drive, Cathedral Valley Loop, Notom-Bullfrog Road, and Burr Trail.

The Visitor Center is accessible to wheelchair users and provides a ramped entrance, reserved parking, and accessible restrooms. The 18-minute orientation movie is accessible and closed captioned for those with hearing impairments. The Fruita Campground has five campsites that are fully accessible by wheelchair. These sites are designated for wheelchair users, but are available on a first-come, first-served basis and may not be available if the campground is full. The Picnic Area along the Scenic Drive has reserved parking and an accessible vault toilet. Many scenic overlooks and wayside exhibits are accessible to wheelchair users. The petroglyphs along Utah Highway 24 are accessible by boardwalk. The Petroglyph Panel, Fruita Schoolhouse, and Merin-Smith Implement Shed are accessible and feature audio guides. Programs held at the Fruita Campground Amphitheater are accessible by a paved, lighted path from reserved parking spaces in the parking lot. Evening presentations can be enjoyed from this location. Talks held at the Visitor Center, Ripple Rock Nature Center, Petroglyph Panel, or other overlooks, are accessible to wheelchair users. However, ranger-led hikes or walks are generally not accessible due to the rugged terrain. Check at the Visitor Center or call the park for additional information on accessibility.

Dinosaur National Monument (Vernal, Utah and Dinosaur, Colorado) https://www.nps.gov/dino/index.htm (435) 781-7700 https://www.facebook.com/DinosaurNPS

Dinosaurs once roamed here. Their fantastic remains are still visible embedded in the rocks. Today, the mountains, desert and untamed rivers flowing in deep canyons, support an array of life. Petroglyphs hint at earlier cultures. Later, homesteaders and outlaws found refuge here. Whether your passion is science, adventure, history or scenery, Dinosaur offers much to explore. The Quarry Exhibit Hall, located over the world-famous Carnegie Dinosaur Quarry, is open! The Quarry Exhibit Hall allows visitors to view the wall of approximately 1,500 dinosaur bones in a refurbished, comfortable space. Here, you can gaze upon the remains of numerous different species of dinosaurs including Allosaurus, Apatosaurus, Camarasaurus, Diplodicus, and Stegosaurus along with several others. Exhibits, including an 80-foot long mural, reveal the story of these animals and many others that lived in the Morrison environment during the late Jurassic. There are even several places where you can touch real 149 million year old dinosaur fossils! Rangers are available to answer questions and occasionally give Junior Ranger programs or talks on different topics related to the quarry or dinosaurs throughout the day during the summer. To access the Quarry Exhibit Hall, first stop at the Quarry Visitor Center located approximately 1/4 mile from the exhibit hall. Depending on the time of year, access may be by shuttle bus or by your personal vehicle.

The following facilities and destinations are ADA-compliant:

Quarry Visitor Center

Reserved parking spaces are available with accessible walkways to the visitor center. The facility has accessible restrooms. Listening assistance devices are available for the monument film.

Quarry Exhibit Hall

Visitors with accessibility needs may drive their personal vehicle to the Quarry Exhibit Hall. Ask at the visitor center information desk for directions. The Exhibit Hall is accessible through a system of ramps. A wheelchair is available to borrow.

Canyon Area Visitor Center

Reserved parking spaces are available with accessible walkways leading to the Canyon Area Visitor Center. The exhibits, bookstore, and restrooms are accessible.

Campground and Picnic Areas

Accessible campsites and restrooms are available at the Green River and Echo Park campgrounds. Most campsites at other campgrounds have accessible picnic tables, but the area is unpaved. Accessible picnic areas are available at the Plug Hat, Canyon Overlook, and Harpers Corner. Most picnic sites at other locations have accessible picnic tables, but the area is unpaved.

Overlooks and Trails

Overlooks along the Harpers Corner Scenic Drive are accessible. The Plug Hat Trail is accessible (places along the trail are near drop-offs with no intervening rims or rails). There are short, paved trails at Iron Springs Overlook and Echo Park Overlook.

There is more to see here beyond the amazing fossils. Go whitewater rafting and star gazing. Explore mountains and canyons. Watch wildlife and photograph wildflowers. Contemplate historic cabins and Fremont rock art. Dinosaur offers countless opportunities for discovery, and we hope you will have fun, make lifelong memories, and develop a deep connection to this special place. The “Plan Your Visit” section has all kinds of helpful tips about things to do, places to go, eating and sleeping, and current conditions. See the following link (https://www.nps.gov/dino/planyourvisit/placestogo.htm) for more information.

Hovenweep National Monument (CO, UT) https://www.nps.gov/hove/index.htm (970) 562-4282, ext. 10 (Colorado phone number) https://www.facebook.com/HovenweepNPS

Once home to over 2,500 people, Hovenweep includes six prehistoric villages built between A.D. 1200 and 1300. Hovenweep National Monument protects six prehistoric, Puebloan-era villages spread over a twenty-mile expanse of mesa tops and canyons along the Utah-Colorado border. Multi-storied towers perched on canyon rims and balanced on boulders lead visitors to marvel at the skill and motivation of their builders. The construction and attention to detail will leave you marveling at the skill and motivation of the builders. Our Artist in the Parks program connects local artists to the inspiring landscapes of national parks and monuments in southeast Utah. Learn more about sites at Cajon, Cutthroat Castle, Holly, Horseshoe & Hackberry, and Square Tower by clicking on their names in the map on the website at (https://www.nps.gov/hove/planyourvisit/placestogo.htm ).

The following facilities and destinations are ADA-compliant:

Hovenweep Visitor Center, Restrooms throughout the park, one table at the picnic area, one campsite in the campground, and Square Tower Group Trail from the visitor center to the first overlook.

NOTE: Do not use GPS to find your way. There are numerous paved and dirt roads intersecting each other in this remote corner of Utah. The Hovenweep Visitor Center is located 40-45 miles from Cortez, Colorado, and Blanding and Bluff, Utah. Follow driving directions on our webpage (https://www.nps.gov/hove/planyourvisit/basicinfo.htm).

Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail (IA, IL, NE, UT, WY) https://www.nps.gov/mopi/index.htm (801) 741-1012 (Utah) Not available

Explore the Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail across five states to see the route 70,000 Mormons traveled from 1846 to 1869 to escape religious persecution. The Pioneer Company of 1846-1847 established the first route from Nauvoo, Illinois, to Salt Lake City, Utah, covering about 1,300 miles. We recommend contacting the nearest visitors and convention bureau to where you plan to visit for each day you are traveling along the trail or contact the individual sites or parks directly. Some sites may provide accessible trails or pathways for touring an area. National Park Service Auto Tour Route guides provide detailed information to help you plan your visit. The Trip Itineraries page on the website offers state or regional trips - come back to this page often as we amass more trip itineraries for you. Use these resources to plan your visit to the Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail. Go to Places to Go for an interactive map with trail sites and a list of sites by state (https://www.nps.gov/mopi/planyourvisit/index.htm).

Pony Express National Historic Trail (CA, CO, KS, MO, NE, NV, UT, WY) https://www.nps.gov/poex/index.htm (801) 741-1012 (NM; office of National Trails Intermountain Region) https://www.facebook.com/PonyExpressNPS

It is hard to believe that young men once rode horses to carry mail from Missouri to California in the unprecedented time of only 10 days. This relay system along the Pony Express National Historic Trail in eight states was the most direct and practical means of east-west communications before the telegraph. Trip planning along the trail can be challenging given the vast number of land jurisdictions the trail passes through. We recommend contacting the nearest visitors and convention bureau to where you plan to visit for each day you are traveling along the trail or contact the individual sites or parks directly. Our Auto Tour Route guides provide detailed information to help you plan your visit. The Trip Itineraries page offers state or regional trips - come back to this page often as we amass more trip itineraries for you. Use these resources to plan your visit to the Pony Express National Historic Trail; see the following website for more information (https://www.nps.gov/poex/planyourvisit/index.htm).

VERMONT

As of 2015, Vermont continued to be the leading producer of maple syrup in the U.S. It was ranked as the safest state in the country in January 2016. Vermont was also the first state to join the U.S. as its 14th member state after the original 13. While still an independent republic, Vermont was the first of any future U.S. state to partially abolish slavery. It played an important geographic role in the Underground Railroad. On July 4, 1777, Dr. Thomas Young and Ethan Allen completed the drafting of the Constitution of Vermont at the Windsor Tavern, and adopted it on July 8. This was the first written constitution in North America to ban adult slavery, saying male slaves became free at the age of 21 and females at 18. Slavery was fully banned by state law on November 25, 1858, less than three years before the American Civil War. Vermont approved women’s suffrage decades before it became part of the national constitution. Women were first allowed to vote in the elections of December 18, 1880, when women were granted limited suffrage (right to vote).

Forest products have always been a staple to the economy comprising 1% of the total gross state output and 9% of total manufacturing as of 2013. In 2007, Windham County contained the largest concentration of kilns for drying lumber east of the Mississippi River. The decline of farms has resulted in a regrowth of Vermont’s forests due to ecological succession. The state’s share of the nation’s maple products production rose to 42% in 2013. It had the second lowest price at $33.40/gallon.

Tourism is an important industry to the state. Some of the largest ski areas in New England are located in Vermont. Resorts, hotels, restaurants, and shops, designed to attract tourists, employ people year-round. Summer camps contribute to Vermont’s tourist economy. According to the 2000 Census, almost 15% of all housing units in Vermont were vacant and classified “for seasonal, recreational, or occasional use.” This was the second highest percentage nationwide, after Maine. The towns of Rutland and Barre are the traditional centers of marble and granite quarrying and carving in the U.S. The first marble quarry in America was on Mount Aeolus overlooking East Dorset. The granite industry attracted numerous skilled stonecutters in the late 19th century from Italy, Scotland, and Ireland. Barre is the location of the Rock of Ages quarry, the largest dimension stone granite quarry in the United States. Vermont is the largest producer of slate in the country. In 2011 Vermont residents were ranked as the healthiest in the country.

Vermont has 1 National Park, 1 National Heritage Area, 1 Wild & Scenic River managed by the NPS, 1 National Trail managed by the NPS, 18 National Historic Landmarks, and 12 National Natural Landmarks.

Echo Lake Aquarium and Science Center echovermont.org 802.864.1848 Email:[email protected]
Appalachian National Scenic Trail (CT, GA, MA, MD, ME, NC, NH, NJ, NY, PA, TN, VA, VT, WV) https://www.nps.gov/appa/index.htm (304) 535-6278 (Harpers Ferry, WV) No Facebook connection found on home page.

Conceived in 1921, built by private citizens, and completed in 1937, today the Appalachian Trail is managed by the National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, numerous state agencies and thousands of volunteers. The Appalachian Trail is a 2,180+ mile long public footpath that traverses the scenic, wooded, pastoral, wild, and culturally resonant lands of the Appalachian Mountains from Georgia to Maine. The Appalachian National Scenic Trail does not currently have a visitor center. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy, a national not-for-profit corporation has a visitor center in Harpers Ferry, WV. The Appalachian Trail has been enjoyed by visitors with a variety of disabilities - including the blind, hearing-impaired, and hikers with a range of mobility limitations. The trail is not highly developed though, and there are only a few sections that are considered fully accessible.

Marsh–Billings–Rockefeller National Historic Park, Woodstock, Vermont https://www.nps.gov/mabi/index.htm (802) 457-3368, ext. 222 https://www.facebook.com/Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller-National-Historical-...

“The forest and fields in their white winter cloak are a place of magic and sublime beauty.” Grab your skis or snowshoes and adventure along the park’s groomed ski trails and natural back-country trails. Ski passes are required for the groomed trails - available from the Woodstock Nordic Center. Check out our winter weekend programs to learn about the snowy inhabitants and history of this storied landscape. At Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park, you can explore 555 acres of forest, tour a mansion that was home to three conservationist families across nearly 200 years, and contribute your voice to an ongoing conversation about what it means to be a steward of the land.

Things to Do: From exploring the country’s oldest sustainably managed forest, to touring the Mansion that three prominent conservation families called home, our staff of rangers are eager to share with you the captivating stories that characterize this unique place. We offer at least four different tours each day – whether you are a long-time resident or first-time visitor, we invite you to join us and discover something new at Vermont’s only national park site. Built in 1895 and rehabilitated in 1999, the Carriage Barn serves as the national park’s Visitor Center. Features include: People Taking Care of Places, an exhibit on conservation history; Visitor reading library; Self-guided maps and activity brochures for those with limited time, and a bookstore. Visit with park rangers, schedule a tour, learn about hiking opportunities, or just relax and read a book!

Informative, hands-on and exciting workshops for the woodland enthusiast. Working Woodlands Workshops are held throughout the year at Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park. Come learn from forestry professionals, scientists, and landowners and inspiring community members. Explore diverse topics ranging from tree identification, low-impact harvesting, sawmilling, Timber Stand Improvement, animal tracking, trail maintenance, invasive plant control and so much more. Learn techniques and knowledge to help understand, manage and conserve and experience woodlands. To learn more about Working Woodlands Workshops, contact Christine Frohloff at 802/457-3368, ext. 222, or email [email protected] or visit Working Woodlands Workshops (link available on website).

Walk through one of Vermont’s most beautiful landscapes, under the shade of sugar maples and 400-year-old hemlocks, along winding woodland carriage roads and trails. On the gentle slopes of Mount Tom you will find mountain pastures, a mysteriously-named pond, and spectacular views of nearby hills and valleys.

Special tours and events are held throughout the season. Conservation through the Artist’s Eye showcases paintings that tell the story of conservation history and land stewardship in America. Take a self-guided tour: Causes and Consequences: The Civil War Home Front in Woodstock, Vermont, and discover places associated with the Underground Railroad, abolition meetings, the town’s free African-American community, and Woodstock’s pivotal role in Vermont’s war effort. Other tours include The Formal Garden and Beyond, Hidden Spaces, Unique Places, and Green Infrastructure: Explore the Park’s Sustainable Future.

Public parking for disabled persons is available at the Billings Farm & Museum parking area. For visitors taking guided tours at the national park, a special pass may be obtained at the National Park Service desk in the Billings Farm & Museum Visitor Center in order to park within close proximity to the Mansion and Carriage Barn Visitor Center. Both facilities are wheelchair accessible. Please ask park staff for assistance. For further information, please call the park.

VIRGINIA

Virginia is nicknamed the “Old Dominion” due to its status as the first colonial possession established in mainland British America, and “Mother of Presidents” because eight U.S. presidents were born there, more than any other state. The Virginia General Assembly is the oldest continuous law-making body in the New World. In 1619, colonists took greater control with an elected legislature called the House of Burgesses established in Jamestown. The largest areas of wilderness are along the Atlantic coast and in the western mountains, where the largest populations of trillium wildflowers in North America are found. “Middle Plantation” saw the founding of The College of William & Mary in 1693 and was renamed “Williamsburg” as it became the colonial capital in 1699. After the House of Burgesses was dissolved by the royal governor in 1774, Virginia’s revolutionary leaders continued to govern via the Virginia Conventions. On May 15, 1776, the Convention declared Virginia’s independence from the British Empire and adopted George Mason’s Virginia Declaration of Rights, which was then included in a new constitution. Another Virginian, Thomas Jefferson, drew upon Mason’s work in drafting the national Declaration of Independence. In 1781, the combined action of Continental and French land and naval forces trapped the British army on the Virginia Peninsula, where troops under George Washington and Comte de Rochambeau defeated British General Cornwallis in the Siege of Yorktown. His surrender on October 19, 1781, led to peace negotiations in Paris and secured the independence of the colonies.

During the Civil War, more battles were fought in Virginia than anywhere else, including Bull Run, the Seven Days Battles, Chancellorsville, and the concluding Battle of Appomattox Court House. Virginian James Albert Bonsack invented the tobacco cigarette rolling machine in 1880 leading to new industrial scale production centered on Richmond. In 1886, railroad magnate Collis Potter Huntington founded Newport News Shipbuilding, which was responsible for building six major World War I era battleships for the U.S. Navy from 1907 to 1923. In 1926, Dr. W.A.R. Goodwin, rector of Williamsburg’s Bruton Parish Church, began restoration of colonial-era buildings in the historic district with financial backing of John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Though their project, like others in the state, had to contend with the Great Depression and World War II, work continued as Colonial Williamsburg became a major tourist attraction.

Prince William County is both the fastest-growing county in Virginia and has the highest median household income ($114,204) in the country as of 2010. The Hampton Roads area has the largest concentration of military personnel and assets of any metropolitan area in the world, including the largest naval base in the world, Naval Station Norfolk. Virginia has the highest concentration of technology workers of any state. Though agriculture has declined significantly since 1960 when there were twice as many farms, it remains the largest single industry in Virginia.

The Barter Theatre, designated the State Theatre of Virginia, in Abingdon won the first ever Regional Theatre Tony Award in 1948, while the Signature Theatre in Arlington won it in 2009. There’s also a Children’s Theater of Virginia, Theatre IV, which is the second largest touring troupe nationwide. Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts is located in Vienna and is the only national park intended for use as a performing arts center. On the Eastern Shore island of Chincoteague, the annual Pony Swim & Auction of feral Chincoteague ponies at the end of July is a unique local tradition expanded into a week-long carnival. The Old Time Fiddlers’ Convention in Galax, begun in 1935, is one of the oldest and largest such events worldwide. The paper with the nation’s widest circulation, USA Today, with 1.83 million daily subscriptions, is headquartered in McLean. In the U.S. News & World Report ranking of public colleges, the University of Virginia is second, The College of William & Mary is sixth, and Virginia Tech is 25th. Virginia Commonwealth University is ranked the top public graduate school in fine arts, while James Madison University has been recognized as the top regional public master’s program in the South since 1993. The Virginia Military Institute is the oldest state military college and a top ranked public liberal arts college. The Virginia Capitol Police is the oldest police department in the United States.

Virginia has 22 National Parks, 2 National Heritage Areas, 5 National Trails managed by the NPS, 121 National Historic Landmarks, 10 National Natural Landmarks, and 1 World Heritage Site.

Virginia Safari Park virginiasafaripark.com 540.291.3205 Email:[email protected]
Virginia Aquarium and Marine Science Center virginiaaquarium.com 757.385.3474 Email:[email protected]
Appalachian National Scenic Trail (CT, GA, MA, MD, ME, NC, NH, NJ, NY, PA, TN, VA, VT, WV) https://www.nps.gov/appa/index.htm (304) 535-6278 (Harpers Ferry, WV) No Facebook connection found on home page.

Conceived in 1921, built by private citizens, and completed in 1937, today the Appalachian Trail is managed by the National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, numerous state agencies and thousands of volunteers. The Appalachian Trail is a 2,180+ mile long public footpath that traverses the scenic, wooded, pastoral, wild, and culturally resonant lands of the Appalachian Mountains from Georgia to Maine. The Appalachian National Scenic Trail does not currently have a visitor center. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy, a national not-for-profit corporation has a visitor center in Harpers Ferry, WV. The Appalachian Trail has been enjoyed by visitors with a variety of disabilities - including the blind, hearing-impaired, and hikers with a range of mobility limitations. The trail is not highly developed though, and there are only a few sections that are considered fully accessible.

Appomattox Court House National Historical Park, Appomattox, Virginia https://www.nps.gov/apco/index.htm (434) 352-8987, ext. 226 https://www.facebook.com/AppomattoxNPS

On April 9, 1865, the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia in the McLean House in the village of Appomattox Court House, Virginia signaled the end of the nation’s largest war. Two important questions about its future were answered. Could the nation survive a civil war intact, and would that nation exist without slavery? The answer to both was yes and a new nation was born. Gen. Lee’s decision to surrender was the product of eight day campaign that ended at Appomattox Court House. Once Gen. Lee made the decision to surrender, learn how the terms were agreed to once he met Gen. Grant face to face. Why was the McLean House chosen for the famous meeting and what has happened to the house since 1865?

(Editor’s Note: This park has an outstanding history. However, much of the park is not accessible by wheelchairs so we leave the question up to the reader as to whether a trip to the Appomattox Court House National Historical Park would be appropriate for their family.)

Booker T. Washington National Monument, Hardy, Virginia https://www.nps.gov/bowa/index.htm (540) 721-2094 https://www.facebook.com/BookerTWashingtonNPS

On April 5, 1856, Booker T. Washington was born a slave on the 207-acre farm of James Burroughs. After the Civil War, Washington became the first principal of Tuskegee Normal and Industrial School. Later as an adviser, author and orator, his past would influence his philosophies as the most influential African American of his era. Come explore his birthplace.

Begin your visit at the Visitor Center. Exhibits and an audio-visual presentation orient you to the life of Booker T. Washington. There is also a sales area with books and related items focusing on African American history. Uniformed park personnel and volunteers can answer your questions and assist you in making the most of your visit. The Plantation Trail is a ¼ mile loop through the historic area. It passes by reconstructions of the nineteenth century farm buildings similar to those that stood on the Burroughs Plantation when Booker T. Washington lived here as a boy. You are invited to explore the open buildings and read from the park brochure about the kinds of activities that took place in each. Jack-O-Lantern Branch Heritage Trail: In addition to the Plantation Trail, the monument provides an opportunity for a 1½ mile meandering walk through fields and forests on the Jack-O-Lantern Branch Trail. Trail guides are available at the Visitor Center. A picnic area in a wooded setting is available for your use. There you will find picnic tables, trash cans, and a water fountain. Restrooms are located in the Visitor Center. Farm Area: Sheep, pigs, horses and chickens help provide the mood to explore this recreated 1850’s tobacco farm. Come learn about the historic breeds of animals that would have been here during Washington’s time. Garden Area: Come learn about the gardening techniques used by owners and slaves on the farm. The garden is an example of a typical subsistence garden of piedmont Virginia of the 1850s.

Parking: Several handicapped spaces are available along with a circle drop-off/pick-up in front of the Visitor Center. Routes: Paved from parking area with a sidewalk to the visitor center; it is approximately 136 yards from the parking area to the Visitor Center entrance. Restrooms: Both of the men’s and women’s restrooms are wheelchair accessible. Benches: Provided throughout visitor center and outdoors area around the center. Picnic Area: Located next to the parking lot and has several wheelchair-accessible picnic tables and charcoal grills. Historic or Plantation Trail: Paved trail from the Visitor Center to the historic area; from the back of the Visitor Center, the trail has a slight slope that levels out towards the slave/kitchen cabin; there is a 14% gradient on the section by the main barn and pig pens; it is approximately a quarter mile there and back and is mostly paved. The historic area contains reconstructed buildings of the plantation, including the slave cabin where Booker lived till he was 9 yrs. old. Jack O’ Lantern Branch Trail, a/k/a the “nature trail”: The trail is approximately 1.25 miles and is an extension off the historic area trail. It is 36”-48” wide and is a mix of well-compacted dirt and gravel with a 17% grade on one section of the trail. The trail follows Gills Creek and switches back away from the creek through woods and a field back to the tobacco barn which is located close to the beginning of the nature trail.

Cumberland Gap National Historical Park (KY, TN, VA) https://www.nps.gov/cuga/index.htm (606) 248-2817 https://www.facebook.com/CumberlandGapNHP/

The story of early pioneers; settlers and soldiers; pristine mountain streams; sights and sounds of wildlife; pastoral landscapes- all can be found while exploring Cumberland Gap National Historical Park. The park consists of approximately 24,000 acres, 85 miles of trails, camping, and lots to do and see! Start your park adventure at the Visitor Center. The park’s visitor center complex includes a museum, auditorium, sales areas and restrooms. All are accessible, allowing for wheelchair use. Designated parking allows easy access to the building. Chat with a ranger, visit the hands-on museum, pick up a park map, or purchase a book. Leaving the visitor center, park visitors can drive a winding four-mile-long road up to the Pinnacle Overlook (elevation 2,440 feet) for a spectacular view into Kentucky, Virginia, and Tennessee. A level 1/4-mile paved trail provides access to this overlook, from which visitors have a spectacular view into Kentucky, Tennessee, and Virginia. Accessible restrooms are located near the overlook. When park staff is available, shuttles to the Pinnacle Overlook can be arranged; cost is $5.00 per person. Accessible drive-in campsites are available at the park’s Wilderness Road Campground. Surfaces within these sites have been hardened, the height of fire grates has been increased, and picnic tables have been modified. Restrooms and showers are accessible and are family friendly for visitors with small children. A short, paved trail leads to the campground’s amphitheater, where park rangers present programs on the cultural and natural history of the park. Almost 85 miles of hiking trails meander through eastern deciduous forest in this 24,000 acre national park. Distances range from a 1/4mile loop trail to the 21-mile-long Ridge Trail.

Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, Harpers Ferry, Virginia (MD, VA, WV) https://www.nps.gov/hafe/index.htm (304) 535-6029 https://www.facebook.com/harpersferrynps/

A visit to this quaint, historic community, at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah rivers, is like stepping into the past. Stroll the picturesque streets, visit exhibits and museums, or hike our trails and battlefields. Spend a day or a weekend. We have something for everyone, so come and discover Harpers Ferry! Harpers Ferry National Historical Park offers a wide variety of activities for individuals and families. Explore museums and exhibits, hike to overlooks or along Civil War skirmish lines, join a ranger-guided tour or sign-up for a living history workshop. Shop at the Harpers Ferry Park Association’s Bookshop for books, artwork, postcards, and items for kids of all ages. Talk to rangers and volunteers at the Visitor Center and Information Center who will assist you and answer any questions you may have.

Harpers Ferry National Historical Park is open year round with the exception of Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year’s Day. The Cavalier Heights Visitor Center is located at the main entrance of Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. The Visitor Center is open year-round from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and is staffed by park rangers and volunteers. From this location, visitors may park their vehicles and take a shuttle bus to the Lower Town district of the park.

Visitor Center Accessibility:

Parking: There are accessible parking spaces at the Visitor Center complex.

Restrooms: The restroom building’s exterior doors open manually.

Wheelchairs: The park has two wheelchairs available that may be borrowed by visitors upon request.

Shuttle Bus: The park’s shuttle buses are equipped for those with physical limitations. The buses kneel and have lifts to accommodate those who are unable to utilize the stairs.

Lower Town Accessibility:

Restrooms: An accessible restroom is located in the Bookshop building on Shenandoah Street. Restrooms are also located on the second floor of the John Brown Museum.

Exhibits and Museums: Most exhibits and museums in Lower Town have accessible entrances. These entrances are not always visible from the sidewalk. A map on the website highlights the accessible building entrances.

Sidewalks and Trails: The sidewalks in Lower Town are made of various materials including brick, slate, and cobblestone. Trails in Lower Town are mostly compacted dirt. The walkway between the John Brown Fort and The Point is gravel.

Shuttle Bus: The park’s shuttle buses are equipped for those with physical limitations. The buses kneel and have lifts to accommodate those who are unable to utilize the stairs.

Programs and Tours:

Ranger-guided programs vary in topic and tour stops. Please feel free to contact the park ahead of time to ask about program routes and accessibility.

Historic Jamestowne Part of Colonial National Historical Park, Virginia (Note: The mailing address is Yorktown, Virginia) https://www.nps.gov/jame/index.htm (757) 856-1200 https://www.facebook.com/COLOJAMESTOWNE

Walk in the steps of Captain John Smith and Pocahontas where a successful English colonization of North America began. Despite early struggles to survive, the 1607 settlement evolved into a prosperous colony. As the colony expanded, the Virginia Indians were pushed out of their homeland. In 1619, the arrival of Africans was recorded, marking the origin of slavery in English North America.

The Glasshouse and Glasshouse Gift Shop are operated by Eastern National, a not-for-profit “cooperating association” that supports the National Park Service. Visitors can watch as glass artisans make green glass wine bottles, similar to those found at Jamestown, and other items. These include vases, pitchers, candleholders, wine glasses and paper weights, just to name a few. These items are available for purchase and a portion of all sales comes back to the National Park Service. So any purchase helps support the Glassblowing demonstrations and the National Park Service at Historic Jamestowne. You may purchase glass items produced in our glasshouse through on-site sales, regular mail, phone and email (see the website for details).

During the summer season, visitors should dress in light, comfortable clothing, wear comfortable shoes and use sunscreen. We recommended you carry a bottle of water with you. High temperatures and high humidity create higher risk of heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heatstroke. Most of the Historic site is out-of-doors and although not a great distance from an air-conditioned building, staying properly hydrated will help prevent these illnesses. During the fall visitors should have a light jacket available as temperatures can drop suddenly. Winter temperatures can be unpredictable, ranging from mild to extremely cold. Visitors should be prepared for an onslaught of insects (biting flies, chiggers, mosquitoes, gnats and ticks) by wearing appropriate clothing and/or insect repellant. (Editor’s Note: I don’t think insect repellant should be an “and/or” from the description of insects.)

The following facilities are accessible to wheelchair users: The Jamestown Information Station (along the Colonial Parkway), the Visitor Center and Museum shop, the Historic Site, The Memorial Church (ramp on river side of church), The Dale House Café, and The Archaearium (by way of a ramp). The Visitor Center, Dale House Café and Archaearium all have mobility impaired automatic doors. The Glasshouse demonstration area is accessible by wheelchair but individuals may need assistance as the hard-packed dirt trial is steep. Those providing assistance to wheelchair bound visitors should keep in mind that pushing a wheelchair can be strenuous.

Accessible restrooms are located at the Jamestown Information Station, the Visitor Center, The Archaearium and the Glasshouse (located in the Glasshouse parking lot area). Mobility impaired visitors may need assistance at the Jamestown Information Station and Glasshouse restrooms as no automatic doors are available there. The walking paths to the Memorial Church, Dale House Café and the Archaearium consist of a base of hard-packed earth and gravel covered with crushed oyster shell, all under 5% grade. The trail is considered accessible, but some owners of narrow wheeled chairs may find this material more challenging to negotiate than hard paved surfaces. Under extremely wet conditions, some people may need assistance to pass along the trail due to the softness of the subgrade. All Ranger led programs follow these paths.

Historic Jamestowne has a three and five mile paved loop drive of the island for touring by private vehicle. There are two trails off this loop drive, one at Black Point and the other at the Travis Graveyard site. These are hard-packed dirt trails, which are considered accessible. Significant rain or tidal flooding may make these paths extremely difficult to navigate by wheelchair.

Washington-Rochambeau National Historic Trail (CT, DC, DE, MA, MD, NJ, NY, PA, RI, VA) https://www.nps.gov/waro/index.htm (215) 597-1581 https://www.facebook.com/Washington-Rochambeau-Revolutionary-Route-Natio...

In 1781, General Rochambeau’s French Army joined forces with General Washington’s Continental Army to fight the British Army in Yorktown, Virginia. With the French Navy in support, the allied armies moved hundreds of miles to become the largest troop movement of the American Revolution. The effort and cooperation between the two sides led to a victory at Yorktown and secured American independence. Rochambeau’s march north from July 1782 provided Americans an opportunity to give thanks to their country’s ally, for when the French infantry sailed out of Boston Harbor on Christmas Day 1782, King George III and Parliament had acknowledged the United States “to be free Sovereign and independent States.”

The Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historical Trail is over 680 miles of land and water trails that pass through nine states along the eastern coast of the United States. The trail’s large geographic presence serves to connect major metropolitan areas, national and state parks, historic and scenic trails, and countless other historic sites. Visitors can follow the route by exploring these different sites along the trail. Use the links on the website that listing each state to find sites that interpret the trail according to state. More information can also be found through our partner organization, the National Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Association, Inc. at W3R-US.org.

(Editor’s Note: This website provides a fascinating history of French and American military activities during the Civil War.)

Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts, Vienna, Virginia https://www.nps.gov/wotr/index.htm (703) 255-1800 https://www.facebook.com/wolftrapnps

Wolf Trap was established in 1966 and remains to be the only national park dedicated to the presenting the performing arts. The park is open every day with a few exceptions and limits. Most of the activities in the park during the summer are centered around performances at the Filene Center and Theatre in the Woods. Performances at the Filene Center run from late May through mid-September and Theatre-in-the-Woods offers performances from late June through mid-August. There are opportunities year-round to hike and enjoy the outdoors, picnic, and participate in ranger programs or walks. Learn more about the education and interpretive programs available and see the Schedule of Events via links on the website. Ranger led programs are available year round. All tours and programs are free and open to the public. Backstage Tours: Stand on a world-class stage, learn how a theater runs, and get a sneak peek at where the stars get ready. Backstage tours are available from October - April. Tours are limited to 30 participants. Less than half of Wolf Trap’s land is developed, leaving about 65 acres of woodland, streams, and wetland with a wide variety of plants, animals, birds, and wildflowers. Wolf Trap’s natural areas add critical green space in a dense suburb, provide refuges for many species, serve as a migration rest stop for wildlife, and serve as a living biology classroom to the adjacent community.

Handicapped seating is available at the Filene Center. Theatre-in-the-Woods has general seating and a section is reserved for those with special seating needs. Accessible parking areas are available for shows at the Filene Center and Theatre-in-the-Woods. Traffic operations are directed by the United State Park Police and NPS Rangers. Please indicate to these personnel that you need accessible parking and they will park you as close as they can at the time that you arrive. For more information, call (703) 255-1820. At this time, no drop-offs will be allowed on the Circle in front of the Box Office during Filene Center performances. Starting three hours before any performance, anyone wanting to purchase tickets at the Box Office or needing to drop off people or picnic items near the Main Gate will need to temporarily park at the drop-off area adjacent to the Main Gate as directed by the NPS Park Rangers. Theatre-in-the-Woods: Traffic operations are directed by NPS Rangers. Please indicate to the ranger that you need accessible parking and close parking and/or a cart ride will be provided.

WASHINGTON

Washington is sometimes referred to as Washington State or the State of Washington to distinguish it from Washington, D.C., the capital of the U.S., which is often shortened to Washington. Washington is the only U.S. state named after a president. The Cascade Range contains several volcanoes, which reach altitudes significantly higher than the rest of the mountains. From the north to the south, these major volcanoes are Mount Baker, Glacier Peak, Mount Rainier, Mount St. Helens, and Mount Adams. All are considered active volcanoes. Mount Rainier, an active stratovolcano, is the state’s highest elevation at almost 14,411 feet and is the most topographically prominent mountain in the contiguous United States. On May 18, 1980, following a period of heavy tremors and eruptions, the northeast face of Mount St. Helens erupted violently, destroying a large part of the top of the volcano. The eruption flattened the forests, killed 57 people, flooded the Columbia River and its tributaries with ash and mud, and blanketed large parts of Washington eastward and other surrounding states in ash, making day look like night.

The state is the biggest producer of apples, hops, pears, red raspberries, spearmint oil, and sweet cherries, and ranks high in the production of apricots, asparagus, dry edible peas, grapes, lentils, peppermint oil, and potatoes. The state has led the U.S. in apple production since the 1920s. Washington ranks second in the United States in the production of wine, behind only California. Commercial fishing of salmon, halibut, and bottomfish makes a significant contribution to the state’s economy. Washington has over 1,000 dams, including the Grand Coulee Dam, built for a variety of purposes including irrigation, power, flood control, and water storage. Rainfall in Washington varies dramatically going from east to west. The western side of the Olympic Peninsula (including the Olympic Mountains) receives as much as 160 inches of precipitation annually, making it the wettest area of the 48 contiguous states and which supports dense forests of conifers and areas of temperate rainforest. These deep forests, such as the Hoh Rainforest, are among the only temperate rainforests in the continental United States. Semi-arid conditions occur in much of eastern Washington with the strongest rain shadow effects at the relatively low elevations of the central Columbia Plateau—especially the region just east of the Columbia River from about the Snake River to the Okanagan Highland. Thus, instead of rainforests, much of eastern Washington is covered with grassland and shrub-steppe (the shrub-steppe has sufficient moisture levels to support a cover of perennial grasses and/or shrubs).

The skeletal remains of Kennewick Man, one of the oldest and most complete human remains ever found in North America, were discovered in Washington. Beginning in 1792, American Captain Robert Gray established trade in sea otter pelts. The Lewis and Clark Expedition entered the state on October 10, 1805. Marcus Whitman, one of a group of missionaries, established a settlement in 1836. Whitman’s settlement would in 1843 help the Oregon Trail, the overland emigration route to the west, get established for thousands of emigrants in following decades. During the Great Depression, a series of hydroelectric dams were constructed along the Columbia River as part of a project to increase the production of electricity. This culminated in 1941 with the completion of the Grand Coulee Dam, the largest concrete structure in the United States.

Washington has a system of state highways, called State Routes, as well as an extensive ferry system which is the largest in the nation and the third largest in the world. Washington is crossed by a number of freight railroads, and Amtrak’s passenger Cascade route between Eugene, Oregon and Vancouver, BC, is the eighth busiest Amtrak service in the United States and one of the few profitable routes in the system. Washington has 15 National Parks, 1 National Trail managed by the NPS, 24 National historic Landmarks, 18 National Natural Landmarks, and 1 World Heritage Site.

Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium pdza.org 253.591.5337 Email:[email protected]
Woodland Park Zoo zoo.org Email:[email protected]
Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, Vancouver, WA https://www.nps.gov/fova/index.htm (360) 816-6230 https://www.facebook.com/FortVancouver Located on the north bank of the Columbia River, in sight of snowy mountain peaks and a vibrant urban landscape, this park has a rich cultural past. From a frontier fur trading post, to a powerful military legacy, the magic of flight, and the origin of the American Pacific Northwest, history is shared at four unique sites. Discover stories of transition, settlement, conflict, and community. On April 8, 2017, Fort Vancouver National Historic Site hosted a commemoration of the centennial of the entry of the United States into the First World War. The event was held at Pearson Air Museum. The event featured costumed interpreters, family-friendly crafts and activities, and a presentation on the DH-4 Liberty plane. The Liberty plane was the only American-made, American-piloted aircraft to fly in combat during the war. In 1947, National Park Service Archaeologist Louis Caywood was assigned with locating the original Fort Vancouver, which had burned to the ground in 1866, so that it could be preserved by the National Park Service. At that time, the location of the fort was an open field. Caywood’s efforts were successful, and his excavations from 1947 to 1952 began the process of locating the remains of the Hudson’s Bay Company fort. Reconstruction based on this archaeology began in the 1960s. Today, the fort stockade and several buildings have been reconstructed and can be explored by modern visitors. As the first U.S. Army post in the Pacific Northwest, Vancouver Barracks served as a major headquarters and supply depot during the Civil War and Indian War eras. During World War I, Vancouver Barracks was the principal district for the U.S. Army Signal Corps’ Spruce Production Division and the site of the world’s largest lumber mill. Today, Vancouver Barracks remains one of the nation’s most historic military posts, and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In the early years of the 20th century, Vancouver Barracks, and its polo field, was a central place for aviation enthusiasts to gather and try out their aircraft. In the early 1920s, the Spruce Mill was demolished, and the field once again became an air field, first known as the “Vancouver Barracks Aerodrome,” and christened “Pearson Air Field,” after Lt. Alexander Pearson, in 1925. Another highlight in the history of Pearson Field occurred in June 1937, when the Soviet Union launched the first trans-polar flight from Moscow with a three man crew, piloted by Valery Chkalov. After over three days of flying, and while en route to San Francisco, the ANT-25 aircraft piloted by Chkalov touched down at Pearson Field due to an engine oil leak. The event put Pearson Field, and Vancouver, Washington, on the front page of newspapers around the world. Pearson Field was decommissioned by the Army Air Corps at the end of World War II, but it remains in service as a municipal airfield. McLoughlin House (located in Oregon City, Oregon, approximately 25 miles from Fort Vancouver): John Loughlin was known in Oregon City as the “Doctor” – a trained physician who once presided over British fur trade interests in a vast area stretching from California to Alaska. He made money for the Hudson’s Bay Company, but also assisted exhausted, starving American emigrants arriving into the region via the Oregon Trail. Forced into retirement, he and his family settled into this home by the Willamette Falls in Oregon City in 1846. He became an American citizen in 1851, and served as the mayor of Oregon City. He and his wife Marguerite were known for their hospitality and generous support of those in the community. McLoughlin loaned money to emigrants to help them establish commercial ventures and he owned sawmills, a gristmill, a granary, a general store, and a shipping concern. He also donated land for schools and churches. McLoughlin’s home, saved from demolition by the McLoughlin Memorial Association and moved to its present location in 1909, was added to the National Park System in 2003 as a unit of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. Today, the house is restored to help tell of the life and accomplishments of John McLoughlin, known by many as the “Father of Oregon.” Park staff and volunteers provide a number of different activities including tours, talks, special events, and demonstrations of Victorian-era women’s handwork. The graves of McLoughlin and his wife Marguerite are next to the house. There are has several accessible shared-use trail routes. From the parking lot at 1001 E. Fifth Street to and within the reconstructed fort. To and from Pearson Air Museum and its parking lots, From the parking lots at the Columbia River Waterfront Park to Discovery Trail, and the park trail from the E. Fifth Street trail head to the Village and Land Bridge. Accessible viewpoints are available, including the veranda of the Chief Factor’s House inside the reconstructed fort (accessible via wheelchair lift), and several on the Land Bridge and Columbia River Waterfront. The lighting within the main exhibit hangar at Pearson Air Museum has been recently upgraded with lower energy LED fittings that yield higher light levels. These upgrades make the facility not only more accessible, but also more sustainable. The park’s restrooms in Vancouver, WA, are accessible for people with disabilities, and are located inside the reconstructed fort and at Pearson Air Museum. The restroom at the McLoughlin House Unit in Oregon City is not yet accessible, but plans to address this critical need are in progress.
Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail (ID,IL,IA,KS,MO,MT,NE,ND,OR,SD,WA) https://www.nps.gov/lecl/index.htm (402) 661-1804 (Omaha, Nebraska) https://www.facebook.com/lewisandclarknht

Between May 1804 and September 1806, 31 men, one woman, and a baby traveled from the plains of the Midwest to the shores of the Pacific Ocean and back. They called themselves the Corps of Discovery. In their search for a water route to the Pacific Ocean, they opened a window into the west for the young United States. Sacagawea; May 1788–December 20, 1812; also Sakakawea or Sacajawea, was a Lemhi Shoshone woman who helped the Lewis and Clark Expedition achieve each of its chartered mission objectives exploring the Louisiana Purchase. Over two hundred years later, visitors can retrace the Expedition’s path by following the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Among the more than 100 sites along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail, only five are National Park Service sites. To learn more about sites along the Trail, visit the Basic Information page under the Plan Your Visit section on the website. The Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail Headquarters Visitor Center is a handicapped accessible site. Bathrooms and most displays are accessible to those who are mobility impaired. The interpretive film is also accessible, has open caption and full audio.

Manhattan Project National Historical Park (TN, NM, WA) https://www.nps.gov/mapr/index.htm (505) 661-6277 This phone number is for the Los Alamos Unit Visitor Center. You may also contact the Oak Ridge Unit Visitor Center at (865) 576-6767 or the Hanford Unit Visitor Center at (509) 376-1647. https://www.facebook.com/ManhattanProjectNPS/

This site tells the story about the people, events, science, and engineering that led to the creation of the atomic bomb, which helped end World War II. The Clinton Engineer Works, which became the Oak Ridge Reservation, was the administrative and military headquarters for the Manhattan Project and home to more than 75,000 people who built and operated the city and industrial complex in the hills of East Tennessee. The Oak Ridge Reservation included three parallel industrial processes for uranium enrichment and experimental plutonium production. Oak Ridge Reservation bus tour is included in the price of admission to the American Museum of Science and Energy, and includes a 3-hour tour of: X-10 Graphite Reactor, New Bethel Church at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, The visitor overlook at the East Tennessee Technology Park (former home to the K-25 gaseous diffusion building), and the Y-12 New Hope History Center. The tour runs March through November. Dates and times vary from week to week. Please contact the American Museum of Science & Energy for the latest information (Phone: (865) 576-3200; Email: [email protected]).

The National Park Service and the Department of Energy are working together to safely expand access to the facilities included in the park. Many of the facilities are industrial in nature and Department of Energy is working to improve accessibility to the sites open to the public. Virtualization efforts are underway at all three sites. Please call the site ahead of your visit to discuss accessible programs, services, and activities at the individual sites and request accommodations.

Mount Rainier, Ashford (NPS office building), Washington https://www.nps.gov/mora/index.htm (360) 569-2211 https://www.facebook.com/MountRainierNPS

Ascending to 14,410 feet above sea level, Mount Rainier stands as an icon in the Washington landscape. An active volcano, Mount Rainier is the most glaciated peak in the contiguous U.S.A., spawning six major rivers. Subalpine wildflower meadows ring the icy volcano while ancient forest cloaks Mount Rainier’s lower slopes. Wildlife abounds in the park’s ecosystems. A lifetime of discovery awaits.

Mount Rainier National Park offers excellent opportunities for scenic drives, hiking, and mountain climbing. Most roads are open from late May to early October and all provide stunning views and access to a variety of hiking trails and other sites. While many visitors attempt to see the park in a day, consider an in-depth exploration of one or two areas of the park. Explore the links below for activities available at Mount Rainier National Park.

  • Bicycling
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  • Discover Wildflowers
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  • Hiking Trails
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  • Citizen Ranger Quests
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  • Activities for Kids
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  • Nearby Attractions
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  • Places to Go
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There are seven areas of the park (Paradise, Longmire, Ohanapecosh, Sunrise, Kautz Creek, Cougar Rock, and White River) and each has accessibility information listed on the website. See https://www.nps.gov/mora/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm for details. If you have special needs or situations not explained in the information below, call (360) 569-6575, any day between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. to speak to a park ranger. Basically, each area has accessible Visitor Centers, restrooms, and some have accessible trails or picnic areas.

Nez Perce National Historical Park (ID, MT, OR, WA) https://www.nps.gov/nepe/index.htm (208) 843-7009 https://www.facebook.com/DiscoverNezPerceNationalHistoricalPark

The Nez Perce National Park was established in 1965 to tell the story of the Nez Perce (Nimiipuu) people. Spread out over four states (Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington), following the route of the 1877 conflict, this park offers something for everyone. The history and culture of the Nez Perce surrounds the park. Discover how the Nimiipuu adapted and today thrive continuing to preserve their culture. Nez Perce National Historical Park has thirty-eight sites. F or 11,000 years the NiimiiPuu have been here. Their story is the story of the American Indian in all its glory and sadness. Park Rangers staff visitor centers in Spalding, Idaho and Wisdom, Montana. Other sites have staff, wayside exhibits or trail guides. There are dozens of interesting sites throughout this park and accessibility varies, so we suggest that you review the Visitors Guide found under the “Plan Your Visit” section on the website to determine which sites would be most appropriate for your family to visit. The Visitor Centers at Spalding and Big Hole battlefield have accessible restroom facilities and exhibits. Trails at Canoe Camp outside of Orofino, Idaho and the Heart of Monster in Kamiah, Idaho have accessible trails.

Olympic National Park, Port Angeles, Washington https://www.nps.gov/olym/index.htm (360) 565-3130 https://www.facebook.com/OlympicNPS

With its incredible range of precipitation and elevation, diversity is the hallmark of Olympic National Park. Encompassing nearly a million acres, the park protects a vast wilderness, thousands of years of human history, and several distinctly different ecosystems, including glacier-capped mountains, old-growth temperate rain forests, and over 70 miles of wild coastline. Designated as both a World Heritage Site and an International Biosphere Reserve by the United Nations, the park serves as a living laboratory for scientists and students, as well as an incredible natural playground for visitors. Millions of people visit Olympic each year to experience its beauty, diversity, and many opportunities for adventure, exploration, and recreation. Lodging accommodations are available seasonally inside the park at Lake Crescent Lodge, Log Cabin Resort, and Sul Duc Hot Springs Resort, and year-round at Kalaloch Lodge. Additional accommodations are available in communities outside the park. Reservations are highly recommended. Try to sample destinations within each of the park’s major ecosystems: subalpine, coast, temperate rain forest, and lowland forest. Boating, fishing, tidepooling, camping, day hikes, backpacking, wildlife viewing, climbing, ranger led programs, art and photography, winter activities, and night sky programs are some of the activities available at Olympic National Park.

There are nine separate areas with accessible trails and facilities: Olympic National Park Visitor Center, Hurricane Ridge, Elwha, Lake Crescent, Sol Duc, Mora, Hoh Rainforest, Kalaloch, and Quinault. See https://www.nps.gov/olym/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm on the website for specific details about each.

San Juan Island National Historical Park, Friday Harbor, Washington https://www.nps.gov/sajh/index.htm (360) 378-2240 No Facebook connection found on website.

San Juan Island is well known for splendid vistas, saltwater shore, quiet woodlands, orca whales and one of the last remaining native prairies in the Puget Sound/Northern Straits region. But it was also here in 1859 that the United States and Great Britain nearly went to war over possession of the island, the crisis ignited by the death of a pig. The crisis came on June 15, 1859, when Lyman Cutlar, an American, shot and killed a company pig rooting in his garden. When British authorities threatened to arrest Cutlar and evict all his countrymen from the island as trespassers, a delegation sought military protection from Brig. Gen. William S. Harney, the anti-British commander of the Department of Oregon. Harney responded by ordering Company D, 9th U.S. Infantry under Capt. George E. Pickett (of later Civil War fame) to San Juan. Pickett’s 64-man unit landed on July 27 and encamped near the HBC wharf on Griffin Bay, just north of Belle Vue Sheep Farm. The two sides accumulated large numbers of troops, warships, and cannons and other artillery. But when word of the crisis reached Washington, officials from both nations, unaware of the bizarre atmosphere on San Juan, were shocked that Cutlar’s pig murder had grown into a potentially explosive international incident. On October 21, 1872, the commission, through the kaiser, ruled in favor of the United States, establishing the boundary line through Haro Strait. Thus the San Juan Islands became American possessions and the final boundary between Canada and the United States was set. On November 25, 1872, the Royal Marines withdrew from English Camp. By July 1874, the last of the U.S. troops had left American Camp. Peace had finally come to the 49th parallel, and San Juan Island would be long remembered for the “war” in which the only casualty was a pig. (See https://www.nps.gov/sajh/learn/historyculture/the-pig-war.htm for the complete story about the “war.”)

Some of the things to do at San Juan Island National Park are:

Hike the trails at English and American camps. Some of the best hiking is in the park, from mountain vistas to deep forest to beach walking.

Pick blackberries. Himalayan blackberries are an exotic species of which the park would like to see less. Nevertheless, they are good eating when August comes round.

Observe flowers and trees. Spring is a great time to view wildflowers on American Camp’s prairies, especially the culturally significant camas.

Pick up shells. But remember, only the unoccupied ones.

Study artifacts in the American Camp Visitor Center. Four cases offer a view of the park’s historic and prehistoric periods with artifacts from both camps.

Time travel. Come to a re-enactment at English Camp on any Saturday during the summer, squint and you might believe it’s 1861.

Boating and kayaking. Some of the best kayaking in the Pacific Northwest exists in the San Juan Islands, with launching and beaching sites at both camps. Check with a ranger or volunteer.

Bird Watching. Eighteen varieties of raptor live in the park, as well as nesting and shore birds. Many birders consider American Camp one of the best watching areas in the entire world.

Observe deer, fox, snakes. The Pacific black-tailed deer is the largest land mammal in the San Juan’s and native to the islands. They can be spotted almost anywhere in the park and on roadsides. The red fox was introduced to the island at several points during the 20th century. Though not necessarily “red” (they range from orange to black to mottled), it is readily identifiable by its white tipped tail. Garter snakes may startle you on the trails. No vipers exist in Washington State west of the North Cascades mountains.

Observe whales, seals, porpoises, otters. The bluff trails at American Camp are the best places for viewing marine life, especially between April and September.

Tidepooling. American Camp’s network of pocket coves along the Strait of Juan de Fuca reveal a wide variety of mollusks, arthropods (barnacles, crabs, shrimps, etc.) and plant life. Check tide tables posted online or ask at the American Camp or English Camp visitor centers.

Watch a sunset. The setting sun spins gold anywhere in the park. Dragonflies glitter on the English Camp parade ground.

Look at the stars. The dark prairie at American Camp and English Camp’s Young Hill provide spectacular vistas of the heavens. Bring your telescope.

ACCESSIBILITY: The American Camp Visitor Center has reserved parking and is accessible by ramp. The restrooms, exhibit area, bookstore, information desk, and drinking fountain are fully wheelchair-accessible. Rangers are on duty to answer questions and assist visitors. English Camp is far less accessible. Only the parking lot, picnic area, and parking lot restrooms are accessible most of the year. However, during the summer months (June-September) a staff operated golf cart is available to shuttle those who need assistance to and from the parade grounds.

All four picnic areas are accessible by car. At American Camp the picnic areas are located at the visitor center, adjacent to the Fourth of July beach parking lot, and along South Beach. Most of the picnic tables are located very close to parking areas and are easily accessed. Some tables are harder to get to, most notably at South Beach were short areas of sand must be crossed to reach some tables. All three areas have accessible restrooms. The picnic area at English Camp is located at the top of the parking lot and is easily accessible. A fully accessible restroom is also located in the parking area.

While no trail at American Camp meets all ADA standards for trails, there are some trails that most visitors in wheelchairs find very easy to navigate. Those trails include the trail from the visitor center to the redoubt and the some of the trails that start at the Jakle’s Lagoon parking lot. Please contact the American Camp Visitor Center for specific information. Unfortunately, there are no accessible trails at English Camp.

Park staff gladly offers programs for anyone with special needs. If you would like to schedule a program in advance, please call the American Camp Visitor Center at (360) 378-2240, ext. 2228.

WEST VIRGINIA

West Virginia was the only state to form by separating from a Confederate state (Virginia), the first to separate from any state since Maine separated from Massachusetts, and was one of two states formed during the American Civil War (the other being Nevada). It is the only state that is entirely within the area served by the Appalachian Regional Commission; the area is commonly defined as “Appalachia.” The Appalachian Mountains are some of the oldest on earth, having formed over 300 million years ago. The state is almost entirely mountainous, giving reason to the nickname The Mountain State and the motto Montani Semper Liberi (“Mountaineers are always free”). The new state was admitted to the Union in 1863. In 1864 a state constitutional convention drafted a constitution, which was ratified by the legislature without putting it to popular vote. West Virginia abolished slavery and temporarily disfranchised men who had held Confederate office or fought for the Confederacy.

Saltpeter caves had been employed throughout Appalachia for munitions. The border between West Virginia and Virginia includes the “Saltpeter Trail,” a string of limestone caverns containing rich deposits of calcium nitrate (a constituent of gun powder) that were rendered and sold to the government. In the late 18th-century, saltpeter miners in Haynes Cave found large animal bones in the deposits. These were sent by a local historian and frontier soldier Colonel John Stuart to Thomas Jefferson. (Note: Thomas Jefferson had many hobbies such as archaeology, horticulture, fishing, walking, riding, violin playing, Mastodon hunting and searching for fossils. He also enjoyed inventing things and designing architecture.) The bones were named Megalonyx jeffersonii, or great-claw, and became known as Thomas Jefferson’s three-toed sloth. The generic name Megalonyx was proposed by future U.S. President Thomas Jefferson in 1797, based on fossil specimens of what later came to be called Megalonyx jeffersonii that he had received from western Virginia. His presentation to the American Philosophical Society that year is often credited as the beginning of vertebrate paleontology in North America. It was declared the official state fossil of West Virginia in 2008.

In the second half of the 19th century, there was an even greater treasure not yet developed: bituminous coal. It would fuel much of the Industrial Revolution in the U.S. and the steamships of many of the world’s navies. When the renamed Virginian Railway (VGN) was completed in 1909, no fewer than three railroads were shipping ever-increasing volumes of coal to export from Hampton Roads. West Virginia coal was also under high demand at Great Lakes ports. The VGN and the N&W ultimately became parts of the modern Norfolk Southern system, and the VGN’s well-engineered 21st-century tracks continue to offer a favorable gradient to Hampton Roads. Coal is not the only valuable mineral found in West Virginia, as the state was the site of the 1928 discovery of the 34.48 carat Jones Diamond.

Alongside outdoor recreation opportunities, the state offers a number of historic and cultural attractions. Harpers Ferry National Historical Park is a historic town situated at the confluence of the Shenandoah and Potomac Rivers. Harpers Ferry was the site of John Brown’s 1859 slave revolt and raid on the US Armory and Arsenal. The town is also the approximate midpoint of the Appalachian Trail and home to the Appalachian Trail Conservancy. The Greenbriar hotel and resort, originally built in 1778, has long been considered a premier hotel frequented by numerous world leaders and U.S. Presidents over the years. West Virginia is also home to the Green Bank Telescope at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. The main building of Weston State Hospital, the largest hand-cut sandstone building in North America, second worldwide only to the Kremlin in Moscow, is also located in West Virginia. Tours of the building, which is a National Historic Landmark and member of the National Civil War Trail, are offered seasonally and by appointment year round. The Wheeling Suspension Bridge was the first bridge built across the Ohio River in 1849 and for a time was the longest suspension bridge in the world. It is still the oldest vehicular suspension bridge in the United States still in use.

Every summer, the city of Elkins hosts the Augusta Heritage Festival, which brings folk musicians from around the world. John Denver’s hit song “Take Me Home, Country Roads” describes the experience of driving through West Virginia. The song mentions the Shenandoah River and the Blue Ridge Mountains, both features traversing the easternmost extremity of the state’s “eastern panhandle”, in Jefferson County.

West Virginia has 6 National Parks, 3 National Heritage Areas, 1 Wild & Scenic River managed by the NPS, 2 National Trails managed by the NPS, 16 National Historic Landmarks, and 15 National Natural Landmarks.

Oglebay Park Good Zoo oglebay-resort.com/goodzoo 800.624.6988 Email:[email protected]
Hovatter’s Wildlife Zoo westvirginiazoo.com 304.329.3122
Appalachian National Scenic Trail (CT, GA, MA, MD, ME, NC, NH, NJ, NY, PA, TN, VA, VT, WV) https://www.nps.gov/appa/index.htm (304) 535-6278 (Harpers Ferry, WV) No Facebook connection found on home page.

Conceived in 1921, built by private citizens, and completed in 1937, today the Appalachian Trail is managed by the National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, numerous state agencies and thousands of volunteers. The Appalachian Trail is a 2,180+ mile long public footpath that traverses the scenic, wooded, pastoral, wild, and culturally resonant lands of the Appalachian Mountains from Georgia to Maine. The Appalachian National Scenic Trail does not currently have a visitor center. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy, a national not-for-profit corporation has a visitor center in Harpers Ferry, WV. The Appalachian Trail has been enjoyed by visitors with a variety of disabilities - including the blind, hearing-impaired, and hikers with a range of mobility limitations. The trail is not highly developed though, and there are only a few sections that are considered fully accessible.

Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, Harpers Ferry, Virginia (MD, VA, WV) https://www.nps.gov/hafe/index.htm (304) 535-6029 https://www.facebook.com/harpersferrynps/

A visit to this quaint, historic community, at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah rivers, is like stepping into the past. Stroll the picturesque streets, visit exhibits and museums, or hike our trails and battlefields. Spend a day or a weekend. We have something for everyone, so come and discover Harpers Ferry! Harpers Ferry National Historical Park offers a wide variety of activities for individuals and families. Explore museums and exhibits, hike to overlooks or along Civil War skirmish lines, join a ranger-guided tour or sign-up for a living history workshop. Shop at the Harpers Ferry Park Association’s Bookshop for books, artwork, postcards, and items for kids of all ages. Talk to rangers and volunteers at the Visitor Center and Information Center who will assist you and answer any questions you may have.

Harpers Ferry National Historical Park is open year round with the exception of Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year’s Day. The Cavalier Heights Visitor Center is located at the main entrance of Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. The Visitor Center is open year-round from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and is staffed by park rangers and volunteers. From this location, visitors may park their vehicles and take a shuttle bus to the Lower Town district of the park.

Visitor Center Accessibility:

Parking: There are accessible parking spaces at the Visitor Center complex.

Restrooms: The restroom building’s exterior doors open manually.

Wheelchairs: The park has two wheelchairs available that may be borrowed by visitors upon request.

Shuttle Bus: The park’s shuttle buses are equipped for those with physical limitations. The buses kneel and have lifts to accommodate those who are unable to utilize the stairs.

Lower Town Accessibility:

Restrooms: An accessible restroom is located in the Bookshop building on Shenandoah Street. Restrooms are also located on the second floor of the John Brown Museum.

Exhibits and Museums: Most exhibits and museums in Lower Town have accessible entrances. These entrances are not always visible from the sidewalk. A map on the website highlights the accessible building entrances.

Sidewalks and Trails: The sidewalks in Lower Town are made of various materials including brick, slate, and cobblestone. Trails in Lower Town are mostly compacted dirt. The walkway between the John Brown Fort and The Point is gravel.

Shuttle Bus: The park’s shuttle buses are equipped for those with physical limitations. The buses kneel and have lifts to accommodate those who are unable to utilize the stairs.

Programs and Tours: Ranger-guided programs vary in topic and tour stops. Please feel free to contact the park ahead of time to ask about program routes and accessibility.

Historic Jamestowne Part of Colonial National Historical Park (MD, VA, WV) https://www.nps.gov/jame/index.htm (757) 856-1200 https://www.facebook.com/COLOJAMESTOWNE

Walk in the steps of Captain John Smith and Pocahontas where a successful English colonization of North America began. Despite early struggles to survive, the 1607 settlement evolved into a prosperous colony. As the colony expanded, the Virginia Indians were pushed out of their homeland. In 1619, the arrival of Africans was recorded, marking the origin of slavery in English North America.

The Glasshouse and Glasshouse Gift Shop are operated by Eastern National, a not-for-profit “cooperating association” that supports the National Park Service. Visitors can watch as glass artisans make green glass wine bottles, similar to those found at Jamestown, and other items. These include vases, pitchers, candleholders, wine glasses and paper weights, just to name a few. These items are available for purchase and a portion of all sales comes back to the National Park Service. So any purchase helps support the Glassblowing demonstrations and the National Park Service at Historic Jamestowne. You may purchase glass items produced in our glasshouse through on-site sales, regular mail, phone and email (see the website for details).

During the summer season visitors should dress in light, comfortable clothing, wear comfortable shoes and use sunscreen. We recommended you carry a bottle of water with you. High temperatures and high humidity create higher risk of heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heatstroke. Most of the Historic site is out-of-doors and although not a great distance from an air-conditioned building, staying properly hydrated will help prevent these illnesses. During the fall visitors should have a light jacket available as temperatures can drop suddenly. Winter temperatures can be unpredictable, ranging from mild to extremely cold. Visitors should be prepared for an onslaught of insects (biting flies, chiggers, mosquitoes, gnats and ticks) by wearing appropriate clothing and/or insect repellant (strongly recommended).

The following facilities are accessible to wheelchair users: The Jamestown Information Station (along the Colonial Parkway), the Visitor Center and Museum shop, the Historic Site, The Memorial Church (ramp on river side of church), The Dale House Café, and The Archaearium (by way of a ramp). The Visitor Center, Dale House Café and Archaearium all have mobility impaired automatic doors. The Glasshouse demonstration area is accessible by wheelchair but individuals may need assistance as the hard-packed dirt trial is steep. Those providing assistance to wheelchair bound visitors should keep in mind that pushing a wheelchair can be strenuous.

Accessible restrooms are located at the Jamestown Information Station, the Visitor Center, The Archaearium and the Glasshouse (located in the Glasshouse parking lot area). Mobility impaired visitors may need assistance at the Jamestown Information Station and Glasshouse restrooms as no automatic doors are available there. The walking paths to the Memorial Church, Dale House Café and the Archaearium consist of a base of hard-packed earth and gravel covered with crushed oyster shell, all under 5% grade. The trail is considered accessible, but some owners of narrow wheeled chairs may find this material more challenging to negotiate than hard paved surfaces. Under extremely wet conditions, some people may need assistance to pass along the trail due to the softness of the subgrade. All Ranger led programs follow these paths.

Historic Jamestowne has a three- and five-mile paved loop drive of the island for touring by private vehicle. There are two trails off this loop drive, one at Black Point and the other at the Travis Graveyard site. These are hard-packed dirt trails, which are considered accessible. Significant rain or tidal flooding may make these paths extremely difficult to navigate by wheelchair.

Wheeling National Heritage Area, Wheeling, West Virginia https://www.nps.gov/whee/index.htm (304) 232-3087 https://www.facebook.com/WheelingHeritage/

The Wheeling National Heritage Area celebrates the city’s dramatic setting along the Ohio River, providing experiences in Victorian architecture, waterfront park development, historic city markets, renovated industrial buildings featuring retail shops, restaurants and interpretive exhibits, and West Virginia Independence Hall, the birthplace of the state of West Virginia during the Civil War. The great 1849 suspension bridge of Wheeling extended the National Road west, bringing people and goods to the city. At the northernmost navigable port on the Ohio River, overland routes, river traffic, and railroads converged, attracting entrepreneurs who manufactured iron, steel, nails, textiles, glass, tobacco, and other goods.

Listed below are shops, parks, and other venues in and around Wheeling that were included on the Wheeling Convention & Visitors Bureau website (http://wheelingcvb.com/attractions/). There was no general accessibility information found on either https://www.nps.gov/whee/index.htm or (http://wheelingcvb.com/attractions/) website. (We can only suggest contacting each of the various attractions to obtain specific accessibility information. Editor)

Centre Market: “This area is worth a visit if you’re in town. If you love antiques check out all the little shops on either side of the street, it’s worth a dig to find some treasures.” (This quoted comment is not attributed to its author, but likely a happy visitor to Wheeling.)

Victorian Old Town’s Eckhart House is one of the grandest town homes in the area. Historic guided tour offered Saturdays, 2 p.m. Enjoy freshly prepared traditional teas in the elegant Tea Room – reservations required. Unique Gift Shoppe on premises.

The 30-acre Good Zoo features an Outback Exhibit with kangaroos, plus rare and endangered species including African wild dogs, spectacled bears, tamarin monkeys and red pandas. Also features a 1-1/2 mile train ride through the zebra and ostrich exhibits plus bald eagles, cranes and turtles in the Wetlands exhibit. Visitors can feed colorful parrots at the Lorikeet Landing exhibit, pet domestic animals at the barn and enjoy hands-on activities in the Discovery Lab. The zoo also features the state’s largest O-gauge model train display and the Benedum Theater.

Grand Vue Park, Moundsville, West Virginia: Open year-round, this Marshall County park is filled with outdoor adventure with breathtaking views of the Ohio Valley. Grand Vue Park is home to 7,540 ft. of dual zip lines, a low elements course, walking and biking trails, a state-of-the-art aquatic center, three styles of cabins and a modern banquet hall making it a hub of outdoor recreation and popular choice for weddings, group outings, business meetings and family vacations.

Grave Creek Mound Historic Site, Moundsville, West Virginia: Grave Creek Mound Archaeological Complex in Moundsville features one of the largest and most famous of the Adena burial mounds. Visitors learn about the mound-builders and their well-organized societies in the Delf Norona Museum. Its research center provides protection, conservation and interpretation for West Virginia’s extensive archaeological collections.

Oglebay Institute’s Schrader Environmental Education Center, Wheeling, West Virginia: Nature exploration and outdoor fun await visitors at this hands-on facility. Attractions include the A.B. Brooks Discovery Trail System, Children’s Awareness Area, EarthTrek Exhibit Hall and Corson Wildflower and Butterfly Gardens. From tipi (teepee) stays to maple sugaring, the Schrader Center offers seasonal events for nature lovers of all ages.

In addition to the above, additional venues in and around Wheeling include:

Oglebay Institute’s Stifel Fine Arts Center and School of Dance, Wheeling, West Virginia

Oglebay Institute’s Towngate Theatre & Cinema, Wheeling, Virginia

Smart Centre Market and Smart Centre, Wheeling, Virginia: Do you love dinosaurs, space, and/or ice cream? We have all three at SMART (Science, Mathematics, Art, Research, and Technology) Centre Market, located in the Historic Centre Market district. Shop for educational toys, books, games, rocks, minerals, fossils, unique gifts, and much more in a museum/ science center setting where learning is fun for everyone. Community events including Saturday science demonstrations at 1 p.m. and First Friday StarWatches are led by the staff of the SMART Center, aa hands-on science and math outreach and member of the Association of Science and Technology Centers.

The Kruger Street Toy & Train Museum, Wheeling, Virginia: The museum features an impressive collection of thousands of toys and trains! Operating train layouts, frequently changing exhibits, a unique gift shop, ample free parking, and guided tours! Handicap accessible. Call for hours and admission (phone: (304) 242-8133).

The Museums of Oglebay Institute: The Mansion and Glass Museums depict Wheeling history from Pioneer times through the Victorian Era, feature 3,000 examples of Wheeling glass, glass making demonstrations and workshops. Wymer’s General Store & Sinclair Pharmacy include fascinating collections of Americana, taking guests back to a simpler time and place.

Thistledew Farm & Mountain Craft Shop, Proctor, West Virginia: Two great shops in one! Educational and FUN Bee Farm plus wooden toy shop! Learn about honey. Taste comb honey or hot pepper butter! Play with toys from your past! Live beehive (under glass), beeswax candles, cosmetics, soaps, marbles, gifts and more! Uncle Bunk’s Pickles, Appalachian Glass. Scenic ride 40 miles South of Wheeling Call for directions and hours (phone: (304) 455-1728).

West Virginia Independence Hall Civil War Historic Site and Museum, Wheeling, West VA

West Virginia Independence Hall, built in 1859 as a federal custom house, served as the home of the pro-Union conventions of Virginia in 1861, the capitol of loyal Virginia from June 1861 to June 1863, and the site of the first constitutional convention for West Virginia. The Renaissance Revival-style structure is a National Historic Landmark.

Wheeling Artisan Center, Wheeling, West Virginia: Visit the Wheeling Artisan Center for the finest in handcrafted creations by West Virginia and regional artists. Shop for West Virginia glass, pottery, jewelry, West Virginia food products, local interest books, fabric arts, souvenirs, and much more! This renovated industrial building with a three-story atrium in the heart of downtown Wheeling is a tribute to this city’s rich cultural heritage.

Wheeling Island Hotel, Casino and Racetrack, Wheeling, West Virginia

Wheeling Ohio County Airport, Wheeling, West Virginia: Its terminal is an aviation museum that is a sight to see.

Wheeling Park, Wheeling, West Virginia: Wheeling’s first public park has provided recreation, relaxation and entertainment for people of all ages since 1925. Included on Wheeling Park’s 406 acres are: golf, pedal boating, indoor and outdoor tennis, outdoor pool and waterslide, ice skating, playground, picnic sites and shelters, and the White Palace with a restaurant and banquet hall.

Wheeling Symphony, Wheeling, West Virginia: The Wheeling Symphony provides quality symphonic and pops music with internationally and nationally acclaimed guest soloists that have included major artists of our time: Yehudi Menuhin, Arthur Rubenstein, Roberta Peters, Marian Anderson, Pinchas Zukerman, Itzhac Perlman, Yo-Yo Ma, Richard Stolzman, Andre Watts, and the late Jean-Pierre Rampal, to name a few. Call for details on upcoming concerts (phone: (304) 232-6191).

WISCONSIN

Wisconsin is second to Michigan in the length of its Great Lakes coastline. Wisconsin is known as “America’s Dairyland” because it is one of the nation’s leading dairy producers, particularly famous for its cheese. Toward the end of the Woodland period between 1000 BCE to 1000 CE, Wisconsin was the heartland of the “Effigy Mound culture,” which built thousands of animal-shaped mounds across the landscape, and which mounds generally contained human remains. (Common Era or Current Era (CE) is a year-numbering system (calendar era) for the Julian and Gregorian calendars that refers to the years since the start of this era, i.e., since AD 1. The preceding era is referred to as before the Common or Current Era (BCE).) The prospect of easy mineral wealth drew immigrants from throughout the U.S. and Europe to the lead deposits located at Mineral Point, Dodgeville, and nearby areas. Some miners found shelter in the holes they had dug and earned the nickname “badgers,” leading to Wisconsin’s identity as the “Badger State.” The home of Nelson Dewey, the first governor of Wisconsin, is now a state park.

Wisconsin’s economy also diversified during the early years of statehood. While lead mining diminished, agriculture became a principal occupation in the southern half of the state. Wisconsin briefly became one of the nation’s leading producers of wheat during the 1860s. Meanwhile, the lumber industry dominated in the heavily forested northern sections of Wisconsin, and sawmills sprang up. These economic activities had dire environmental consequences. By the close of the 19th century, intensive agriculture had devastated soil fertility, and lumbering had deforested most of the state. Beginning in the 1890s, many immigrants carried cheese-making traditions that, combined with the state’s suitable geography and dairy research, helped the state build a reputation as “America’s Dairyland.” Industries in cities like Milwaukee ranged from brewing and food processing to heavy machine production and toolmaking. Towards the close of the 20th century, heavy industry and manufacturing declined in favor of a service economy based on medicine, education, agribusiness, and tourism. Two U.S. Navy battleships, BB-9 and BB-64, were named for the state.

In 2011, Wisconsin became the focus of some controversy when newly elected governor Scott Walker proposed and successfully passed and enacted 2011 Wisconsin Act 10, which made large changes in the areas of collective bargaining, compensation, retirement, health insurance, and sick leave of public sector employees, among other changes. A series of major protests by union supporters took place that year in protest to the changes, and Walker survived a recall election held the next year, becoming the first governor in United States history to do so.

Wisconsin produces about a quarter of America’s cheese, leading the nation in cheese production. It is second in milk production, after California, and third in per-capita milk production, behind California and Vermont. Wisconsin is second in butter production, producing about one-quarter of the nation’s butter. The state ranks first nationally in the production of corn for silage, cranberries, ginseng, and snap beans for processing. It grows over half the national crop of cranberries, and 97% of the nation’s ginseng. Wisconsin also ranks first nationwide in the production of paper products. The distinctive Door Peninsula, which extends off the eastern coast of the state, contains one of the state’s tourist destinations, Door County. Door County is a popular destination for boaters because of the large number of natural harbors, bays, and ports on the Green Bay and Lake Michigan side of the peninsula that forms the county. The area draws hundreds of thousands of visitors yearly to its quaint villages, seasonal cherry picking, and fish boils. Monona Terrace in Madison, a convention center designed by Taliesin architect Anthony Puttnam, is based on a 1930s design by Frank Lloyd Wright. Wright’s home and studio in the 20th century was at Taliesin, south of Spring Green. Decades after Wright’s death, Taliesin remains an architectural office and school for his followers.

Milwaukee hosts Summerfest, dubbed “The World’s Largest Music Festival,” every year. The National Football League’s Green Bay Packers have been part of the NFL since the league’s second season in 1921 and hold the record for the most NFL titles. The Packers are the smallest city franchise in the NFL and the only one owned by shareholders statewide. Wisconsin is home to the world’s oldest operational racetrack. The Milwaukee Mile, located in Wisconsin State Fair Park in West Allis, Wisconsin, held races there that considerably predate the Indy 500. Wisconsin is home to the nation’s oldest operating velodrome (a velodrome is an arena for track cycling) in Kenosha where races have been held every year since 1927.

Wisconsin has 2 National Parks, 2 Wild & Scenic Rivers managed by the NPS, 2 National Trails managed by the NPS, 42 National Historic Landmarks, and 18 National Natural Landmarks.

Milwaukee County Zoo milwaukeezoo.org 414.256.5412 Email:[email protected] milwaukeecountywi.gov
Henry Vilas Zoo vilaszoo.org 608.266.4732 Email:[email protected]
Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, Bayfield, Wisconsin https://www.nps.gov/apis/index.htm (715) 779-3397 https://www.facebook.com/apostleislandsnationallakeshore

Along windswept beaches and cliffs, visitors experience where water meets land and sky, culture meets culture, and past meets present. The 21 islands and 12 miles of mainland host a unique blend of cultural and natural resources. Lighthouses shine over Lake Superior and the new wilderness areas. Visitors can hike, paddle, sail, or cruise to experience these Jewels of Lake Superior. Getting to these islands on Lake Superior can be a challenge, but there are several ways to go about it: On your own (your own boat or kayak), via Apostle Islands Cruises, via Business Partners – Tours, Kayak Outfitters, Charters and Water Taxis, and the Car Ferry to Madeline Island. (See website link https://www.nps.gov/apis/planyourvisit/getting-to-the-islands.htm for specifics about each method.) Things To Do: Boating, camping, fishing, guided activities, hiking, hunting and trapping, kayaking, scuba diving, and half-day, day-trip and extended trip information (https://www.nps.gov/apis/planyourvisit/things2do.htm). The mainland Visitor Centers are fully accessible. Due to their isolation and transportation requirements, the islands are not readily accessible for individuals in wheelchairs or those with limited mobility.

Ice Age National Scenic Trail, Madison, Wisconsin https://www.nps.gov/iatr/index.htm (608) 441-5610 No Facebook connection found on website.

A mere 15,000 years ago during the Ice Age, much of North America lay under a huge glacier. Mammoths, saber tooth cats and cave lions roamed the earth! Some of the best evidence of this glacier is found in Wisconsin such as the state’s many lakes, river valleys, gently rolling hills, and ridges. The nearly 1,200 mile Ice Age National Scenic Trail, established in 1980, traces the glacier’s edge. Since the trail crosses lands managed by many different public agencies and private landowners, individual trail segments may have different rules and regulations governing their use, and different camping fees and registration policies may apply. It is a good idea to review the rules of the local land managers before you start. Some of the trail segments are more accessible than others (https://www.nps.gov/iatr/getinvolved/index.htm). Check with local land managers and partners for more information. Our primary state-wide partners include the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and the Ice Age Trail Alliance. There are also many local partners that participate in the trail by developing and managing specific segments, including the U.S. Forest Service; county and municipal park and forestry departments. Other partners include conservation, civic, and youth organizations; and private landowners (https://www.nps.gov/iatr/getinvolved/partners.htm).

(Editor’s Note: I found the accessibility information rather confusing. Basically, I suggest if you are planning a trip to the Ice Age National Scenic Trail, you should contact the park for additional details concerning the area you would like to visit.)

Saint Croix National Scenic Riverway, St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin https://www.nps.gov/sacn/index.htm (715) 483-2274 https://www.facebook.com/StCroixNationalScenicRiverway/ (Note: This URL was accessed from the St. Croix Scenic Riverway home page, but resulted in a message stating that the Facebook page no longer existed.)

Grab your paddle and your longing for adventure and head to the St. Croix and Namekagon rivers! Together they form the St. Croix National Scenic Riverway, offering over 200 miles of clean water that glides and rushes through a forested landscape. Paddle, boat, fish, and camp among this wild and scenic beauty. Hiking and historic towns also beckon, if you can bear to leave the cool water.

Namekagon River Visitor Center: The National Park Service operates this seasonal Visitor Center where people can view exhibits, pick up park publications, Junior Ranger booklets, and maps, and watch the park movie. Park rangers staff an information counter and offer trip planning assistance for the Namekagon and upper St. Croix rivers. The Visitor Center is located near the Namekagon River with picnic tables and a demonstration garden surrounding the building.,

St. Croix River Visitor Center: The National Park Service operates this seasonal Visitor Center where visitors can view exhibits and aquarium, pick up park publications, Junior Ranger booklets, and maps, and view the park film. Park rangers offer trip planning assistance for the St. Croix and Namekagon rivers. The park headquarters offices are also located in this building. It is located next to the St. Croix River where a fishing dock, picnic tables, and demonstration garden complete the grounds.

The St. Croix Visitor Center at St. Croix Falls and the Namekagon Visitor Center at Trego are both accessible with exhibits, restrooms and a movie. Open caption, audio descriptions and assisted listening devices are available for the movie. Many picnic areas at landings have accessible picnic tables and vault toilets. Osceola Landing: across the river from Osceola, Wisconsin, has accessible picnic shelters, paths, drinking fountains, and toilets. Canoeing and camping along the Riverway is possible for most individuals with disabilities if they have assistance. For specific questions, contact Riverway park staff by email (see website for form) or call (715) 483-2274.

WYOMING

The state is the second least densely populated state in the country, with Alaska being the first. The Great Plains meet the Rocky Mountains in Wyoming. The state is a great plateau broken by many mountain ranges. The Continental Divide spans north-south across the central portion of the state. Rivers east of the divide drain into the Missouri River Basin and eventually the Gulf of Mexico. The Continental Divide forks in the south central part of the state in an area known as the Great Divide Basin where the waters that flow or precipitate into this area remain there and cannot flow to any ocean. Instead, because of the overall aridity of Wyoming, water in the Great Divide Basin simply sinks into the soil or evaporates. Wyoming is a dry state with much of the land receiving less than 10 inches (250 mm) of rainfall per year.

John Colter, a member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, itself guided by French Canadian Toussaint Charbonneau and his young Shoshone wife, Sacagawea, first described the region in 1807. At the time, his reports of the Yellowstone area were considered to be fictional. In 1850, Jim Bridger also explored Yellowstone and filed reports on the region that, like those of Colter, were largely regarded as tall tales at the time. Once government-sponsored expeditions to the Yellowstone country began, reports by Colter and Bridger, previously believed to be apocryphal, were found to be true. This led to the creation of Yellowstone National Park, which became the world’s first national park in 1872. Each year Yellowstone National Park receives three million visitors. Nearly all of Yellowstone National Park lies within the far northwestern borders of Wyoming.

The composition of Wyoming’s economy differs significantly from that of other states with most activity in tourism, agriculture, and energy extraction; and little in anything else. Wyoming possesses the world’s largest known reserve of trona, a mineral used for manufacturing glass, paper, soaps, baking soda, water softeners, and pharmaceuticals. In 2008 Wyoming produced 46 million short tons (41.7 million metric tons) of trona, 25% of the world’s production. Wyoming is one of only two states (the other being South Dakota) in the 48 contiguous states not served by Amtrak. The Wind River Indian Reservation is shared by the Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho tribes of Native Americans in the central western portion of the state near Lander. The reservation is home to 2,500 Eastern Shoshone and 5,000 Northern Arapaho. The reservation is a sovereign, self-governed land with two independent governing bodies: the Eastern Shoshone Tribal Government and the Northern Arapaho Tribal Government.

Wyoming has 7 National Parks, 1 Wild & Scenic River managed by the NPS, 4 National Trails managed by the NPS, 25 National Historic Landmarks, 6 National Natural Landmarks, and 1 World Heritage Site.

California National Historic Trail (CA, CO, ID, KS, MO, NE, NV, OR, UT, WY) https://www.nps.gov/cali/index.htm (801) 741-1012 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/oregoncalifornianps

Between 1841 and 1869, more than a quarter million people answered this call and crossed the plains and mountains to the West. These emigrants started their journeys in Kansas and Missouri, walking more than 2,000 miles for months in pursuit of a better life. The California and Oregon Trails follow the same route until Idaho, where they diverge, the Oregon Trail turning north to Oregon and the California Trail heading to California. A complete summary is set forth under the state of California, the final destination of the trail.

Devils Tower National Monument, Devils Tower, Wyoming https://www.nps.gov/deto/index.htm (307) 467-5283, ext. 635 https://www.facebook.com/devilstower.nps

An astounding geologic feature that protrudes out of the rolling prairie surrounding the Black Hills, this site is considered sacred to the Northern Plains Indians and other tribes. Hundreds of parallel cracks make it one of the finest traditional crack climbing areas in North America. Other things to do include hiking trails, Ranger programs, and night sky viewing. The Devils Tower National Monument Visitor Center contains interpretive exhibits, as well as the Devils Tower Natural History Association bookstore and souvenir shop. The Visitor Center was built in the 1930’s by the Civilian Conservation Corps and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Additional information can be found at the kiosk across the parking lot. Under the awning (available during the summer), you can find Ranger Programs, interpretive exhibits, and climbing registration. Every June, a voluntary climbing closure is implemented in deference to American Indian cultural values. Also, the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally typically occurs during the first full week of August every year. Hundreds of thousands of motorcyclists gather in the Black Hills region and often visit particular sites on certain days. The “Ride to Devils Tower” typically occurs on the Wednesday of that week. Visitors can expect extremely long lines and waits to enter the park.

Accessibility: Built in 1935, the log structure Visitors Center features exhibits on Devils Tower. The doorway will accommodate wheelchairs up to 35 inches in width. Curb cuts allow access to drinking fountains, benches, binoculars, and the information kiosk in the center plaza area. Accessible restrooms are located in the first log building on the right as you enter the Visitor Center parking lot. The 1.3 mile Tower Trail circles the base of the Tower and is paved. The trail has steep grades and is not recommended for wheelchair users. The steepest part of the trail can be seen from the Visitor Center parking lot. Please use your own judgment on this trail. Other trails in the monument are not accessible. Belle Fourche River Campground: Four sites in the campground are accessible - sites A-2, A-4, B-11, and B-25. Campground restrooms are accessible. Belle Fourche River Campground Amphitheater: The outdoor amphitheater is wheelchair accessible. Accessible restrooms are available across the street in the picnic area. Picnic Area: The restrooms and drinking fountain are accessible. Two picnic tables will accommodate wheelchairs. They are located on either side of the sidewalk before you reach the restrooms.

Fossil Butte National Monument, Kemmerer, Wyoming https://www.nps.gov/fobu/index.htm (307) 877-4455 No Facebook connection found on the website.

Some of the world’s best preserved fossils are found in the flat-topped ridges of southwestern Wyoming’s cold sagebrush desert. Fossilized fishes, insects, plants, reptiles, birds, and mammals are exceptional for their abundance, variety, and detail of preservation. Most remarkable is the story they tell of ancient life in a subtropical landscape. A variety of fossil fishes, insects, plants, reptiles, birds and mammals from ancient Fossil Lake are displayed in the Visitor Center. Experience the geology, wildlife, scenery, and wide open spaces by hiking the interpretive trails, dirt roads or taking the scenic drive. There’s lots of fun stuff for kids. You can make a fossil rubbing, visit a fossil quarry, hike with a ranger, and become a Junior Ranger.

Accessibility: Visitor Center: Handicapped parking spaces for standard-size vehicles; oversize parking spaces accommodate campers, buses, and large RV’s; wheelchair accessible; accessible restrooms; captioned video programs; assistive listening devices; touch fossils; fossil rubbing table. Picnic Area: Parking area suitable for trailers and RV’s; wheelchair accessible boardwalk, vault toilet, and covered picnic table. Interpretive Trails: The surface of park trails is generally compacted soil. Slopes vary from level to 20 percent grade. Be prepared for uneven rough surfaces including rock steps and water bars. Vault toilets at each trailhead are wheelchair accessible. Scenic Drive: 7.5 miles long (3.5 miles paved, 4 miles gravel). The gravel road to the top of Cundick Ridge is narrow and steep. Visitors driving large RVs or pulling trailers are encouraged to turn around at the picnic area. Allow 30 minutes to an hour to complete.

Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail (IA, IL, NE, UT, WY) https://www.nps.gov/mopi/index.htm (801) 741-1012 (Utah) Not available

Explore the Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail across five states to see the route 70,000 Mormons traveled from 1846 to 1869 to escape religious persecution. The Pioneer Company of 1846-1847 established the first route from Nauvoo, Illinois, to Salt Lake City, Utah, covering about 1,300 miles. We recommend contacting the nearest visitors and convention bureau to where you plan to visit for each day you are traveling along the trail or contact the individual sites or parks directly. Some sites may provide accessible trails or pathways for touring an area. National Park Service Auto Tour Route guides provide detailed information to help you plan your visit. The Trip Itineraries page on the website offers state or regional trips - come back to this page often as we amass more trip itineraries for you. Use these resources to plan your visit to the Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail. Go to Places to Go for an interactive map with trail sites and a list of sites by state (https://www.nps.gov/mopi/planyourvisit/index.htm).

Pony Express National Historic Trail (CA, CO, KS, MO, NE, NV, UT, WY) https://www.nps.gov/poex/index.htm (801) 741-1012 (NM; office of National Trails Intermountain Region) https://www.facebook.com/PonyExpressNPS

It is hard to believe that young men once rode horses to carry mail from Missouri to California in the unprecedented time of only 10 days. This relay system along the Pony Express National Historic Trail in eight states was the most direct and practical means of east-west communications before the telegraph. Trip planning along the trail can be challenging given the vast number of land jurisdictions the trail passes through. We recommend contacting the nearest visitors and convention bureau to where you plan to visit for each day you are traveling along the trail or contact the individual sites or parks directly. Our Auto Tour Route guides provide detailed information to help you plan your visit. The Trip Itineraries page offers state or regional trips - come back to this page often as we amass more trip itineraries for you. Use these resources to plan your visit to the Pony Express National Historic Trail; see the following website for more information (https://www.nps.gov/poex/planyourvisit/index.htm).

Yellowstone National Park (ID, MT, WY), Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming https://www.nps.gov/yell/index.htm (307) 344-7381 https://www.facebook.com/YellowstoneNPS

Visit Yellowstone and experience the world’s first national park. Marvel at a volcano’s hidden power rising up in colorful hot springs, mudpots, and geysers. Explore mountains, forests, and lakes to watch wildlife and witness the drama of the natural world unfold. Discover the history that led to the conservation of our national treasures “for the benefit and enjoyment of the people.” Many of the facilities at Yellowstone National Park are more than a century old and built before the adoption of current accessibility standards; accessibility is not always ideal. The National Park Service strives to make the park as universally accessible as possible. Extra obstacles will be encountered because of the remote, wilderness nature of this special place. Facilities described as accessible do not necessarily comply fully with federal standards and some accessible facilities are not marked with the international symbol. The NPS Yellowstone National Park app includes audio-described sites and alternative text for images, combined with your device’s built-in accessibility features. This app includes up-to-date accessibility information for facilities and some trails in the park. Download it before you arrive.

         

We hope this overview is a great asset for your family and that you make some incredible memories the next time you visit!